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Here the growth area is chain convenience stores wanting to put in gas pumps, also. We have Wawa thru a number of east coast states, and they closed/tore down a store because the township wouldn't allow them to put in pumps, then built new stores (with pumps) in adjacent townships to the north & south of the old site. QuickChek is another chain- just built 2 new stores within the last 12-24 months in my immediate area, both with pumps but none with chargers.

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Haha, while ignoring the elephant in the room... CALIFORNIA... the biggest whiny brat in the union.

So, you're not wrong, but just wanted to zoom in a bit for more detail.... Storms do happen, no grid is ever 100%.  I lose power shockingly often for being only ~10 miles from a downtown metro ar

Hard Pass on "shared mobility".  If I want shared mobility, I will get a bus pass or take a train.

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Chain convenience stores around here seem to be co-sited with name brand gas stations around here...Shell, BP, Sunoco w/ branded convenience stores seem to be common.    Looks like I only bought gas for my Jeep 3 times in 2020.  Was a strange year.

 

Edited by Robert Hall
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Some good reading as it rights many wrongs on the attack by the ICE side on EVs.

Study Against EVs Backed By Legacy Automakers Is Debunked In Epic Way (insideevs.com)

Electric Cars Need Way Less Raw Materials Than ICE Vehicles (insideevs.com)

After reading both stories and then following the links to see what all is in the reports used for these stories, EV is the right way to go for Humanity.

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Seems huge obstacles in obtaining raw materials are hampering all projections of achieving 100% BE vehicles by 2035. A harsh dose of reality, perhaps.

https://finance.yahoo.com/news/electric-america-needs-more-mines-174844266.html

It is obviously pertinent to include the carbon footprint of building/operating new mines and all that involves, in the so-called 'carbon footprint' of BE's (not to mention the carbon footprint of manufacturing & installing a few hundred thousand public charging stations). The raw materials and fueling infrastructure of IC has long been established.

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8 hours ago, balthazar said:

Seems huge obstacles in obtaining raw materials are hampering all projections of achieving 100% BE vehicles by 2035. A harsh dose of reality, perhaps.

https://finance.yahoo.com/news/electric-america-needs-more-mines-174844266.html

It is obviously pertinent to include the carbon footprint of building/operating new mines and all that involves, in the so-called 'carbon footprint' of BE's (not to mention the carbon footprint of manufacturing & installing a few hundred thousand public charging stations). The raw materials and fueling infrastructure of IC has long been established.

I do wonder how much of the existing use of various metals can be replaced by using lite weight high strength plastics / carbon fiber. That would be interesting to know the impact of those materials versus the pit mines. I know BMW has one of the worlds largest Carbon Fiber manufacturing plants in Moses Lake Washington as they off set their use in the i series auto's by selling spools of the fiber to Boeing for the Dream liner planes. Supposedly that is one of their greenest plants for BMW.

BMW Group and SGL Group to triple production capacities at Moses Lake carbon fiber plant From 2014. 

BMW plans big expansion of Moses Lake carbon-fiber plant | The Spokesman-Review From 2014 local paper.

Plant has been constantly growing as they now also sell the spools of Carbon Fiber to other auto companies.

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In 2017, we first heard of a change with GMC moving to Carbon Fiber beds that would outperform the Ford Aluminum bed or the high strength steel that RAM and gm has been using. 

GM to use carbon fiber in redesigned pickup beds (autonews.com)

In 2019 We were introduced to CarbonPro beds and the news media seemed to be very excited.

GM Could Expand Carbon Fiber Use Beyond Trucks | GM Authority

GM increases use of carbon fiber for durability (autonews.com)

GMC has this official site on their web site.

Sierra CarbonPro Bed: Innovation & Durability | GMC Life

Been searching to see if this will be used in the Hummer, but not found anything yet. Makes sense to use it to reduce weight.

@balthazar I hate to make assumptions, but was wondering did you upgrade to this bed or is your new truck going to have the standard high strength steel bed?

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Fisker abandons solid-state EV batteries

Fisker abandons solid-state EV batteries | Autoblog

"I think personally, they’re at least seven years out, if not more, in terms of any sort of high-volume format," he said. "... once you have a breakthrough in that technology, you need probably three years to set up high-volume manufacturing, and then you need another three years to do durability testing. So even if somebody invented it today, it would be at least probably six years out."

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26 minutes ago, David said:

I hate to make assumptions, but was wondering did you upgrade to this bed or is your new truck going to have the standard high strength steel bed?

It's only available on the Denali & AT4, and it's part of a package that costs $11-12K. So no.

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20 minutes ago, ykX said:

Fisker abandons solid-state EV batteries

Fisker abandons solid-state EV batteries | Autoblog

"I think personally, they’re at least seven years out, if not more, in terms of any sort of high-volume format," he said. "... once you have a breakthrough in that technology, you need probably three years to set up high-volume manufacturing, and then you need another three years to do durability testing. So even if somebody invented it today, it would be at least probably six years out."

I think Fisker is hurting for money as to why they abandon their Solid State battery. Without deep pockets, you cannot deliver and we already are aware that both Toyota and gm are planning to show off their solid state batteries this year in concept auto's.

Toyota ready to unveil solid-state battery EV in 2021 | Autoblog

Plenty of write up on the benefits and I still think we will see at the high end Solid state batteries by the later half of 2020's Solid State going into production in luxury EVs.

Solid-state batteries to change the game for electric vehicles - TechHQ

The future of electric vehicles is powered by solid-state batteries (techwireasia.com)

The Eternal Promise of Solid-State Batteries (autoweek.com)

Big difference in size of a traditional Li-Ion battery and Solid state of the same power.

image.png

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CNBC is reporting an interview with Volvo CTO who has stated, NO FUTURE LONG-TERM for ICE auto's. As such, they have stated the following:

  • Online Only sales model working with Volvo pickup locations.
    • People can still go to a Volvo location to test drive and buy if they do not want to order online from volvocars.com
    • Location sales associates will help you place an order online.
    • Orders placed will then be delivered to the pickup locations from a regional holding area. 
    • Demonstrator auto's will be at the global Volvo locations.
    •  
  • Hybrids are a bridging technology and will only be around till 2030
  • 2030 moving forward will be pure EV only for global product line
  • Due to competition, online ordering will lower costs, better transparency, stronger customer loyalty, faster purchase response for the auto you want.

Volvo says it will be 'fully electric' by 2030 and move car sales online (msn.com)

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1 hour ago, David said:

I do wonder how much of the existing use of various metals can be replaced by using lite weight high strength plastics / carbon fiber.

No; it's powertrain-related metals, copper, lithium, etc etc, not steels or aluminum.

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50 minutes ago, David said:

I think Fisker is hurting for money as to why they abandon their Solid State battery. Without deep pockets, you cannot deliver and we already are aware that both Toyota and gm are planning to show off their solid state batteries this year in concept auto's.

It might be true but I believe it when I see it.  It has been a lot of talk about solid state batteries but so far nothing realistic.

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Seems Magna will bring a 25th manufacturing facility to Michigan as they just broke ground on a plant that will supply battery enclosures for Hummer EV. This plant will add 300 jobs to the local economy.

345,000 sq-ft facility is their new Magna Electric Vehicle Structures building and a $70 million dollar investment over the next few years. The plant is expected to go live in production in 2022 at the same time that the gm/LG battery plant goes live with production.

Magna says they will supply battery enclosures for a growing list of auto companies in Steel, Aluminum, carbon and Multi-material configurations, customized to meet the needs of each customer at this plant.

Magna is currently hiring for a variety of jobs, including managers, engineers, operators and more.

Charged EVs | Magna’s new Michigan plant to supply battery pack parts for Hummer EV - Charged EVs

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Business Insider is reporting that Tesla is bleeding market share almost 100% to Ford as people dump their Tesla and buy a Mach-E.

This report comes from Morgan Stanley, This same time a year ago Tesla had 81% market share in the USA for EV sales. Year later Tesla is only 69% EV market share. Sales are up 40% for BEV sales.

Morgan Stanley is projecting Tesla to drop below 60% EV market share this year 2021 and to drop below 50% in 2022 as more and more EV auto choices come out from the various OEMs.

Tesla Is Bleeding Battery EV Market Share To Ford's Mustang Mach-E: Morgan Stanley | Markets Insider (businessinsider.com)

Ford Mach-E had 3,739 units sold in February 2021 compared to just 238 units sold in January 2021 and a symbolic 3 in December 2020. Currently the Mach-E accounts for 2.4% of Fords auto sales in the U.S.

Ford Mustang Mach-E U.S. Sales Exceed 3,700 In February (insideevs.com)

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Actually up 34% vs. a year ago (total industry was down 6%). Which was still off the peak set in 2018.

Report says Mustang Mach-E was responsible for almost 100% of Tesla's market share PERCENTAGE loss, but Ford only built 6700 units in 2020.

Lo-ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooong way to go

Edited by balthazar
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Percentages have their place, but they throw the casual reader off with ease. 

You read 'sales are up 50%!' and that's factually correct when you go from (4) to (6).

Far more impactful if you go from 400,000 to 600,000.

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Here's a short historical overview, that I think parallels can be drawn to the battery electric vehicle arena.
- - - - - 
The UPC / bar code device took a long time to get to the point it is today.
1949 Conceived and patented (as a 'bull's-eye' design).
• 1952 : patent granted.
• 1960 : Laser light demonstrated.
• 1966 : Kroger supermarket chain produced booklet that in part mentioned a 'future where an optical scanner could read product prices'.
• 1972 : Real-world (successful) test at a Kroger's of an automated check stand (of the bull's-eye design).
• call to standardize the system / fielding manufacturer & marketer commentary.
• 7 (all U.S.) companies put in submissions. Criteria was; it had to be a max of 1.5" square, readable at any speed & direction (the initial concern that resulted in the bull's eye design), and have less than 1 error in 20,000 scans.
• 1974 : first bar code design public scan.
• Not an immediate success. K-Mart led a huge push, and it 'took off' in grocery & business industries in the 1980s.
2004 : Fortune magazine estimated that the bar code was used by 80-90% of the Top 500 U.S. companies.
- - - - -

TONS of parallels going on. Allowing a long interval of time to optimize the technology [scanners / batteries], 'universalizing' the bar code / charging plugs, and the normal 'evolution' of getting every corporate entity & manufacturer online. 

Note that from the retailer's point of view, this was openly requested/desired, and the consumer only saw faster check-out/stocking of goods- both positives. There was no change in the shopper's practice, and no massive price spiking to implement the system. It was seamless, unobtrusive, intangible.

Still took roughly 50 years to become widespread.

This is the natural course of commerce & manufacturing in the world. Change happens, but change takes time. A LOT of time. This example is a perfect reflection of why I continue to repeat that internal combustion bans in 14 years aren't going to stand. 

Edited by balthazar
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48 minutes ago, balthazar said:

Here's a short historical overview, that I think parallels can be drawn to the battery electric vehicle arena.
- - - - - 
The UPC / bar code device took a long time to get to the point it is today.
1949 Conceived and patented (as a 'bull's-eye' design).
• 1952 : patent granted.
• 1960 : Laser light demonstrated.
• 1966 : Kroger supermarket chain produced booklet that in part mentioned a 'future where an optical scanner could read product prices'.
• 1972 : Real-world (successful) test at a Kroger's of an automated check stand (of the bull's-eye design).
• call to standardize the system / fielding manufacturer & marketer commentary.
• 7 (all U.S.) companies put in submissions. Criteria was; it had to be a max of 1.5" square, readable at any speed & direction (the initial concern that resulted in the bull's eye design), and have less than 1 error in 20,000 scans.
• 1974 : first bar code design public scan.
• Not an immediate success. K-Mart led a huge push, and it 'took off' in grocery & business industries in the 1980s.
2004 : Fortune magazine estimated that the bar code was used by 80-90% of the Top 500 U.S. companies.
- - - - -

TONS of parallels going on. Allowing a long interval of time to optimize the technology [scanners / batteries], 'universalizing' the bar code / charging plugs, and the normal 'evolution' of getting every corporate entity & manufacturer online. 

Note that from the retailer's point of view, this was openly requested/desired, and the consumer only saw faster check-out/stocking of goods- both positives. There was no change in the shopper's practice, and no massive price spiking to implement the system. It was seamless, unobtrusive, intangible.

Still took roughly 50 years to become widespread.

This is the natural course of commerce & manufacturing in the world. Change happens, but change takes time. A LOT of time. This example is a perfect reflection of why I continue to repeat that internal combustion bans in 14 years aren't going to stand. 

THANK YOU, Yes this is a excellent example and plenty of parallels can be taken from this.

The one thing to point out is that technology from 49 to the 1980's was so minuscule compared to where technology is at today. I do not see a 30 year slow tech change that happened for the lowly bar code. We already have much superior electric motors and battery tech that is changing much faster. I believe just like the computer industry that started slow in the 90's with consumer models and then exploded in the last 15 years will be a much more modern way that BEVs will happen IMHO.

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You must've missed the part where laser / optical scanning became possible during the timeline. That was monstrous.

BEVs are still not using standardized plugs or charge rates, just like in the dawn of electrification of US consumer goods, which had a multitude of different plug designs & voltages. It's a very outdated approach that seems to be ignoring past successful models. 
 

Screen Shot 2021-03-05 at 2.24.19 PM.png

Screen Shot 2021-03-05 at 2.24.22 PM.png

Screen Shot 2021-03-05 at 2.24.43 PM.png

Edited by balthazar
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2 hours ago, balthazar said:

You must've missed the part where laser / optical scanning became possible during the timeline. That was monstrous.

BEVs are still not using standardized plugs or charge rates, just like in the dawn of electrification of US consumer goods, which had a multitude of different plug designs & voltages. It's a very outdated approach that seems to be ignoring past successful models. 
 

Tesla chooses to go with a proprietary standard and yet has already converted to the SAE J1772 for Europe and China.

Nissan still pushing their dying, almost dead CHAdeMO standard, but has stated they will also go with the SAE connection for their first mainstream BEV under Infiniti label.

Other than Tesla, everyone else is supporting the SAE standard. Who is not, as I have not seen anyone else announce a different connector for Level 1, 2 and 3 chargers.

I have seen you can get a converter on Amazon for allowing your Tesla to connect to the SAE chargers.

SAE J1772 - Wikipedia

Search for 'J1772' - SAE International

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Very exciting review on the VW ID.4 with both positives and negatives that I agree with and that the reviewer was a 6'6" tall long leg guy who actually tested being comfy in the front seat and then getting out and testing the back seat.

Cool Read. Hopefully VW will take his input to heart as they get ready to start production here.

2021 VW ID.4: 5 hits and misses, up close with the electric car for the masses (greencarreports.com)

 

With the New 2022 Bolt released, 2021 Bolts have gotten crazy cheap especially for Costco members. Get $3,000 up front cash to use as a down payment and $107 a month lease rate with 12,000 miles a year for 36 months.

Cheapest new-car lease is all-electric: Chevy Bolt EV lease deals as low as $107 per month (greencarreports.com)

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Breaking News

Montgomery County, Maryland which operates 200 schools and a fleet of over 1,400 diesel buses has signed a contract with Highland Electric Transportation for phase 1 of a massive bus fleet transformation.

Over the next four years, Highland Electric Transportation will deliver 326 electric school buses and electrify all five of the MCPS's bus depots including a V2G or vehicle-to-grid component.

The buses will have a 226 kWh capacity power train from Proterra with a 135 mile range.

image.png

Charged EVs | Proterra to deliver over 320 V2G-equipped school buses to Montgomery County, Maryland - Charged EVs

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