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William Maley

Quick Drive: 2019 Mazda MX-5 Miata RF Club

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I’ll admit that I have an unabashed love for the Mazda MX-5 Miata. This plucky roadster proves you don’t need gobs of power to provide a big grin when driving. A combination of well-sorted chassis, steering, and slick gearbox does the trick. But Mazda has decided to add a bit more power for the 2019 model, along with including a more powerful four-cylinder and a hardtop option. I’m curious to see if these changes can make the Miata better or worse.

  • The model seen here is the RF - short for retractable fastback. Press the switch and the roof panels begin an origami folding exercise into the trunk. The result is a targa that provides the open-air feeling, minus a large amount of wind noise. It doesn’t hurt that roof pillars are styled in such a way that gives off a rakish look, no matter whether the top is up or down.
  • Under the hood lies a revised 2.0L Skyactiv four-cylinder with 181 horsepower and 151 pound-feet of torque - up 26 and 3 respectively. A six-speed manual is standard, while an automatic is optional.
  • The small bump makes for a huge improvement in overall acceleration. Just leaving a stop, I was surprised how much pull the engine had as it got to 45 about a half-second quicker than the last Miata. 
  •  A key change is Mazda bumping the redline to 7,500 rpm, which allows the engine to fully flex its muscle. This became apparent when I needed to pass a vehicle and found that I didn’t need to drop down a gear to get the power needed. 
  • The six-speed manual is still a joy to work with short and precise throws and a direct feeling clutch pedal. Even when stuck in traffic, doing the motions didn’t feel like a hassle.
  • Average fuel economy for the week landed around 32 mpg, even though I was winding the engine out and playing through the gears just because it is so much fun.
  • My tester was the Club model that adds a sport-tuned suspension with Bilstein shock absorbers, and a front shock tower brace. This firms up the suspension and provides improve handling on the limit. But out on the backroads, I couldn’t tell there was any real difference in handling between this and the 2016 MX-5 Grand Touring I drove a few years back. Maybe there was slightly less body roll in the RF, but both vehicles had similar characteristics when going into a turn. If I drove both of them on a track, then I think the differences would become more apparent.
  • There is a downside to the Club’s suspension, a very harsh ride. Just making a quick trip to the store was a bit much as the suspension would transmit every little bump and imperfection to the backside of those sitting inside.
  • Another item fitted to my tester was a set of Recaro bucket seats. They come as part of an option package that also adds Brembo Brakes and some cool-looking BBS wheels finished in black. The seats have increased bolstering to hold you in during an enthusiastic drive. But the lack of padding makes them uncomfortable for longer trips.
  • On paper, the RF is an expensive proposition when put against the soft-top: $32,345 vs. $25,730. That massive difference is due to Mazda not offering the base Sport model on the RF. But put the soft-top Club against the RF and the difference shrinks to just over $2,000. Be forewarned that the RF can get expensive. That package I mentioned earlier with the Recaro seats? That will set you back $4,670, bringing the as-tested price to just over $38,000.
  • Mazda’s improvements for the 2019 MX-5 Miata for the most part help, allowing it to become more fun to drive and somewhat easier to live with. That said, the additional cost of the hardtop will depend on whether or not you think it is worth the benefits of possibly being an all-seasons car.

Disclaimer: Mazda Provided the MX-5 Miata RF, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas

Year: 2019
Make: Mazda
Model: MX-5 Miata RF
Trim: Club
Engine: 2.0L SkyActiv-G DOHC 16-Valve with VVT Four-Cylinder
Driveline: Six-Speed Manual, Rear-Wheel Drive
Horsepower @ RPM: 181 @ 7,000
Torque @ RPM: 151 @ 4,000
Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 26/34/29
Curb Weight: 2,453 lbs
Location of Manufacture: Hiroshima, Japan
Base Price: $32,345
As Tested Price: $38,335 (Includes $895.00 Destination Charge)

Options:
Brembo with Black Roof - $4,670.00
Interior Package for M/T - $425.00


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Sharp looking 2 door coupe that will please those looking for such a small car.

Price is actually not bad considering all the $50K compact CUVs out there today.

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I drove the soft top with the extra power and I too was surprised by how much difference such a little difference made. 

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On 9/12/2019 at 7:34 PM, Drew Dowdell said:

Also @William Maley, why do you always get Miatas in Detroit in the Winter?!

I wish that I could give you answer to that.

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22 hours ago, William Maley said:

I wish that I could give you answer to that.

Maybe trying to give you some sunshine during heavy snow days? 🤔

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      Make: Volkswagen
      Model: Arteon
      Trim: SEL w/4Motion
      Engine: 2.0L DOHC Turbocharged Direct Injected 4-cylinder
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      Horsepower: 268
      Torque @ RPM: 258 @ 0 - 3,600
      Curb Weight: 3,655 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Emden, Germany
      Base Price: $35,845
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