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Drew Dowdell

Ask Me Anything: 2019 Mazda CX-5 Signature Turbo

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In this week for a review is a 2019 Mazda CX-5 Signature with the turbocharged 2.5-liter Skyactiv-G engine.  This engine is shared with the Mazda CX-9 and Mazda 6 Turbo and produces 227 horsepower and 310 lb.-ft of torque on regular gasoline, but bumps up to 250 horsepower on 93 octane. All-wheel drive is standard.

This is the most loaded of the CX-5 trims with only the paint ($300) and rear bumper guard ($125) as additional charges.  That brings the MSRP to $38,360 after destination charges. 

What do you want to know about this Mazda while I have it for a week?  Let me know in the comments below. 

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Would you buy it with your own money if you were on the market for such crossover?

How it accelerates in CX-5 (vs CX-9)?  Turbo lag noticeable?

Is active safety overly annoying and interfering?

 

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Fan of the black headliner/dark everywhere interior tone on the Signature?

 

 

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Is that dash all soft touch or is the section over the gauges and the bulk of the dash hard plastic like it looks with just a soft touch few inch curved section? How is the rest of the interior on this black hole interior?

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2 hours ago, frogger said:

Fan of the black headliner/dark everywhere interior tone on the Signature?

 

 

The seats are actually a very dark brown, but you're right, it is rather dark in there. I don't mind an all black interior.  

1 hour ago, dfelt said:

Is that dash all soft touch or is the section over the gauges and the bulk of the dash hard plastic like it looks with just a soft touch few inch curved section? How is the rest of the interior on this black hole interior?

The dash is a very stiff rubberized product on the top, and softer materials on the face of the dash.  I will say the seats are pretty comfortable and I found a good position really quick.  Plenty of legroom in the driver seat, I can't touch the firewall with my feet when the seat is adjusted for me.  I'll go over the interior a bit more when it's not raining buckets here... probably over the weekend. 

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2 hours ago, ykX said:

Would you buy it with your own money if you were on the market for such crossover?

How it accelerates in CX-5 (vs CX-9)?  Turbo lag noticeable?

Is active safety overly annoying and interfering?

 

Yes there is turbo lag, it doesn't have the instant on of a V6, however it still feels really quick.  There aren't many speedy options in this class. The best sellers don't have an uplevel engine.  The only other real choice with this kinda power is the GM triplets with the 2.0T.  They have less torque, but they've got 3 more gears to work with, so they also feel really fast.  Unfortunately, that's probably going away when they get the new 2.0T, so in the very near future, this could end up being the most powerful small crossover you can buy that isn't a luxury brand.

The active safety is very subtle... maybe even too subtle.  It's neat that it can read the road signs. It updates the speed limit in the heads up display as you pass the sign. It also puts up a stop sign as you approach. 

Would I buy one with my own money? I'll get back to you on that, but I'd venture probably not based on the interior size.  CR-V and Terrain feel a lot larger inside than this and I would be looking for space in my next vehicle. 

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I find the high-pitched sound of a Mazda Skyactiv engine offputting when it is in cold idle mode.  Have you noticed the shrill tone on cold start-up, or is it just me?

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8 minutes ago, ocnblu said:

I find the high-pitched sound of a Mazda Skyactiv engine offputting when it is in cold idle mode.  Have you noticed the shrill tone on cold start-up, or is it just me?

I haven't let it get cold enough to notice. 🙂  I'll try and take note in the morning. 

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53 minutes ago, Drew Dowdell said:

The seats are actually a very dark brown, but you're right, it is rather dark in there. I don't mind an all black interior.  

I didn't mind but my wife really didn't like that aspect of the signature trim when we were car shopping last month, and our 5 year old agreed :).

 

 

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I had this out on about 50 miles of highway driving last night, and I will say it feels a lot more nimble than your typical small crossover.

@ocnblu I don't hear the sound you're talking about at cold start. 

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On 10/31/2019 at 7:12 PM, ocnblu said:

I find the high-pitched sound of a Mazda Skyactiv engine offputting when it is in cold idle mode.  Have you noticed the shrill tone on cold start-up, or is it just me?

are you talking about how it idles high to warm up the CAT for 10-20 seconds?

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35 minutes ago, frogger said:

How is the fuel economy working out?

Mostly city driving the computer says I'm getting 24 mpg.

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4 hours ago, loki said:

are you talking about how it idles high to warm up the CAT for 10-20 seconds?

Yup

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You know what's strange, I only just figured out that the infotainment system is touchscreen.... that is, it's touch screen for everything except Android Auto.  AA must be controlled with the rotary knob only which is very frustrating.  Apple CarPlay isn't much better because the touch screen is laggy to respond.

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Overall thoughts vs the current CR-V?  Love the look of the Mazda, but no local dealer and I 💙 my Honda’s. 

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I feel like the turbo was a good move here, because before the only option was a 184 hp, 180ish lb-ft engine, which isn't a lot for an SUV when with people in it is probably 4,000 lbs.  

A lot of this segment is 1 engine choice, and maybe 2, but I don't get when when this is probably the largest segment in the industry now.  You'd think car makers would have more choices for powertrain, interior colors, option packs, etc.  Almost every vehicle in this segment should have a base 4, a turbo 4 and a hybrid option.

There wasn't a question in there, but I guess I'd have to ask if the turbo is worth the extra money over the base motor?  I tend to think the optional engine is always worth the money, unless it is a car where the base engine is like 500 hp, then different story.

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12 minutes ago, ocnblu said:

Yup

is it just frequency of the ~1500rpm idle, or that it happened whenever you(or other) started it?  sometimes, for mine, it could be 2 hours later and it wouldn't need to high idle yet. I was told when i bought it, that i didn't have to let it go through that cycle, but i typically let it do it be cause it'll take me that long to get situated and buckled in,

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11 hours ago, loki said:

is it just frequency of the ~1500rpm idle, or that it happened whenever you(or other) started it?  sometimes, for mine, it could be 2 hours later and it wouldn't need to high idle yet. I was told when i bought it, that i didn't have to let it go through that cycle, but i typically let it do it be cause it'll take me that long to get situated and buckled in,

Just that cold idle engine sound, I don't know, it just sounds different than every other 4 I've heard under the same conditions.  Maybe I have dog ears or something.

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I love the look of this one for Mazda, not so much for the new Escape.

the AA button sounds like a major pain.....

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Well the CX-5 went back to Mazda this morning. I'll have my full review up on Monday, plus possibly my first video review to follow. Next up will be the Hyundai Palisade the week of U.S. Thanksgiving.

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