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William Maley

Chicago 2019: 2020 Subaru Legacy: Comments

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3 minutes ago, ccap41 said:

Nothing is a full size car to you. Your opinion on size of vehicles means absolutely nothing after how you speak about fitting and not fitting in vehicles that, conveniently, aren't Cadillac branded. 

LOL, I know full size cars, grew up with my parents having Delta 98's. That is a full size car, same with your 70's Lincolns and Cadillac's. Those were full size cars. Today's full size cars are the 70's and 80's mid size lets be honest here, for young pups like you, they are full size.

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31 minutes ago, dfelt said:

LOL, I know full size cars, grew up with my parents having Delta 98's. That is a full size car, same with your 70's Lincolns and Cadillac's. Those were full size cars. Today's full size cars are the 70's and 80's mid size lets be honest here, for young pups like you, they are full size.

The late 70s downsizing wave and the mid 80s downsizing wave reset the parameters for what a 'full size' car is.   My parents had full size Mercurys and Lincolns when I was growing up, and remember the downsizing from the 79 Continental to the 80s Town Car.       The dimensions of what is a full size car today is smaller than it was 40 years ago. 

Edited by Robert Hall
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28 minutes ago, dfelt said:

LOL, I know full size cars, grew up with my parents having Delta 98's. That is a full size car, same with your 70's Lincolns and Cadillac's. Those were full size cars. Today's full size cars are the 70's and 80's mid size lets be honest here, for young pups like you, they are full size.

I miss the old 70's full size cars. My Grandfather always drove Olds 98's...now that was a car!

14 minutes ago, Robert Hall said:

The late 70s downsizing wave and the mid 80s downsizing wave reset the parameters for what a 'full size' car is.   My parents had full size Mercurys and Lincolns when I was growing up, and remember the downsizing from the 79 Continental to the 80s Town Car.       The dimensions of a what a full size car today is smaller than it was 40 years ago. 

Downsizing was the beginning of the end of the American auto industry as I knew it as a kid.

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I remember there were a lot of reality paradoxes at the time of the downsizing...like the carryover '77 midsize GM A-bodies were actually slightly longer than some of the downsized for '77 B-bodies.  Or the downsized '78 A-bodies were the about the size of the compact X-bodies.   Or the downsized '85-86 GM full sizers that were barely larger than the downsize A-body midsizers.     Or with Chrysler, their full size mid 80s M-body was really a compact mid 70s F-body underneath. 

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"Full-size" is merely a label; what constitutes such today still isn't. At some point what still is called 'full-size' now will be gone, and cars like an accord will be branded 'full-size'. Self-delude at your own risk.

I weigh vehicle physical size much higher than interior cubic volume- which I've never had the occasion to use in it's entirety.

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I respect Subaru's for what they are; that being reliable, capable and so on.

They just aren't my 'cup of tea'. 

The styling of this new Legacy solidifies that opinion.

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30 minutes ago, lengnert said:

I respect Subaru's for what they are; that being reliable, capable and so on.

They just aren't my 'cup of tea'. 

The styling of this new Legacy solidifies that opinion.

The CVT would do it for me.

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On ‎2‎/‎15‎/‎2019 at 7:04 PM, Drew Dowdell said:

Subarus are a "safe" choice for people who don't care about cars. They're a Japanese Volvo. 

I have to say, though, that I am really digging the Volvo designs of the last 10 years or so!

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On 2/15/2019 at 7:04 PM, Drew Dowdell said:

Subarus are a "safe" choice for people who don't care about cars. They're a Japanese Volvo. 

Those would be fighting words for a bunch of SCCA guys as well as my daughter who love the BRZ and WRX/STI.

22 minutes ago, lengnert said:

I have to say, though, that I am really digging the Volvo designs of the last 10 years or so!

I am also.

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2 minutes ago, A Horse With No Name said:

Those would be fighting words for a bunch of SCCA guys as well as my daughter who love the BRZ and WRX/STI.

Yet @Drew Dowdell is spot on here, Subaru is the Japanese safe Volvo equal.

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1 minute ago, dfelt said:

Yet @Drew Dowdell is spot on here, Subaru is the Japanese safe Volvo equal.

Without the expensive Euro car repairs.

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1 hour ago, lengnert said:

I have to say, though, that I am really digging the Volvo designs of the last 10 years or so!

I am too.  Especially their interiors. 

1 hour ago, A Horse With No Name said:

Those would be fighting words for a bunch of SCCA guys as well as my daughter who love the BRZ and WRX/STI..

SCCA cars can be safe too. 

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