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Drew Dowdell

How often do you change your oil?

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42 minutes ago, ccap41 said:

Remember when you said all of your experiences have been positive and then you tell us they put the wrong oil in and your vehicle sounded like crap after they put the wrong oil in it so then you had to go back and have them change it again..? 

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49 minutes ago, ccap41 said:

Remember when you said all of your experiences have been positive and then you tell us they put the wrong oil in and your vehicle sounded like crap after they put the wrong oil in it so then you had to go back and have them change it again..? 

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Yup, the temp service guy put my auto down for a regular oil change not looking at my history that Randy always makes sure I get my Mobile 1. Even then they changed it out and all was good. So Human error on the Temp person, not the regular service.

Human error / mistakes does happen. I still say this was a good experience as the dealership took care of me.

Some could dwell on the dealer making a mistake, but if they did not take care of you, then that is an even bigger evil. My dealership took care of me as it was their mistake. All is good. :) 

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2 minutes ago, dfelt said:

Yup, the temp service guy put my auto down for a regular oil change not looking at my history that Randy always makes sure I get my Mobile 1. Even then they changed it out and all was good. So Human error on the Temp person, not the regular service.

Human error / mistakes does happen. I still say this was a good experience as the dealership took care of me.

Some could dwell on the dealer making a mistake, but if they did not take care of you, then that is an even bigger evil. My dealership took care of me as it was their mistake. All is good. :) 

Jeez, Mr. ExcuseMcGee. Human error is 100% of the reason people have bad experiences at dealerships. Nobody gets angry at the part itself that fails but they get angry when the service is crap, work was done poorly, and they're charged out the @ss because they went to the dealership. 

Your BAD EXPERIENCE is exactly the reason people don't like going to dealerships, or any repair shops. 

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Just now, ccap41 said:

Jeez, Mr. ExcuseMcGee. Human error is 100% of the reason people have bad experiences at dealerships. Nobody gets angry at the part itself that fails but they get angry when the service is crap, work was done poorly, and they're charged out the @ss because they went to the dealership. 

Your BAD EXPERIENCE is exactly the reason people don't like going to dealerships, or any repair shops. 

I just look for the positive side of life all the time, no need to waste emotion and energy on human error that can be easily corrected.

Now if the repair was say a brake job and the whole assembly came off causing big damage to my auto, then hell ya I would be pissed and probably explode if they did not fix it.

GM has always been good about taking care of the part failures and making it right to me.

Just how I look at life, my Wine Glass is always half full with Chocolates on the side! :P 

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In @dfelt's defense, my own dealership experience has been over good as well when they do need to do repairs.  The problem for me has been with them finding something wrong to begin with. I took it down for a burning smell and they sent it back saying nothing was wrong. A month later, I'm back down there, still with a burning smell, and they find a coolant leak. The repair was fast (thermostat housing replaced) and price was fair once they found the problem. 

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9 minutes ago, Drew Dowdell said:

In @dfelt's defense, my own dealership experience has been over good as well when they do need to do repairs.  The problem for me has been with them finding something wrong to begin with. I took it down for a burning smell and they sent it back saying nothing was wrong. A month later, I'm back down there, still with a burning smell, and they find a coolant leak. The repair was fast (thermostat housing replaced) and price was fair once they found the problem. 

This brings up one of my biggest concerns I have noticed in the overall auto industry on the ASE certification. That is how does one troubleshoot a problem versus just being a certified parts replacement person.

Growing up with a father that had an Auto repair business, my dad pounded into me that you need to always think about what caused the issue and if it is a sign of something bigger going on. Just do not take the easy way out to replace a part and the customer is back a month later or 6 months. 

As such, I tend to troubleshoot my auto issues first and investigate it before I take it to the dealership to do the grunt work of repairing it. That in and of itself could also be a reason I have not really ever had a problem with the dealership. I tend to spend some time on what I believe the problem is and still ask them to do a complete check to try and insure I have not missed anything.

Specialty tools being what they are, it has become more and more that it is not worth my time to do the repairs compared to a competent dealership / repair shop.

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Posted (edited)

Not only dealers often do sloppy job ( I had few occasions) but also they significantly overcharge on everything.  When my wife's car was under warranty and I took it to a service they said that it needs new rear brake pads.  The quote to replace JUST  rear pads was $300.  I bought higher quality pads than OEM for $40 and it took me 40 minutes for the whole job.  Now please, tell me again why I should go to a dealer.

Edited by ykX
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51 minutes ago, ykX said:

Not only dealers often do sloppy job ( I had few occasions) but also they significantly overcharge on everything.  When my wife's car was under warranty and I took it to a service they said that it needs new rear brake pads.  The quote to replace JUST  rear pads was $300.  I bought higher quality pads than OEM for $40 and it took me 40 minutes for the whole job.  Now please, tell me again why I should go to a dealer.

You are the exception as are most of us on this forum. I would not trust most people to have the tools let alone the knowledge of how to change the brake pads. Yet with that, do you have the tools to check and make sure the rotors or drums are not warped? If so can you then have them turned to be true again? Plus are you properly disposing of the toxic waste or just dumping it in the trash. 

All this comes into play and for the most part, you should, but I understand not always be able to trust the dealership to put it to OEM spec and have it covered by them if they mess up easier than a small 3rd party mechanic.

Not always will the dealership be right for everyone and there is plenty I do myself over a dealer, but for bigger jobs, a dealer over a 3rd party mechanic is how I will choose.

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Brake pads don't take any special tools. I've done my own as well. I guess I should say I've done my parents' vehicles with my dad as I've never owned a vehicle long enough to have to change the brakes, lol.

Pretty much nothing can be turned now. Rotors have become cheap enough and thin enough because of weight that you just replace them. 

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15 minutes ago, ccap41 said:

Brake pads don't take any special tools. I've done my own as well. I guess I should say I've done my parents' vehicles with my dad as I've never owned a vehicle long enough to have to change the brakes, lol.

Pretty much nothing can be turned now. Rotors have become cheap enough and thin enough because of weight that you just replace them. 

Maybe on low end auto's but on all of mine, I get 1 turn out of the rotors.

Not everyone has a big enough caliper to clamp down and compress the brakes to then release the pads out of the front rotors. Rear drums you can use a standard screwdriver to release the tension on the drum if a lip has built up. If you have to rebuild them, then using a drill with a proper stone attachment to smooth out the inner cylinder before rebuilding it and adjusting it to spec can require having the tool to release the loaded springs. For most people having these tools is not common as to why you have various options of where to have it done. 

Like I said we forum members are a rare group of do it yourselfers.

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Posted (edited)

My wife and I do not drive that much. My restaurant is close to my home and my wife is a housewife. She works hard enough keeping me in line, feeding me and cleaning me. Then after all that, she takes care of our 2 kids and keeps her house in order...yes, I said HER house. A man's house is his castle. But in reality, it and everything in it belongs to his wife. Whether he wants to admit to that or  not. 

Anyway. 

We change the oils of both cars 2 times a year. Once just before winter hits and once in the early spring. Way before the oil needs to be changed. Why?

Like I said, we both do not drive a lot, but by law, in Quebec, winter tires need to be installed, so when we install the winter tires in December, we change the oil at the same time. When we go back to all seasons in the early spring, we change the oils. Because Im not gonna make another pit stop to the garage just to change the oils when need be.  Might as well just change the oil then. Therefore, both cars JUST visit the garage 2 times a year. Both cars are reliable that unexpected garage visits were not made just yet. 

Ive had countless of recalls on the Ford Fusion, and some of those recalls were done at the same time when changing the tires and oils. A couple of times, the recalls were made outside those times. A loaner was given so no phoques were given on my part for that...

Coincidentally,  the wife's Fusion has an appointment tomorrow for her tires to be changed, oil will be changed, AND a recall will be fixed...

My appointment for the tires is next Tuesday. Oils and brakes need to be checked and possibly pads to be replaced. If the pads are good, but not great, and I cant go until next December, Ill change the pads next week so I dont make another garage visit in the summer just for brake pads, so ill change them a tad pre-maturely as well....and so forth and so forth.

We go to the car's respective dealerships.  I get my work done at the Acura dealership where I bought my car, and the Fusion gets its shyte done at the Ford dealership where we bought the car.

Oils...whatever Acura and Ford recommend for the cars respectively, and for our cold Canadian winters.  And quite honestly, I do NOT know what that is.  I think both the Acura TL SH-AWD and the 1.6 liter Ecoboosted Fusion take 5W20. 

Since we dont drive often, and we change  oils twice a year on low mileage, I dont check the oil levels or how dirty it may be. 

Yes, I trust the dealership. I have never ever had a bad experience at ANY dealership garage that I have bought my cars at. In fact, they even give me loaners when I dont ask for them and dont even need them. I tell them I dont need a loaner because I have a second car at my disposal, but most of the time they give me a loaner anyway.  Granted, sometimes I dont get my cars the day of my rendez-vous because they might overbook, but they know I dont make an issue and to compensate they give me a loaner.  

Tomorrow, the recall is a biggie, something about the shifter cable degrading over time prompting the shifter to be difficult to move or not at all... and I think its a  8-10  hour job over the course of 2 days,  plus everything else the Fusion needs...therefore, the dealership will give me a loaner.  Because recall.  I think the Fusion will be in the shop 3 days minimum. 

I guess they could charge me for an oil change that they did not make, I guess that would be 50 or 60 bucks or whatever it is,  and I wouldnt know because I dont check to see if they actually changed my oils, but hey...if something happened to the engine, it would be on them since I do ALL my oil changes at THEIR dealership....so there is that...but both motors on both cars purr and run smooooth like the day they rolled of the showroom floor.... 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by oldshurst442
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11 hours ago, oldshurst442 said:

by law, in Quebec, winter tires need to be installed

HAHA, here in PA, the law states... simply remove summer air and replace with winter air.  No need to switch the en tire

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1 hour ago, ocnblu said:

HAHA, here in PA, the law states... simply remove summer air and replace with winter air.  No need to switch the en tire

Quebec is a nanny state...it sucks!

Now...I do see a major difference with winter tires versus all seasons in winter driving. Therefore I dont mind this particular law because it actually makes sense.  But...morons now, drive a tad faster then before thinking they got better grip and you know what?  Accidents STILL happen!  

Humans will ALWAYS try to circumvent the very law that is in place to protect them just to get hurt themselves rendering the law useless...

 

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16 hours ago, dfelt said:

You are the exception as are most of us on this forum. I would not trust most people to have the tools let alone the knowledge of how to change the brake pads. Yet with that, do you have the tools to check and make sure the rotors or drums are not warped? If so can you then have them turned to be true again? Plus are you properly disposing of the toxic waste or just dumping it in the trash.

We were not talking about general public, so don't change the subject.  A lot of guys at my work are more than capable of doing such work, but I work with engineers and technicians.  There is nothing complicated about changing brake pads.  Rotors, I have read conflicting reports, it seems cutting rotors doesn't really help with warping and residue, and from my experience cutting rotors extend their life only for a short period of time and it seems to me just a waste of time and money.  I use high quality rotors, but I just replace them, when they go bad.  

And what toxic waste you are talking about?  Pads as far as I know are not toxic and don't require any special disposal, rotors are just steel, and oil is accepted for free for recycling in Walmart or different auto shops.

1 hour ago, oldshurst442 said:

Quebec is a nanny state...it sucks!

Now...I do see a major difference with winter tires versus all seasons in winter driving. Therefore I dont mind this particular law because it actually makes sense.  But...morons now, drive a tad faster then before thinking they got better grip and you know what?  Accidents STILL happen!  

Humans will ALWAYS try to circumvent the very law that is in place to protect them just to get hurt themselves rendering the law useless...

 

Actually I think winter tires are great and much better than all-seasons.  I think all northern states should require from people to have winter tires.  Many people want AWD vehicles without realizing that proper winter tires will be much more beneficial for winter driving.

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16 hours ago, dfelt said:

Maybe on low end auto's but on all of mine, I get 1 turn out of the rotors.

Yours are also pretty old at this point. They've changed a lot since 2006.

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When I had my '06 C350 I asked about having the rotors turned and O'reillys said most modern rotors are made thin enough that there's no point in having them turned for $20 when new rotors are only $40 or so. 

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1 minute ago, ccap41 said:

When I had my '06 C350 I asked about having the rotors turned and O'reillys said most modern rotors are made thin enough that there's no point in having them turned for $20 when new rotors are only $40 or so. 

That's probably the case for my Encore. I had to buy new.  Now, the good thing is they lasted me about 80,000 miles in the first place, so I couldn't really be mad about it. 

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I figure if I get 4 years out of brakes these days (rotors+pads) based on current traffic and mileage I'm content.  It took a few years to settle on a shop I trust in this neighbourhood for maintenance, worth it since I can just walk there or home when dropping the car off.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I vary on oil changes. Sometimes I do it myself, sometimes I take it to a shop.  It usually just depends on the weather and on how busy I am.  If I use the dealership, sometimes I just drive it down myself and work from there because even though I have pickup and dropoff, getting that setup can sometimes be a scheduling issue.  When it works though, it works nice. 

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8 hours ago, ykX said:

We were not talking about general public, so don't change the subject.  A lot of guys at my work are more than capable of doing such work, but I work with engineers and technicians.  There is nothing complicated about changing brake pads.  Rotors, I have read conflicting reports, it seems cutting rotors doesn't really help with warping and residue, and from my experience cutting rotors extend their life only for a short period of time and it seems to me just a waste of time and money.  I use high quality rotors, but I just replace them, when they go bad.  

And what toxic waste you are talking about?  Pads as far as I know are not toxic and don't require any special disposal, rotors are just steel, and oil is accepted for free for recycling in Walmart or different auto shops.

Actually I think winter tires are great and much better than all-seasons.  I think all northern states should require from people to have winter tires.  Many people want AWD vehicles without realizing that proper winter tires will be much more beneficial for winter driving.

Yes. Winter tires are better than all seasons. I agree.  But in slippery conditions...nothing saves you. Slowing down does though...

All I need is FWD and Im good. Now that Im used to winter tires,  I DO prefer winters over all seasons, but a good all season tire that is NEW with FWD and I could manage all right.  Like I said...slowing down is key to not losing control of your car.

When the conditions are such that 50km/h (30mph) and your car gets squiggly with all seasons on, a winter tired FWD car could maybe  go  35mph, to get to that squiggly state, but...when its time to stop, NOW!...welll...you aint stopping NOW whether you got winters or all seasons...and sure your stopping distances maybe a tad shorter with winters on...the thing is you need to stop NOW! But you aint gonnna stop...

Slowing down is the key...regardless what kind of tire you got on.

AWD/4 wheel drive just helps with not getting stuck in snow if there was a huge snowfall and you are parked.  Or you wanna go through huge snowbanks because the snow plow did not plow yet.  Again, you got a car that has a high enough ground clearance, and the road does not have ice underneath, not a low sports car, but a NORMAL car, RWD or FWD car , preferably a FWD car,  one could go through uncleared roads easily enough and there is no need for AWD...  

I find that traction control, when it does not have a snow feature, hinders forward movement in snow, because sometimes, the driving wheels NEED to spin on snow and ice to move. OK...this is where AWD DOES come in handy. But its handy, not necessary...

I got an AWD TL.   Its great in the winter especially with winter tires on.  But my wifes FWD Fusion  with winters on does a great job too. The only thing I do not like about the Fusion for winter is that the Fusion seems to have a lower ground clearance than I used to for a family sedan and for winter driving in Montreal. 

 

Just to say, that they gave my wife a Ford Edge with a 3.5 under the hood. AWD.  

The Fusion needs rotors.  Funny that the conversation is about rotors, but yeah, the Fusion needs rotors at 35 000 miles. I find that strange...

 

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2 hours ago, Drew Dowdell said:

I did just fine in a RWD CTS with winter tires on. 

Winter tires are a game changer. 

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I change my oil every 2,500 miles.  (I know the rule of thumb for conventional oil is every 3,000 miles.)

I do it every 2,500 miles for the math.  That is, I end up on even 10,000s.  So, every 5,000, I put in a bottle of fuel injector (and system) cleaner.  And, every 10,000, I change the air filter.

That means I change the oil 1 time more per year than if I did it every 3,000 miles.  At $ 35 extra per year, I don't view that as a big deal and it really helps me stick to my maintenance schedule.

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53 minutes ago, trinacriabob said:

I change my oil every 2,500 miles.  (I know the rule of thumb for conventional oil is every 3,000 miles.)

I do it every 2,500 miles for the math.  That is, I end up on even 10,000s.  So, every 5,000, I put in a bottle of fuel injector (and system) cleaner.  And, every 10,000, I change the air filter.

That means I change the oil 1 time more per year than if I did it every 3,000 miles.  At $ 35 extra per year, I don't view that as a big deal and it really helps me stick to my maintenance schedule.

 

Every 2,500 is a bit excessive. Just running Synthetic and doubling your change schedule would save you time and money and you still would be changing your oil too early. 7,500 is the norm these days. 

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      Many of us are excited with the big drop in oil prices and finally gas prices retreating to below $2 a gallon in many places around the US. Some here on Cheers and Gears even feel that alternative energy auto's are a waste of time or should not even be bothered with.
       
      So it was with interest when I saw this story on Bloombergs web site.
       
      Another Oil Crash Is Coming, and There May Be No RecoveryThe focus on this is that with Tesla in 2017 and Chevy later this year, 2016 beginning to sell 200 Mile, $30,000 auto's, other Auto OEMs spending Billions to also field electric auto's with long battery pack range that the days of Dino powered auto's are limited.
       
      Bloomberg clearly states that OPEC and even ExxonMobil have reported that they only see EV auto's making up 1% at most by 2040 on the planet.
       
      What no one saw was the Huge growth in US oil fields in 2014 and a global glut of 2 million barrels of oil a day sitting on the market.
       
      Bloomberg reviewed world wide data to see that EV Auto's grew by 60% in 2015, show no signs of slowing down among governments push to reduce smog in cities around the world. Based on buying trends and who fast things can change, Bloomberg is predicting that by 2023 we will see another 2 million barrels of Oil being unused on the market leading to this prediction of another crash and the power of the Oil Companies being reduced.
       
      The video they have on their story is also very interesting to watch and listen too.
       
      Review the original story, watch the video and sound off on what you think of the OIL Industry and where we are headed with auto's!
       
      Bloomberg Oil Crash Story
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