Jump to content

Alternative Fuels & Propulsion RANDOM


Recommended Posts

First review of the all new XC40 Recharge, have to say it is looking good.

Preview drive: 2021 Volvo XC40 Recharge electric SUV doesn’t complicate the future (greencarreports.com)

Frunks are the new standard for EVs now. Very cool, I can only imagine on a Suburban how big the Frunk would be.

image.png

Crazy to watch, an auto dash cam caught the roof coming off a Tesla Model S in China. Tesla blames the 3rd party company that is authorized for replacement glass roofs. I say just cheap quality work.

image.png

Tesla Model S roof seen flying off in dashcam video, Tesla blames third-party shop - Electrek

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 2.6k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Haha, while ignoring the elephant in the room... CALIFORNIA... the biggest whiny brat in the union.

It's been a while since I've been around.  I was browsing through some active threads when I came across this one.  After yesterday's announcement by California's idio, er I mean governor, it's more p

The hilariously inept Newsom has provided plenty of material with this one.  The meme-makers are really making hay!    Chevy's new California-Compliant transportation alternative!

Posted Images

For those that want a truly beefy off road SUV, but green, then the Ineos Grenadier 4x4 is for you and yes it only comes with black steel rims and is powered by Hydrogen. This comes due to a tie up between Hyundai Nexo technology and Ineos who is building this 4x4 for the UK and European market. The producer of Hydrogen is the Ineos Chemical Company that produces 300,000 tons of Hydrogen per year as a byproduct of chemical manufacturing operations and has a large amount of experience in storing and transporting Hydrogen. They have recently started a new division tasked with building out a Hydrogen station business across the UK and Europe.

Hyundai, Ineos join forces to produce hydrogen | Autoblog

image.png

 

  • Thanks 1
  • Confused 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Just think, use of Solar, Wind, Geothermal, tidal and hydro to replace all coal and EVs to replace all oil needs, we can then pretty much just support the US needs just fine with oil for other plastics and stuff as has been pointed out by @balthazar and have cleaner air and beaches.

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, David said:

Just think, use of Solar, Wind, Geothermal, tidal and hydro to replace all coal and EVs to replace all oil needs, we can then pretty much just support the US needs just fine with oil for other plastics and stuff as has been pointed out by @balthazar and have cleaner air and beaches.

This would be my firm hope. 

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Coal is only 23% of electrical energy sources.  Renewable is about 17%.  If renewables completely replace coal (which will take years if not decades) it is still will be only 40%.  The rest is natural gas and nuclear.

@David do you have any estimate of the electric energy capacity required to replace all cars with EVs?

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
  • Upvote 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Gov't will not allow only domestic power-equipment companies to supply the U.S. It was so disappointing that the wind turbine market (parts/tech) was quickly swallowed nearly whole by China; it was a clean break that could've 'created jobs' and disallowed 'foreign controls over our power'. Opportunity squandered. Same will happen upon any vast increases in the 'renewables' segments. It's like Gov't's foot hurts, so it chainsaws one hand off so the foot 'feels better'.

Bill Nye is yet another who fails to see the big picture.

  • Thanks 1
  • Upvote 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, A Horse With No Name said:

If the star wars storm troopers were ever going to have an official truck this would be the best option for them.

Guarantee you they would miss ICE just like they miss everything else.

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, ocnblu said:

China:  they're not bad folks, FOLKS!/sarcasm for those disinclined to catch a drift

Like everyone, no one is bad, just the power hungry idiots that have no brains and destroy working with others all in the focus of personal power, control and stupidity. Chinese are just as nice of people as Korean, Japanese, French, German, Russian, US, etc.

  • Confused 1
  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Amazing how little progress has been made since then.  It's still same-old, same-old with EV. 

It's like Clint Eastwood said, a man's got to know his limitations.  :smilewide:

  • Sad 1
  • Downvote 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Since @David didn't answer my question about electric consumption demand as we switch EVs here is a good estimate:

How Much Electricity Will It Take to Power Electric Cars of the Future? (inverse.com)

Since Texas and California consume more electricity than any other states, they provide a good snapshot of what a future filled with electric vehicles might look like. In both cases, an increase in EVs would drive consumption higher, with the potential to strain local infrastructure.

If virtually all passenger cars in Texas were electrified today, the state would need approximately 110 more terawatt-hours of electricity per year — the average annual electricity consumption of 11 million homes. The added electricity demand would result in a 30 percent increase over current consumption in Texas.

By comparison, because of a more temperate climate, California might require nearly 50 percent more electricity than it currently consumes if passenger vehicles in the state were fully electrified. That means California would need to generate an additional 120 terawatt-hours of electricity per year.

In 2018, the Electric Reliability Council of Texas, the organization that manages most of Texas’s electric grid, hit a new peak demand of roughly 73 gigawatts on July 19. Looking at the off-peak hours for July 19, 2018, we found the ERCOT grid had spare capacity to provide more than 350 gigawatt-hours of additional electricity if idled power plants continued to operate throughout the day, not just during peak demand.

Based on our estimates, the charging requirements for a fully electrified fleet of personal cars in Texas would be about 290 gigawatt-hours per day, less than the available surplus of generation capacity. In other words, the Texas grid could theoretically charge a fully electrified vehicle fleet today if vehicles were charged during off-peak hours.

When we did the same analysis for California, however, we found that if EVs become the norm, it could push the total demand for electricity beyond the existing capacity of the Golden State’s grid.

To meet that demand, California and Texas would need to build new power plants or buy more electricity from neighboring states than they already do. The states might also need additional transmission and distribution infrastructure to accommodate new automotive charging infrastructure.

  • Thanks 3
  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, balthazar said:

Screen Shot 2020-11-24 at 10.30.19 PM.png

Screen Shot 2020-11-24 at 10.32.45 PM.png

Screen Shot 2020-11-24 at 10.32.56 PM.png

So the jaunkyard pics are Uncar, undone. Nice. 

29 minutes ago, ykX said:

Since @David didn't answer my question about electric consumption demand as we switch EVs here is a good estimate:

How Much Electricity Will It Take to Power Electric Cars of the Future? (inverse.com)

Since Texas and California consume more electricity than any other states, they provide a good snapshot of what a future filled with electric vehicles might look like. In both cases, an increase in EVs would drive consumption higher, with the potential to strain local infrastructure.

If virtually all passenger cars in Texas were electrified today, the state would need approximately 110 more terawatt-hours of electricity per year — the average annual electricity consumption of 11 million homes. The added electricity demand would result in a 30 percent increase over current consumption in Texas.

By comparison, because of a more temperate climate, California might require nearly 50 percent more electricity than it currently consumes if passenger vehicles in the state were fully electrified. That means California would need to generate an additional 120 terawatt-hours of electricity per year.

In 2018, the Electric Reliability Council of Texas, the organization that manages most of Texas’s electric grid, hit a new peak demand of roughly 73 gigawatts on July 19. Looking at the off-peak hours for July 19, 2018, we found the ERCOT grid had spare capacity to provide more than 350 gigawatt-hours of additional electricity if idled power plants continued to operate throughout the day, not just during peak demand.

Based on our estimates, the charging requirements for a fully electrified fleet of personal cars in Texas would be about 290 gigawatt-hours per day, less than the available surplus of generation capacity. In other words, the Texas grid could theoretically charge a fully electrified vehicle fleet today if vehicles were charged during off-peak hours.

When we did the same analysis for California, however, we found that if EVs become the norm, it could push the total demand for electricity beyond the existing capacity of the Golden State’s grid.

To meet that demand, California and Texas would need to build new power plants or buy more electricity from neighboring states than they already do. The states might also need additional transmission and distribution infrastructure to accommodate new automotive charging infrastructure.

Changes are coming to the power grid regardless of how we feel about it. Given a Biden presidency, we will see an uptick of immigration, and we will continue to see population rise even without immigration. Technology will continue to move foreard, and people will want more luxuries and more lifestyle accesories. 

All the more reason to develop wind, solar and the like. 

You are also looking at a change over decades. I don't see this being a problem for the grid. 

2 hours ago, ocnblu said:

Amazing how little progress has been made since then.  It's still same-old, same-old with EV. 

It's like Clint Eastwood said, a man's got to know his limitations.  :smilewide:

Wasn't clint eastwood the one who rambled endlessly and mindlessly at a chair in a political speech once? Methinks you might be emulating your hollywood celebrity buddy a little too closely. 

Try this celebrity instead...

1987-1988 Chevrolet Celebrity Eurosport VR: More Euro Than Sport | Autopolis

Or this one, now with more ICE

eBay Find of the Day: 1983 Chevy Celebrity Eurosport Dragster | Autoblog

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

They managed to make the Pacer even uglier. 

Screen Shot 2020-11-24 at 10.32.56 PM.png

12 hours ago, ocnblu said:

China:  they're not bad folks, FOLKS!/sarcasm for those disinclined to catch a drift

I prefer my drift japanese, not Chinese, thank you. 

 

15 hours ago, balthazar said:

Gov't will not allow only domestic power-equipment companies to supply the U.S. It was so disappointing that the wind turbine market (parts/tech) was quickly swallowed nearly whole by China; it was a clean break that could've 'created jobs' and disallowed 'foreign controls over our power'. Opportunity squandered. Same will happen upon any vast increases in the 'renewables' segments. It's like Gov't's foot hurts, so it chainsaws one hand off so the foot 'feels better'.

Bill Nye is yet another who fails to see the big picture.

WE can still transition, and should still transition. 

  • Haha 1
  • Upvote 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, ykX said:

Since @David didn't answer my question about electric consumption demand as we switch EVs here is a good estimate:

How Much Electricity Will It Take to Power Electric Cars of the Future? (inverse.com)

Since Texas and California consume more electricity than any other states, they provide a good snapshot of what a future filled with electric vehicles might look like. In both cases, an increase in EVs would drive consumption higher, with the potential to strain local infrastructure.

If virtually all passenger cars in Texas were electrified today, the state would need approximately 110 more terawatt-hours of electricity per year — the average annual electricity consumption of 11 million homes. The added electricity demand would result in a 30 percent increase over current consumption in Texas.

By comparison, because of a more temperate climate, California might require nearly 50 percent more electricity than it currently consumes if passenger vehicles in the state were fully electrified. That means California would need to generate an additional 120 terawatt-hours of electricity per year.

In 2018, the Electric Reliability Council of Texas, the organization that manages most of Texas’s electric grid, hit a new peak demand of roughly 73 gigawatts on July 19. Looking at the off-peak hours for July 19, 2018, we found the ERCOT grid had spare capacity to provide more than 350 gigawatt-hours of additional electricity if idled power plants continued to operate throughout the day, not just during peak demand.

Based on our estimates, the charging requirements for a fully electrified fleet of personal cars in Texas would be about 290 gigawatt-hours per day, less than the available surplus of generation capacity. In other words, the Texas grid could theoretically charge a fully electrified vehicle fleet today if vehicles were charged during off-peak hours.

When we did the same analysis for California, however, we found that if EVs become the norm, it could push the total demand for electricity beyond the existing capacity of the Golden State’s grid.

To meet that demand, California and Texas would need to build new power plants or buy more electricity from neighboring states than they already do. The states might also need additional transmission and distribution infrastructure to accommodate new automotive charging infrastructure.

Thanks for Posting, have a project deadline, so did not have time to dig into this and will not till after Dec 12th to see how this lines up with Washington and Oregon, course we sell a ton of surplus electricity to California. :P 

Like all things, building and adding capacity will come as the industry moves to EV's and the electricity providers become the new oil barons. 

With the amount of open space not being used, Texas is building solar farms fast and adding capacity at a very large growing rate. They just brought online Upton 2 Solar Farm, a 212 plus MegaWatt production facility and they approved a new 1,310 megawatt facility that just broke ground and will be fully functional starting in 2022 with more solar farms to come. 

California is adding Wind, Solar and Tide power generation, I believe that the states that embrace EV adoption also realize the need to add power and make the grid redundant. Just as they are expanding and building redundancy here in Washington state, I would expect other states to do the same investing in the future, creating jobs, etc.

As Balthazar has stated, change will take time and time is on the side of change as the states adapt and build out.

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

But ya still cannot beat a 10 second Pontiac Powered Pacer! :P 

 

We could also do Gremlin Wheelie Drag Racing.

 

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, David said:

But ya still cannot beat a 10 second Pontiac Powered Pacer! :P 

 

 

I bet a certain 9 second 59 Buick would put this on the trailer and look good doing it.

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, ocnblu said:

Amazing how little progress has been made since then.  It's still same-old, same-old with EV.

C'mon Bill. For the same (equivalent) $90K, one could have this hideous marshmallow or a Model S- they aren't remotely close in any category other than both being electric. Progress within the EV vehicle field is inarguable.

Mainstream acceptance (the lack thereof) is likewise inarguable. The market will continue to set the pace here, not Gov't mandates & bans.

  • Upvote 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, balthazar said:

C'mon Bill. For the same (equivalent) $90K, one could have this hideous marshmallow or a Model S- they aren't remotely close in any category other than both being electric. Progress within the EV vehicle field is inarguable.

Mainstream acceptance (the lack thereof) is likewise inarguable. The market will continue to set the pace here, not Gov't mandates & bans.

China and Europe will see far more electrication  of personal automotive transportation than we will. I think the market will respond to that, and offerings will trickle down into the US market. Nothing wrong with that. I love my gas powered Ford Ranger jsut fine. And I want a gaser Wrangler or Bronco. But eventually I hope to own an EV. Owning it would be cool and different. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, ykX said:

Since @David didn't answer my question about electric consumption demand as we switch EVs here is a good estimate:

How Much Electricity Will It Take to Power Electric Cars of the Future? (inverse.com)

Since Texas and California consume more electricity than any other states, they provide a good snapshot of what a future filled with electric vehicles might look like. In both cases, an increase in EVs would drive consumption higher, with the potential to strain local infrastructure.

If virtually all passenger cars in Texas were electrified today, the state would need approximately 110 more terawatt-hours of electricity per year — the average annual electricity consumption of 11 million homes. The added electricity demand would result in a 30 percent increase over current consumption in Texas.

By comparison, because of a more temperate climate, California might require nearly 50 percent more electricity than it currently consumes if passenger vehicles in the state were fully electrified. That means California would need to generate an additional 120 terawatt-hours of electricity per year.

In 2018, the Electric Reliability Council of Texas, the organization that manages most of Texas’s electric grid, hit a new peak demand of roughly 73 gigawatts on July 19. Looking at the off-peak hours for July 19, 2018, we found the ERCOT grid had spare capacity to provide more than 350 gigawatt-hours of additional electricity if idled power plants continued to operate throughout the day, not just during peak demand.

Based on our estimates, the charging requirements for a fully electrified fleet of personal cars in Texas would be about 290 gigawatt-hours per day, less than the available surplus of generation capacity. In other words, the Texas grid could theoretically charge a fully electrified vehicle fleet today if vehicles were charged during off-peak hours.

When we did the same analysis for California, however, we found that if EVs become the norm, it could push the total demand for electricity beyond the existing capacity of the Golden State’s grid.

To meet that demand, California and Texas would need to build new power plants or buy more electricity from neighboring states than they already do. The states might also need additional transmission and distribution infrastructure to accommodate new automotive charging infrastructure.

There's a number of flaws with this, it makes assumptions that aren't part of reality.  It assumes that everyone would plug-in and charge their vehicle at the same time.  I think everyone here can agree that would not be the case. 

Also, most modern chargers are, or have the capability to be, smart chargers.  They can be set up to only charge at the rate required to get to the desired level of charge by a specific time and during specific hours.  What do I mean by that? I'll give you the scenario... these numbers are made up for this illustration, but the actual numbers work the same way.

You drive your Tesla home from work and it has a 60% charge left.  You've had a long day and don't intend to go out again that evening when you get home at 6pm.  Because you want to preserve your battery health as long as possible, you've already set your Tesla to only charge up to 80% capacity.  You plug your car in at 6, but because you get a lower electricity rate starting at 11pm, your charger doesn't start charging the car until 11.  You tell the car that you want to be at 80% charge by 7am tomorrow.  Once the charger kicks in, it only charges at the rate required to get you to 80% at 7am when starting charging even though the charger can go faster. This is much better for the battery as slow charging is better.   So instead of running at the max 11.5 kWh, the Tesla charger will run at say, 8kWh. 

The reason the electric rate is cheap from 11pm to 6am is because that's when usage is lowest. It's the best time for EVs to charge. It takes a long time for power plants to ramp up and ramp down demand (unless they're NatGas Spiker units only used for unplanned spikes in demand).  So a lot of energy gets wasted during this low demand period.

A bunch of EVs charging at night would smooth out demand for utilities significantly.

Do we still need more capacity? Yes. Do we need as much as this article is claiming? No

  • Thanks 1
  • Upvote 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.




About us

CheersandGears.com - Founded 2001

We ♥ Cars

Get in touch

Follow us

Recent tweets

facebook

×
×
  • Create New...