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William Maley

Tesla Cuts Model 3 Price Again

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4 minutes ago, Drew Dowdell said:

They'll do it by raising the price of petroleum vehicles towards parity. They've already started. 

I didnt even think about that angle. 

Thanks for the insight. 

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On 2/13/2019 at 6:10 AM, ocnblu said:

Anyway I'm not easily distracted by Mike & Ike (the candy) or the soda fountain.  I pay at the pump and I'm on my way down the road, with no special planning on my part if I am away from home.  I can stop and spend five minutes on any street corner in America and replenish my Jeepiat.  Not a care in the world.

And that is going to be the case for EVs soon too... except the fill up schedule is different.  PA is installing EV chargers at the state parks (the tab is being paid for by VW), so you can go hiking or whatever while your car nurses on the EV grid.  Here in Pittsburgh, even if one doesn't have a charger at home, there are charging stations all over including in parking garages downtown.    I have a friend with a Volt out in Columbus OH who lives in an apartment and doesn't have charging there, but he has charging available at work.  So he charges while he's at work and rarely ever uses gasoline in in Volt.  He only ever fills up with gas every 3 months.  He could probably get by with a Bolt, but he got the Volt for cheap. 

EV charging is just a changing of mindset.... I know that will be difficult for certain people. 

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21 minutes ago, Drew Dowdell said:

I know that will be difficult for certain people.

Not difficult.  I.JUST.DON'T.CARE.

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1 minute ago, balthazar said:

How can you tell??

Prices are going up by crazy numbers all around for gasoline cars, but the price of electric or electrified cars is staying fairly flat.

Base price for a Blazer is $30k for FWD. Only way to get AWD is move to the V6 model and get dinged for $35k... for a vehicle that has no more room than the previous generation Equinox... and remarkably similar engine choices.

Compact sedans getting canceled in favor of crossovers that go for $6k to $10k more on the same platform.  Transposing a Sonic into a Trax doesn't cost GM $6,000, but that is how much more it will cost you and very soon you won't have a choice if you're buying new. Fiesta / Ecosport. Dart / Cherokee.  Same formula. 

The price of the Suburban has gone up $1k a year over the last 10 years. 

V6 engines will soon be extinct in mid-size cars moving to cheaper 4-cylinder turbos. The manufacturers took that savings and still raised prices on the Turbo cars. 

Mercedes will sell you a base model stripped out 4-cylinder hatchback for just $33k. 

The Honda Insight is $2k cheaper than the Civic Si. 

The Lease only Honda Clarity is $199 a month $1700 down. A base Accord is $249 a month $2100 down.

Lincoln offers the MKZ as a Turbo-4 or Hybrid-4 either way, same price.

Toyota offers the Avalon or Avalon Hybrid with just a $1k price spread.

 

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It's like artificial intelligence. Dumb now, smart later.

Never bet against it though.

And our old ways will be left to turn to dust, and then become extinct.

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6 minutes ago, Suaviloquent said:

It's like artificial intelligence. Dumb now, smart later.

Never bet against it though.

And our old ways will be left to turn to dust, and then become extinct.

A.I. is the hot new Job market, gotta start out empty and learn. :P 

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Nobody buys electrified Hondas.  So... giving them away is a necessity, and even then it has not worked.

Edited by ocnblu

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      Source: Bloomberg
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