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William Maley

Review: 2019 Buick Regal GS

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Expectation can be a very dangerous thing. You come into something thinking it will blow your mind and more often than not, it comes up short. That’s how I felt during the first few days into a loan of a 2019 Buick Regal GS. What was being presented didn’t match up with my experience. But over the week I had the vehicle, it began to grow on. That isn’t to say some issues need to be addressed.

At first glance, you might think Buick decided to stick with a sedan shape. But the sloping rear hatch gives away its true identity as a Sportback. This helps give the impression that the Regal is sporty, helped further by short overhangs. By adding small touches such as large front air intakes, GS-specific 19-inch wheels. Brembo front brake calipers finished in Red, and a small lip spoiler, the GS transforms the Regal into looking like a red-blooded sports sedan. 

The interior sadly doesn’t match up with what is being presented on the outside. While there was some effort to make the GS stand out with faux carbon-fiber trim, special sport seats, and GS badging, it doesn’t quite match with what is being presented outside. Not helping are some cheap plastics littered throughout the Regal GS’ interior. If this was a standard Regal, I may have given it a slight pass. But considering this GS carries a price of almost $43k, it becomes a big issue. The interior does redeem it somewhat with a logical and simple layout. No one had any complaints about whether the controls were confusing or hard to reach.

Let’s talk about the front seats, The Regal GS comes fitted with racing-style front seat with aggressive side bolstering and faux holes towards the top where the belts for a harness would go into. This design seems more at home in a hardcore Corvette than a Buick. Before you start thinking that the seat design only allows a small group of people to fit, Buick has fitted adjustable bolstering to allow a wide set of body types to sit comfortably. With this and other power adjustments, I was able to find a position that suited me. Over a long drive, the seats were able to provide the right amount of support and comfort.

The back seats don’t get the same “race car” treatment as the front, but they do offer ample head and legroom for most passengers. Cargo space is quite impressive with 31.5 cubic feet with the seats up and 60.7 when folded. The Kia Stinger I drove back in January pales in comparison with 23.3 and 40.9 cubic feet.

The Regal GS features an eight-inch touchscreen with the new Buick Infotainment 3 system. As I mentioned in my Silverado/Sierra 1500 review, the new system is worlds better than Intellilink. The interface has been cleaned up with simpler graphics and fonts that are much easier to read. Also seeing noticeable improvements is the overall performance. The system is much faster when bringing up different functions or crunching a route on the optional navigation system. Apple CarPlay, Android Auto, and OnStar 4G LTE round off the system. 

With the effort Buick has put in, you might have the feeling that the Regal GS has something special under the hood. That isn’t the case. Under the hood of the GS is GM’s venerable 3.6L V6 with 310 horsepower and 282 pound-feet. While the V6 packs 40 more horsepower than the 2.0L turbo-four from the last-generation model, it is also down 13 pound-feet. This absence becomes apparent when you decide to sprint away from a stoplight or exiting a corner as you need to work the engine to get that rush of power. A numb throttle response doesn’t help. If you resist from attack mode, the V6 reveals a quiet and refined nature. But again, you will need to work the engine when merging or making a pass.

Before someone shouts “put a turbo on it”, Buick cannot do that as there isn’t enough space in the engine bay due to the design of the platform. We’ve known about this issue since 2016 when Holden was gearing up to launch the Commodore - its version of the OpelVauxhall Insignia.

Quote

“According to media reports, Holden pushed for the V6 and all-wheel drive combination for their requirements. There were rumors of the Commodore getting a twin-turbo V6 - possibly the twin-turbo 3.0L or 3.6L from Cadillac. But that isn't going to happen for a simple reason - it can't fit in the Insignia/Commodore's platform (E2XX).”  

The nine-speed automatic transmission goes about its business with unobtrusive shifts when going about your daily errands, but offers up snappy shifts when you decide to get aggressive. A glaring omission on this sports sedan is the lack of paddle shifters. 

Fuel economy for the 2019 Regal GS is 19 City/27 Highway/22 Combined. I saw an average of 20 during the week. This can likely to be attributed to the test vehicle having under 1,000 miles on the odometer. 

On paper, the Regal GS’ handling credentials seem top-notch with Continuous Damping Control (CDC) system and a GKN all-wheel drive system featuring a twin-clutch torque-vectoring rear differential. The latter allows a varying amount of power sent to each rear wheel to improve cornering. In the real world, the GS is more Grand Tourer than Gran Sport. While the sedan shows little body roll, its reflexes are slightly muted due to a nearly 3,800 pound curb weight. The steering provides a decent amount of weight when turning, but don’t expect a lot of road feel. What about that AWD system? For the most part, you really won’t notice working unless you decide to push the limits or practice your winter driving skills in a snowy and empty parking lot. 

Thanks to the CDC system, the Regal GS’ ride is surprisingly smooth. With the vehicle in Tour, the suspension glides over bumps and imperfections. The ride begins to get choppy if you One area that I’m glad Buick is still focusing on is noise isolation. Road and wind noise is almost non-existent. 

The 2019 Buick Regal GS is a case of expectations being put too high. Despite what the exterior and sports seats of the interior may hint at, this isn’t a sports sedan like a Kia Stinger GT or something from a German luxury brand. But my feelings began to change when I thought of the GS as being more of a grand tourer. It has the ingredients such as a refined powertrain, a suspension that can be altered to provide either a comfortable or sporty ride; and minimizing the amount of outside noise.

There lies the overall problem with Regal GS as Buick doesn’t quite know what it wants to be. Does it want to be a sport sedan or a luxury sedan with grand tourer tendencies? This confusion will likely cause many people to look at something else which is a big shame.

How I Would Configure a 2019 Buick Regal GS.

My particular configuration would be similar to the vehicle tested here with the Driver Confidence Package #2, Sights and Sounds, and Appearance packages. The only change would be adding the White Frost Tricoat color, which adds an additional $1,095 to the price. All together, it comes out to $44,210.

Alternatives to the 2019 Buick Regal GS:

  • Kia Stinger: The big elephant in the room when talking about the Regal GS. For a similar amount of cash, you can step into the base GT model with its 365 horsepower twin-turbo V6 and rear-wheel drive setup (AWD adds $2,200). I came away very impressed with the styling, performance on tap from the V6, and handling prowess. Downsides include the interior design being a bit too minimalist and the ride being a bit rough.
  • Volkswagen Arteon: The other dark horse to the Regal GS. There is no doubt that the Arteon is quite handsome with flowing lines and sleek fastback shape. Having sat in one at the Detroit Auto Show earlier this year, I found it to be very roomy and upscale in terms of the interior materials. I hope to get some time behind the wheel in the near future to see how it measures up in handling.

Disclaimer: Buick Provided the Regal GS, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas

Year: 2019
Make: Buick
Model: Regal
Trim: GS
Engine: 3.6L V6
Driveline: Nine-Speed Automatic, All-Wheel Drive
Horsepower @ RPM: 310 @ 6,800 
Torque @ RPM: 282 @ 5,200
Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 19/27/22
Curb Weight: 3,796 lbs
Location of Manufacture: Rüsselsheim Germany
Base Price: $39,070
As Tested Price: $43,115 (Includes $925.00 Destination Charge)

Options:
Driver Confidence Package #2: $1,690.00
Sights and Sounds Package: $945.00
Appearance Package: $485.00


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I would think a turbo 4 banger tweaked to maximum performance in balance with long life would be a better solution for a GS over a buttery smooth V6.

I expect this auto to be gone by 2021.

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After never having seen a new GS ever on road...far upstate NY the last week, I counted 3 of them.

Nondescript, and not as interesting as the previous one in some details, but bigger and smoother. Good look on road, and total sleeper. Nothing looks different, at all. Add in white, gray, and silver as the 3 I saw...and nope.

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Faster and smoother engine than an Arteon, not as nice of an interior.
Slower than a Stinger GT, about equal on the interior.

Still, a decent handler, but a total sleeper. 

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Identity Crisis in Car Form...”

i would say that tagline is quite apropos. 

Now that the 2.7t is out, that might not be a bad mill to try to stuff in this thing. 

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1 hour ago, Larry C. Brown said:

Is any Buick being manufactured in America anymore?

Enclave

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12 hours ago, Larry C. Brown said:

Is any Buick being manufactured in America anymore?

As you correctly point out, most Buicks are built overseas.

Encore - S. Korea
Envision - China
Enclave - US
Regal - Germany
 

When they were still around:
Lacrosse - US
Cascada - Poland

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11 hours ago, Drew Dowdell said:

As you correctly point out, most Buicks are built overseas.

Encore - S. Korea
Envision - China
Enclave - US
Regal - Germany
 

When they were still around:
Lacrosse - US
Cascada - Poland

and none of these carry the Buick nameplate anymore; just the tricolor logo.

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2 hours ago, Larry C. Brown said:

and none of these carry the Buick nameplate anymore; just the tricolor logo.

I don't have as much an issue with that.  Benz and Audi don't put their name on the car, just the logo. 

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I saw a new Regal at the grocery this morning...was about 75 feet away, w/ the lights on.  At first I thought it was a BMW 3/4 hatchback from that distance in the early morning gloom...gray, with a round badge and those taillights..

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On 8/6/2019 at 12:54 PM, dfelt said:

I would think a turbo 4 banger tweaked to maximum performance in balance with long life would be a better solution for a GS over a buttery smooth V6.

I expect this auto to be gone by 2021.

I saw one today.  A black sportback.  I realized I was looking at "a German Buick."  The sportback has some clean lines, so it's okay.  Even though it's a passenger car and a high line GM, it's really not for me.

I'm agreeing with your second sentence.  I don't think it will stick around.  The only thing that makes it practicable for Buick and GM is that it is not assembled here.  Having it built in Germany is like a tentacle of their operations that they can prune.  Germany is not GM country.

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On 9/29/2019 at 10:50 AM, Drew Dowdell said:

I don't have as much an issue with that.  Benz and Audi don't put their name on the car, just the logo. 

Every car you mentioned is manufactured in Europe (including the Regal). They do things differently than vehicles built in the US.

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12 hours ago, Larry C. Brown said:

Every car you mentioned is manufactured in Europe (including the Regal). They do things differently than vehicles built in the US.

Chevy and Cadillac don't put their names on their cars either, just the badge.   

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7 minutes ago, Robert Hall said:

Chevy and Cadillac don't put their names on their cars either, just the badge.   

You are correct. It only started in 2013. The change was intended to give a cleaner, less congested branding appearance and was communicated through a GM Marketing Administrative message. I haven't been on GM lot in a while.

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      Disclaimer: Mitsubishi Provided the Outlander PHEV, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2020
      Make: Mitsubishi
      Model: Outlander PHEV
      Trim: GT
      Engine: 60kW Electric Motors (Front and Rear Axles), 2.0L MIVEC DOHC 16-Valve Four-Cylinder
      Driveline: Single Speed Reduction Gearbox (Front & Rear), All-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 80 @ 0 (Electric), 117 @ 4,500 (Gas),  190 (Total)
      Torque @ RPM: 101 @ 0 (Front Electric Motor), 144 @ 0 (Rear Electric Motor), 137 @ 4,500 (Gas)
      Fuel Economy: MPGe/Gasoline Combined - 74/25
      Curb Weight: 4,222 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Okazaki, Japan
      Base Price: $41,495
      As Tested Price: $43,600 (Includes $1,095.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      GT Premium Interior Package - $400.00
      Pearl White Paint - $395.00
      Carpeted Floor Mats and Portfolio - $145.00
      Charging Cable Storage Bag - $70.00

      View full article
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