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Drew Dowdell

Quick Drive: 2020 Kia Telluride SX AWD

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I’ve seen a couple on the road by me, they look presentable. But the standard driver safety features would make it a hard ‘no’ for me.

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6 hours ago, daves87rs said:

Yep, and my favorite part being cheaper as well! I think they could throw on some light rebates and really move these well!

They're priced low enough, no rebates neeeded. These are examples GM should study of price it right from the start...

And have dealers end up with 2 left, and lists of people waiting for the right combo to come in.

1 hour ago, balthazar said:

I’ve seen a couple on the road by me, they look presentable. But the standard driver safety features would make it a hard ‘no’ for me.

Oh, the tragedies of Lane Keep helper...blind spot...or auto stopping😂

No worries. GM still barely offers any of these "standard on a Corolla" features even on a Cadillac, so one brand group is still safe for you.

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I’m too ‘established in my experience’ to have the brakes & steering wheel fighting me for control. Toyota can go F itself; keep them optional/ defeatable or disabable.

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46 minutes ago, balthazar said:

I’m too ‘established in my experience’ to have the brakes & steering wheel fighting me for control. Toyota can go F itself; keep them optional/ defeatable or disabable.

They always are...it's buttons, in most vehicles. But interesting opinion. Just turn things off👍

Or drive a GM. They give you so little, except for possibly a hidden cash back perk, features are the least of the worry...

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Not all features are disable-able. My first course of investigation would be; can you pull fuse(s) to turn off permanently.

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7 minutes ago, balthazar said:

Not all features are disable-able. My first course of investigation would be; can you pull fuse(s) to turn off permanently.

I think fuses would work on just about any model.... 🙂 

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If they're an option (such as on the GM trucks), I'm sure it's on a separate circuit. 
But for those vehicles where it's mandatory, they may be too integrated- who knows.
I just have zero interest in my steering wheel, pedals and seat vibrating, buzzing, tweeting, back pressuring constantly. It's like being poked with a sharp stick.

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I can't imagine things like lane-keep assist and active braking aren't just settings you can turn off. 

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If you think about it as a stop along the road to full AD, which for some unknown reason OEMs believe everyone wants, I can easily see it as 'we know what you want better than you do' and more & more of these features will be hard-wired/ un-defeatable.

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Is there any vehicle that can't turn off lane keep assist or auto braking? 

@Drew Dowdell @William Maley You two could probably answer that with some real-world experience and the most hands-on experience with modern vehicles.. any insight? 

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We got two Palisades in today.  SE models, one FWD the other AWD.  They're OK I guess.  I like the butch look of the Telluride better.

My Jeep has a very effective safety feature/driver aid that I cannot turn off.  It's called lack of horses.

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, ocnblu said:

We got two Palisades in today.  SE models, one FWD the other AWD.  They're OK I guess.  I like the butch look of the Telluride better.

My Jeep has a very effective safety feature/driver aid that I cannot turn off.  It's called lack of horses.

Haha. Sometimes steering feel and blind spot that beeps...are all you need. Works for me.

As I drive a "self driving...mostly" 2019 Subaru Forester daily. Though I do love when it stops itself...forwards or backwards;)

Edited by caddycruiser

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On 7/5/2019 at 11:23 AM, ccap41 said:

Is there any vehicle that can't turn off lane keep assist or auto braking? 

@Drew Dowdell @William Maley You two could probably answer that with some real-world experience and the most hands-on experience with modern vehicles.. any insight? 

Not with any vehicle I have recently driven.

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On 7/4/2019 at 8:01 PM, balthazar said:

I just have zero interest in my steering wheel, pedals and seat vibrating, buzzing, tweeting, back pressuring constantly.

if that's a constant occurrence, maybe you need the driving aids

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It’s likely that those who have the ‘nanny suite’ will increasingly need them; they certainly aren’t there to improve one’s skills.

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Never had a vehicle w/ the lane keep or blind spot warning, but I can see how it would be useful in traffic.   I did have a Tahoe rental with lane keep and it was neat how the seat vibrated.    I'm sure I'll have something sooner or later with these features.   One feature the higher trims of Jeep have that mine doesn't that I do wish I had were the power folding mirrors...not a safety feature per se, but it would have prevented smashing my mirror backing out of my narrow-ass garage...

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Don’t have much of that on my Nox thank goodness... Though I love the back up camera right now.....

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18 hours ago, William Maley said:

Not with any vehicle I have recently driven.

That's what I would have expected. I couldn't imagine anybody has all of that equipment un-defeatable. 

I don't have anything that is active like lane keep assist or active braking to avoid an accident but I do have whatever cross traffic warning when backing up and it is surprisingly really nice. Just yesterday I was backing out into an ally-like road(not technically an ally but small and narrow) and I was parked next to a shed and could only creep out to even see if anybody was coming and my car let me know there was an F150 barreling down the road before I had any idea there would be anything coming. This and parking lots where there is another large vehicle parked next to you makes this feature surprisingly really nice. 

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A neighbor down the street from me just traded their previous gen GLS for a Snow White Pearl new Telluride SX.  It has a lot more presence than the GLS. 

On 7/5/2019 at 11:23 AM, ccap41 said:

Is there any vehicle that can't turn off lane keep assist or auto braking? 

@Drew Dowdell @William Maley You two could probably answer that with some real-world experience and the most hands-on experience with modern vehicles.. any insight? 

Every vehicle that I've driven that has such features has a menu option somewhere to turn them off.  And they stay off.

The limited features I have in my Encore, Lane keep alert, collision alert, and park assist are all able to be disabled at the touch of a button and they stay off unless I put them back on again.  

The only one I can't fully disable is rainsense in that it's always on if the wipers are set to intermittent. But I can turn the wipers off or constant naturally. I like rainsense though, so I usually leave it on. 

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13 hours ago, Drew Dowdell said:

A neighbor down the street from me just traded their previous gen GLS for a Snow White Pearl new Telluride SX.  It has a lot more presence than the GLS.

🤨 🤔 😆

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Seems the lane keep works pretty well on this model

 

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On 7/8/2019 at 10:43 PM, balthazar said:

🤨 🤔 😆

Common lately...

As are the XC90, Q7, etc. trades...on Ascents, Tellurides, and...

It's simple. Great ute, loaded features, known quality rep, and "oooh, I like it". After a couple years of "holy...this Benz...this Audi...this...were expensive and those $300 oil changes..." smart ones look elsewhere.

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7 hours ago, riviera74 said:

I just read this on the Hyundai Palisade, which is KIA's more upscale twin.

http://www.thedetroitbureau.com/2019/07/first-drive-2020-hyundai-palisade-2/

I have one question: What is GM's answer to the challenge posed by these vehicles?

It sure cannot be the Cadillac XT5/6. Nice CUVs, but Hyundai is killin them.

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    • By William Maley
      I’ll admit that I have an unabashed love for the Mazda MX-5 Miata. This plucky roadster proves you don’t need gobs of power to provide a big grin when driving. A combination of well-sorted chassis, steering, and slick gearbox does the trick. But Mazda has decided to add a bit more power for the 2019 model, along with including a more powerful four-cylinder and a hardtop option. I’m curious to see if these changes can make the Miata better or worse.
      The model seen here is the RF - short for retractable fastback. Press the switch and the roof panels begin an origami folding exercise into the trunk. The result is a targa that provides the open-air feeling, minus a large amount of wind noise. It doesn’t hurt that roof pillars are styled in such a way that gives off a rakish look, no matter whether the top is up or down. Under the hood lies a revised 2.0L Skyactiv four-cylinder with 181 horsepower and 151 pound-feet of torque - up 26 and 3 respectively. A six-speed manual is standard, while an automatic is optional. The small bump makes for a huge improvement in overall acceleration. Just leaving a stop, I was surprised how much pull the engine had as it got to 45 about a half-second quicker than the last Miata.   A key change is Mazda bumping the redline to 7,500 rpm, which allows the engine to fully flex its muscle. This became apparent when I needed to pass a vehicle and found that I didn’t need to drop down a gear to get the power needed.  The six-speed manual is still a joy to work with short and precise throws and a direct feeling clutch pedal. Even when stuck in traffic, doing the motions didn’t feel like a hassle. Average fuel economy for the week landed around 32 mpg, even though I was winding the engine out and playing through the gears just because it is so much fun. My tester was the Club model that adds a sport-tuned suspension with Bilstein shock absorbers, and a front shock tower brace. This firms up the suspension and provides improve handling on the limit. But out on the backroads, I couldn’t tell there was any real difference in handling between this and the 2016 MX-5 Grand Touring I drove a few years back. Maybe there was slightly less body roll in the RF, but both vehicles had similar characteristics when going into a turn. If I drove both of them on a track, then I think the differences would become more apparent. There is a downside to the Club’s suspension, a very harsh ride. Just making a quick trip to the store was a bit much as the suspension would transmit every little bump and imperfection to the backside of those sitting inside. Another item fitted to my tester was a set of Recaro bucket seats. They come as part of an option package that also adds Brembo Brakes and some cool-looking BBS wheels finished in black. The seats have increased bolstering to hold you in during an enthusiastic drive. But the lack of padding makes them uncomfortable for longer trips. On paper, the RF is an expensive proposition when put against the soft-top: $32,345 vs. $25,730. That massive difference is due to Mazda not offering the base Sport model on the RF. But put the soft-top Club against the RF and the difference shrinks to just over $2,000. Be forewarned that the RF can get expensive. That package I mentioned earlier with the Recaro seats? That will set you back $4,670, bringing the as-tested price to just over $38,000. Mazda’s improvements for the 2019 MX-5 Miata for the most part help, allowing it to become more fun to drive and somewhat easier to live with. That said, the additional cost of the hardtop will depend on whether or not you think it is worth the benefits of possibly being an all-seasons car. Disclaimer: Mazda Provided the MX-5 Miata RF, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2019
      Make: Mazda
      Model: MX-5 Miata RF
      Trim: Club
      Engine: 2.0L SkyActiv-G DOHC 16-Valve with VVT Four-Cylinder
      Driveline: Six-Speed Manual, Rear-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 181 @ 7,000
      Torque @ RPM: 151 @ 4,000
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 26/34/29
      Curb Weight: 2,453 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Hiroshima, Japan
      Base Price: $32,345
      As Tested Price: $38,335 (Includes $895.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      Brembo with Black Roof - $4,670.00
      Interior Package for M/T - $425.00

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