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William Maley

Acura News: Acura Turns Its Attention Back To Their Sedans

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Acura's crossover lineup has been a bright spot for the Japanese automaker. For example, the redesigned RDX has been setting monthly sales records for sixth straight months since being launched in June. According to Automotive News, deliveries of the RDX "are outpacing 2017 by 22 percent." A fair number of automakers would take this as a sign to continue building out their crossover lineup. But Acura will instead focus on their car lineup.

"We don't know what's going to happen in the future. What's critical is that we stay disciplined and balanced. [We'll] do our best to hit home runs with our sedans also," said Acura General Manager Jon Ikeda.

Acura wants to emulate the success of the RDX onto their sedans. That means bringing a more aggressive design and adding more performance to their three sedans - the ILX, TLX, and RLX.

But what about the CDX?!

For a time, we have been hearing murmurs about Acura possibly bringing over the CDX from China. The CDX shares the same platform as the Honda HR-V, but features an extroverted design.  But an Acura spokesman tells Automotive News that the RDX "can reach down into that smaller segment with its pricing and sway consumers with its added room."

Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required)


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The RLX need an interior overhaul... material quality and fit is well below the segment average.

The ILX feels too close to Civic. The TLX is average at best. 

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Yawn, so in other worlds, their head in the sand approach will stay as is as they are too afraid to compete.

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8 minutes ago, dfelt said:

Yawn, so in other worlds, their head in the sand approach will stay as is as they are too afraid to compete.

Compete with whom?  Lexus, BMW? They are entry level luxury, and they are probably fine with that position.

In a recent Motor Trend comparison between XT4, QX50 and RDX, RDX won.  So applying what they did in RDX should work for them.

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17 minutes ago, ykX said:

Compete with whom?  Lexus, BMW? They are entry level luxury, and they are probably fine with that position.

In a recent Motor Trend comparison between XT4, QX50 and RDX, RDX won.  So applying what they did in RDX should work for them.

Cadillac seeming lost that comparo because it was noticeably smaller than the RDX.  Either way.. 

The idea that all cars should be killed or forgotten is ridiculous.. and for once I'm siding with the Japanese on this. Ford, more so than GM.. as GM still has cars just cutting out the CT6 , Impala and its sisters, and the Cruze and Volt. Truthfully if they just keep thhe CT6 and Impala I wouldn't have a problem. The Malibu/Regal, along with a Sonic redesign can easily take the sales from the death of the Cruze, LaX, while the Volt's sales can be sopped up by the Bolt.. which I could see getting a boost in range soon. Anyway.. with the STOP of the death of the CT6.. Cadillac would have the same core cars that Acura has.. small medium and large

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10 minutes ago, Cmicasa the Great said:

Cadillac seeming lost that comparo because it was noticeably smaller than the RDX.  Either way.. 

The idea that all cars should be killed or forgotten is ridiculous.. and for once I'm siding with the Japanese on this. Ford, more so than GM.. as GM still has cars just cutting out the CT6 , Impala and its sisters, and the Cruze and Volt. Truthfully if they just keep thhe CT6 and Impala I wouldn't have a problem. The Malibu/Regal, along with a Sonic redesign can easily take the sales from the death of the Cruze, LaX, while the Volt's sales can be sopped up by the Bolt.. which I could see getting a boost in range soon. Anyway.. with the STOP of the death of the CT6.. Cadillac would have the same core cars that Acura has.. small medium and large

Quoted for truth....and for once an economy of words and eloquence of language.  Well spoken.

1 hour ago, Drew Dowdell said:

The RLX need an interior overhaul... material quality and fit is well below the segment average.

The ILX feels too close to Civic. The TLX is average at best. 

The restyle on the TLX should appeal greatly to preschoolers whose vehicular styling experience comes from playing with legos while too tired for bed. Seriously.... someone saw this as a clay mock up and approved it for production?

And for once I will side with Cmicassa and against the Japanese. We loose both the Impala and CT6 and get to keep THIS?

40 minutes ago, ykX said:

Compete with whom?  Lexus, BMW? They are entry level luxury, and they are probably fine with that position.

In a recent Motor Trend comparison between XT4, QX50 and RDX, RDX won.  So applying what they did in RDX should work for them.

Like Lincoln, their SUV's really outshine their sedans IMHO. One of my sisters just bought a new Acura SUV and loves it.  I like the technology and build quality of the TLX....latest front end refresh not so great.

51 minutes ago, dfelt said:

Yawn, so in other worlds, their head in the sand approach will stay as is as they are too afraid to compete.

I think that more than afraid to compete know their market and stick to it, much like Subaru. The Japanese seem much less culturally adept at taking risks....in America...I'd rather be a hammer than a nail...in Japan...the nail that sticks up gets hammered down.

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MDX and RDX will continue to do well here but hard to see them growing volume much in other segments that are probably shrinking in sales but growing in competitors (Genesis, Alfa, Jag etc sedans).  I don't know why they haven't thrown the towel in on the RL/RLX yet.

 

 

 

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1 minute ago, frogger said:

MDX and RDX will continue to do well here but hard to see them growing volume much in other segments that are probably shrinking in sales but growing in competitors (Genesis, Alfa, Jag etc sedans).  I don't know why they haven't thrown the towel in on the RL/RLX yet.

 

I"m sure it is coming. 

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20 minutes ago, frogger said:

MDX and RDX will continue to do well here but hard to see them growing volume much in other segments that are probably shrinking in sales but growing in competitors (Genesis, Alfa, Jag etc sedans).  I don't know why they haven't thrown the towel in on the RL/RLX yet.

 

Its weird right? I have no clue what the sales of these vehicles outside of the U.S. are.. or if they exists since at one time Acura was a U.S/Cana. brand only. Perhaps they see profits based on the fact that most Acuras are revised styling exercises on Honda cars and SUVs with standard AWD. I have only one time, other than the NSX, felt that Acura was special.. and that was the original LEGEND COUPE. That's it. 

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I think the crossovers are NA market only.  Some of the sedans are sold as Hondas in other markets, along w the NSX. 

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23 minutes ago, Robert Hall said:

I think the crossovers are NA market only.  Some of the sedans are sold as Hondas in other markets, along w the NSX. 

Right.. but that makes my point. I find very little about Honda that appeals to me. So paying more for different styling makes no sense. With Chevy vs Buick at least.. I am buying domestic.. I am buying Buick heritage.. which exists.. and was prevalent before the Domestic haters attached the Blue Hair mantra on it as an actual characteristic. , plus I get upgraded interiors, quiet tuning, and more luxo styling. Even in terms of performance.. what does Honda really have in terms of consumer products? The Civic Si and Type R? Buick? Was a creator of the Muscle Car era with the Riviera GS,  Buick GSX, GNX, Grand National, and T-Type. Not to mention the current GS, which is a damn nice performer and even with the engine it has performs as well as many an Audi.  Acura??? I just never saw them as anything other than a Honda. And seriously.. when people say that the Corvette can't command prices above $120K.. I point to the HONDA EMBLEM (Europe/Asia) on the NSX and say WHY?

ms4c6348.jpg?itok=WvakbDlY

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15 minutes ago, Cmicasa the Great said:

Right.. but that makes my point. I find very little about Honda that appeals to me. So paying more for different styling makes no sense. With Chevy vs Buick at least.. I am buying domestic.. I am buying Buick heritage.. which exists.. and was prevalent before the Domestic haters attached the Blue Hair mantra on it as an actual characteristic. , plus I get upgraded interiors, quiet tuning, and more luxo styling. Even in terms of performance.. what does Honda really have in terms of consumer products? The Civic Si and Type R? Buick? Was a creator of the Muscle Car era with the Riviera GS,  Buick GSX, GNX, Grand National, and T-Type. Not to mention the current GS, which is a damn nice performer and even with the engine it has performs as well as many an Audi.  Acura??? I just never saw them as anything other than a Honda. And seriously.. when people say that the Corvette can't command prices above $120K.. I point to the HONDA EMBLEM (Europe/Asia) on the NSX and say WHY?

ms4c6348.jpg?itok=WvakbDlY

Besides being domestic, there is not many Buicks that appeal to me over Acura today to be honest.  Not talking about muscle era.  I doubt current GS is better than TLX with V6 and SH-AWD.  I like Buick Enclave and might take it over the MDX, need to drive it once, and I like the Tour X but it is no performer and probably will be gone next year. 

 

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6 minutes ago, ykX said:

 I like the Tour X but it is no performer and probably will be gone next year. 

 

I assume given their Opel nature, both varieties of the Regal will be gone soon. 

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Buick needs to seriously upgrade the Envision soon.  Acura needs to address their infotainment issues.

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Speaking of Buick, I wonder if they will be a CUV only brand in the US in a couple years (at some point I assume they will end the Opel deal for the Regals). 

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Acura needs to kill off the RLX, that car is hopeless and in a shrinking segment.  Double Whammy.  TLX and ILX need big upgrades, really that RLX interior is about what they should be putting in an ILX.  

2 SUVs is not enough for this brand, they need a 3rd, or they'll just lose customers because you can't just ignore the segment below RDX especially as their sedan sales shrink away.

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Not sure about this one....granted some of the higher end Hondas are better (and cheaper) than the Acura.

 

Not really impressed with the line up at all....

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8 hours ago, Robert Hall said:

I assume given their Opel nature, both varieties of the Regal will be gone soon. 

Not necessarily. The Buick Regal is as much a Malibu as it is an Insignia. Not to mention.. its on a GM platform designed with GM engineering

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4 hours ago, regfootball said:

Acura could get by with one sedan.  Old TL sized.  No one will miss the ILX or RLX.

 

 

Agreed

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15 hours ago, riviera74 said:

Buick needs to seriously upgrade the Envision soon.  Acura needs to address their infotainment issues.

MDX and TLX infotainment s@cks big time.   It seems they improved it a lot in the new RDX but it is still not as good as in Cadillac. 

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19 hours ago, Cmicasa the Great said:

Not necessarily. The Buick Regal is as much a Malibu as it is an Insignia. Not to mention.. its on a GM platform designed with GM engineering

i think there is actually a contract with PSA on how long they supply Regals to the US.  They can always cancel a contract, sure.  It is clear that GM has no interest in marketing or pricing and packaging the Regal to actually succeed.

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    • By William Maley
      The COVID-19 pandemic has basically brought most of the world to halt. Orders to stay at home, businesses either having workers to their work from home or closing down, and unemployment skyrocketing is causing the economy to crater. There are efforts to try and jump-start the economy such as $1,200 stimulus checks. But an executive at Ford wants to see a return of a "cash for clunkers" like program.
      “We think some level of stimulus somewhere on the other side of this would help not only the auto industry and our dealers, which are a huge part of our overall economy, but will help the customers as well,” said Mark LaNeve, Ford’s vice president of U.S. marketing, sales and service to Bloomberg.
      “Cash for clunkers was very effective at that time. It would be nice to think we could have something equally as effective for 2020 when we get out of this because it was a great program.”
      According to LaNeve, internal discussions are taking place at Ford about doing a similar program and there are plans to bring the Government in to these talks.
      When asked by Automotive News about this, Ford spokeswoman Rachel McCleery said, "The auto industry is America’s economic engine.We are encouraging Congress to look at a variety of ways to drive job creation, increase demand, support customers and provide long-term stability for the entire auto ecosystem."
      A brief refresher on the Cash for Clunkers program. In 2009, the U.S. Government introduced a billion initiative called the Car Allowance Rebate System, which gave a voucher worth between $2,900 and $4,500 to anyone replacing a vehicle newer than 1984. Their old vehicle would be taken away and disposed of. The program was nicknamed Cash for Clunkers.
      On the surface, the program was a success. Within first month, all of the funds were exhausted. This prompted the U.S. congress infuse an addition two billion into the program, which would be all gone within 17 days. But begin to look deeper and the results are mixed. In 2012, a study published in the Quarterly Journal of Economics described the program as being a bit of a wash,
      "...the effect of the program on auto purchases is almost completely reversed by as early as March 2010 — only seven months after the program ended.”
      Other studies have come to the same conclusion.
      There's also the question of how many perfectly good used cars were taken off the road due to the program.
      Source: Bloomberg via Automotive News (Subscription Required), The Drive, The Truth About Cars
    • By William Maley
      The coronavirus has caused a number of auto shows to either be pushed back (New York) or cancelled (Geneva). Add another show to the list as the Detroit Free Press is reporting tonight at the Detroit Auto Show has been cancelled.
      In a memo that was sent to sponsors today, organizers of the show said that the TCF Center (formally known as Cobo Hall) has been designated as field hospital by Federal Emergency Management Administration [FEMA] for the next six months.
      "The health and welfare of the citizens of Detroit and Michigan is paramount. TCF Center is the ideal location for this important function at this critical and unprecedented time,” NAIAS executive director Rod Albert wrote in the memo obtained by the Free Press.
      The news was confirmed by ABC affiliate WXYZ after speaking with the chair of the 2020 show, Doug North.
      "The North American International Auto Show is officially canceled. TCF is working with FEMA to use the center to deal with the COVID-19 outbreak," said North.
      Ford and General Motors also confirmed the cancellation to The Detroit News.
      Michigan is becoming one of the hardest hit states with COVID-19. State officials announced today that there are 4,650 confirmed cases and 111 deaths linked to COVID-19. Wayne County, where the show takes place has the highest numbers of the state - 2,316 confirmed cases and 46 deaths.
      This was going to be a big year for the Detroit Auto Show with the move to the summer. Plans included rides and drives; an off-road course, and demonstration of autonomous vehicles.
      Source: Detroit Free Press, The Detroit News, WXYZ

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