Jump to content
balthazar

• PROJECTS •

Recommended Posts

Well, the current 'house arrest' scenario across the country is going to force folk to amuse themselves in new ways, perhaps trying something new or different.  So this here thread might be a spot to post up some 'projects' people are working on, even if little stuff, to pass the time productively.

I had this '50s school desk for prob 12 years now- came from a garage clean-out. Super clean, but I advertised it a few times and took it to a swap meet a few years ago- plenty look but there's no takers. So (because it's not built for adult-sized humanoids) I tossed the top and cut the steel post off, now I have a lil shop chair. It's not too low for adult humanoids to sit on, tho it's not what you'd call incredibly comfortable. If I end up never using it, I'll toss it, but here's a chance at a 2nd life.

Whatcha workin on?

50s desk1 copy.JPG

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^ A few hours after I cut the above desk, rendering it a mere chair, someone contacted me to see if it was still available. 🥴

- - - - -

Had one of those upholstered office desk chairs by a front window. The seat fabric was split up but the cats like to sit on it to look out the window. Have a dumpster on site, so tossed the bulky office chair and slapped a quick platform together for the cats instead. Scrap plywood Sanded smooth, Eucalyptus rods from someone’s wall exercise apparatus, with a bracket to the underside of the window sill. A quickie. 

31B47626-C5AF-4C2B-8398-793EA0B1D372.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My son & his girlfriend had this 'drunk monkey' pic they liked, so I whipped out a frame made from lathe I had in stock- it came out of a house that got gutted of it's plaster because the homeowner 'hates cracks in plaster', so we drywalled the entire 3-story house, originally built in 1880.

IMG_1437.jpg

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This was my mother's 'painting box'- it's prolly from the 50s. Certainly not a quality piece... but thought I'd at least make it structural again. Top & bottom are plywood, which was all coming delaminated. So over a period of evenings, I glued & clamped it various ways, plus used wood filler in some sports. Had to repair the rear of the lid where a jagged section was missing, making the hinge on that side non-functional. Anyway- it's back together. Mom (& dad) paint regularly, but I don't expect she'll use it, but maybe she'll enjoy having it again; she has a studio room down her basement (I think it's been in my stash of stuff for over 10 years now).

IMG_1444.jpg

IMG_1443.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

=============>

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

An original floor mat out of my now-gone ‘64 Catalina. It was torn across the top (2 pieces), so rather than just toss it, i made some low-brow wall art: 

772D5C65-4B8E-4E1B-BAA2-385EB40A413F.jpeg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/21/2020 at 2:19 PM, balthazar said:

Well, the current 'house arrest' scenario across the country is going to force folk to amuse themselves in new ways, perhaps trying something new or different.  So this here thread might be a spot to post up some 'projects' people are working on, even if little stuff, to pass the time productively.

I had this '50s school desk for prob 12 years now- came from a garage clean-out. Super clean, but I advertised it a few times and took it to a swap meet a few years ago- plenty look but there's no takers. So (because it's not built for adult-sized humanoids) I tossed the top and cut the steel post off, now I have a lil shop chair. It's not too low for adult humanoids to sit on, tho it's not what you'd call incredibly comfortable. If I end up never using it, I'll toss it, but here's a chance at a 2nd life.

Whatcha workin on?

50s desk1 copy.JPG

I remember using that style of desk in elementary school in the late 70s.  Same details.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Now that the weather is getting springy, I'm doing a few projects around the house and outside.  Installed kick plates on the lower part of the door leading to the basement (the dogs have eaten away large parts of the wood).  A temporary fix until I replace the door w/ a steel one.    

The screen door on the side entrance to my garage opens very roughly, something wrong about the aluminum door frame and how it meets the door..too tight.  Removed the frame side, redrilled the mounting holes to move it further from the opening by maybe 1/2 inch.need to reshape it or file some on the edge of the door so they don't bind when the door is shut tightly.   Got some mulch, top soil, fertilizer and grass seed to work on building up a low spot in the yard and re-seed some bare spots...working on ideas for places to plant additional trees...

If I could be 1/10th as good of a handyman my Dad was, I'd be happy..he was so good with all sorts of tools and had a lot of common sense and practical skills..he could bleed brakes, set timing, do bodywork, install bathrooms, rewire a house, bee keeping, planting orchards, etc all while being a school administrator. . working w/ tools and stuff is still pretty unnatural to me.

Edited by Robert Hall
  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe it is a '70s piece... or they hung around that long.
Now they probably have a contracted mandate to replace all school desks every 2 years.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, balthazar said:

Maybe it is a '70s piece... or they hung around that long.
Now they probably have a contracted mandate to replace all school desks every 2 years.

They probably hung around that long.  I remember seeing that type of desk in my high school. . . . . in 1989.  Schools do not replace desks every two years because it is simply too expensive to do that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, balthazar said:

Maybe it is a '70s piece... or they hung around that long.
Now they probably have a contracted mandate to replace all school desks every 2 years.

I'm sure they hung around a long time..my elementary school dated from around 1900, had a lot of old furniture when I was there in the late 70s.   Alas, it was torn down for building a new school in the early 00s.  Alas, every school I went to from kindergarten through high school no longer exists..all been torn down and replaced  with modern prison-style schools. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, riviera74 said:

Schools do not replace desks every two years because it is simply too expensive to do that.

I was being facetious.

But you should see the recently-new high school near me. World's most inefficient footprint, marble & oak inside, cost $185 million to build, still spits out the same ratio of under-achieving graduates vs. flunk-outs as the old school. But the politicians involved can put it on their resumes all the same.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I miss my high school..it was a campus w/ about 10 single-story buildings in Marathon, Florida..had it's own beach on the Atlantic.  I think the buildings dated from the 30s, no heat, no A/C, just jalousie windows open w/ the ocean breeze blowing through.    In the 90s it was razed and replaced w/ a modern hurricane-proof monstrosity, all locked down w/ gates and looking like a prison rather than a school 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the only place in my HS that had A/C was the library. Single building, still there, It was built in '58.

It'd be cool to walk it again, but I don't really miss it. Some of the girls tho, I do miss them. Time has a way of fucking that all up, tho. I looked a few of them up online. Yikes. [I reserve the right to be quietly and -at times- savagely judgemental].

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, balthazar said:

It'd be cool to walk it again, but I don't really miss it. Some of the girls tho, I do miss them. Time has a way of fucking that all up, tho. I looked a few of them up online. Yikes. [I reserve the right to be quietly and -at times- savagely judgemental].

Time has a way of doing that.  Some people look barely older after 30+ years, some unrecognizable.  And looking at my yearbooks, those 80s hairstyles and fashions... 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This

1 hour ago, Robert Hall said:

If I could be 1/10th as good of a handyman my Dad was, I'd be happy..he was so good with all sorts of tools and had a lot of common sense and practical skills..he could bleed brakes, set timing, do bodywork, install bathrooms, rewire a house, bee keeping, planting orchards, etc all while being a school administrator. . working w/ tools and stuff is still pretty unnatural to me.

Sounds like you're doing OK!
If you can look at a problem and envision how it needs to be repaired, all you need after that is some experience with tools & stuff and you can do it. Tools are the easier of the 2 'prongs'; understanding how things go together/come apart and how structure works is harder.

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

These are the neighbor's white pines. The ground stays wet often right where they are, and white pines have poor root structure; in wet ground with strong winds they go over. This is the latest one to start flirting with the ground from afar. I put a car ratchet strap on it - it's rated to 10,000 lbs so it should hold. But the tree has to go; now to get the neighbor to pay for it.

IMG_1448.jpg

For a sense of scale, I'd say that yellow strap is about 14' in the air.

Edited by balthazar
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Started working on my garden and my winter Garlic are popping up. I also got new veggie starts planted in the green house. Need to take a pic.

20200326_124320.jpg

20200326_124333.jpg

  • Upvote 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@dfelt You don't have animals eating your garden?  We have bunch of rabbits and deer goes around occasionally too that will decimate any garden without protective netting. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
On 3/27/2020 at 8:04 PM, Robert Hall said:

If I could be 1/10th as good of a handyman my Dad was, I'd be happy..he was so good with all sorts of tools and had a lot of common sense and practical skills..he could bleed brakes, set timing, do bodywork, install bathrooms, rewire a house, bee keeping, planting orchards, etc all while being a school administrator. . working w/ tools and stuff is still pretty unnatural to me.

I wish I was also 1/10th as good as my dad as a handy man. 

My dad was born in 1926.  Folks then...whether they were adults in 1926, or were born in 1926, all had to BE handymen. It was a necessity. It was THE way of life. No choice.  Many reasons as to why that was.

My dad was a soldier during the 2nd World War. The Canadian infantry and the war taught him very valuable handyman and survival techniques.    

My dad joined the USAAF in 1950. He went to Korea.  He was a Staff Sergeant.  He was taught many trades while being with the USAAF.  Car mechanics.  Generator mechanics. Aviation mechanics. Electrician.  Plumbing.  Wood working. Metal working.  He had to improvise on how to fix things with the scarce materials he had, etc...

I learned many things from him.  How to check if brakes are good. Drum brakes, disc brakes. How to flush the radiator. If Im stuck, without coolant, to use water....in fact...before there was antifreeze, water was THE way to cool your car. He told me stories on how all owners of cars then used to flush the water out at night so it wont freeze over night...hence the name anti-freeze...

I observed and learned how to fix things. Learned how to use tools.  Problem is...I NEVER put that into practice...so now...without his guidance, I am not 100% sure of myself on how to approach handyman stuff.  I do the easy things around the house, but I will not tackle the more laborious stuff.  

Example:  In Quebec, you need a license to perform electrical stuff, because if you mess up and cause an electrical fire, you wont be paid insurance money and might even be pursued in a court of law. My dad had no electrician license, but he did all renovation electrical stuff on his own in his home,  but he knew what to do...   Plumbing same thing.    Well....I will never touch that...

Like I said...Ill do easy stuff.  Ill fix a leaky faucet.  I wont change the entire sink reconnecting the hoses and drains and stuff. Ill know what to do, on how to cut the hole in the wood cabinet to fit the sink in, how to caulk it properly, etc, but Id rather not. 

Ill caulk and re-caulk the bathtub,  I wont install a new one.  Ill change a old lighting fixture for a new one. I wont re-wire...   Although I understand what needs to be done electricity wise concerning amperage and voltage and what breakers to use and the like...

 Lack of confidence, maybe?  

I can cut wood. Measure twice and cut once. I could screw and glue it together to make a project or two. But I lack that confidence to do so. 

 

Edited by oldshurst442
  • Upvote 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
18 minutes ago, oldshurst442 said:

I wish I was also 1/10th as good as my dad as a handy man. 

My dad was born in 1926.  Folks then...whether they were adults in 1926, or were born in 1926, all had to BE handymen. It was a necessity. It was THE way of life. No choice.  Many reasons as to why that was.

My dad was a soldier during the 2nd World War. The Canadian infantry and the war taught him very valuable handyman and survival techniques.    

My dad joined the USAAF in 1950. He went to Korea.  He was a Staff Sergeant.  He was taught many trades while being with the USAAF.  Car mechanics.  Generator mechanics. Aviation mechanics. Electrician.  Plumbing.  Wood working. Metal working.  He had to improvise on how to fix things with the scarce materials he had, etc...

I learned many things from him.  How to check if brakes are good. Drum brakes, disc brakes. How to flush the radiator. If Im stuck, without coolant, to use water....in fact...before there was antifreeze, water was THE way to cool your car. He told me stories on how all owners of cars then used to flush the water out at night so it wont freeze over night...hence the name anti-freeze...

I observed and learned how to fix things. Learned how to use tools.  Problem is...I NEVER put that into practice...so now...without his guidance, I am not 100% sure of myself on how to approach handyman stuff.  I do the easy things around the house, but I will not tackle the more laborious stuff.  

 

My Dad was born in 1921, spent WWII in the US Army Air Corps stationed at Miami Army Airfield..spent the war there and in the Caribbean, stayed in until '46, then went to the U of Kentucky on the GI Bill for college and grad school.  He worked in an airplane factory in Baltimore before the war (Martin?).   Very handy guy, could do anything w/ tools it seemed....furnace installations, roofing, framing and sheetrock, etc.   I learned how to dig and install septic tanks, paint a barn, remove an engine, bleed brakes... though  I haven't had to use those skills because at an early age I really wanted to be an academic (which led to my long time in grad school and career in IT). 

I dug so many ditches as a kid...'family drainage projects'.    And so much mowing (6 acres out of 150 were usually treated as lawn). 

 

Edited by Robert Hall
  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, ykX said:

@dfelt You don't have animals eating your garden?  We have bunch of rabbits and deer goes around occasionally too that will decimate any garden without protective netting. 

Squirrels are the problem here, so once I have everything ready, I then put up a green plastic fence for keeping the squirrels out. No dear in this area, too suburban and no rabbits either here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Robert Hall said:

My Dad was born in 1921, spent WWII in the US Army Air Corps stationed at Miami Army Airfield..spent the war there and in the Caribbean, stayed in until '46, then went to the U of Kentucky on the GI Bill for college and grad school.  He worked in an airplane factory in Baltimore before the war (Martin?).   Very handy guy, could do anything w/ tools it seemed....furnace installations, roofing, framing and sheetrock, etc.   I learned how to dig and install septic tanks, paint a barn, remove an engine, bleed brakes... though  I haven't had to use those skills because at an early age I really wanted to be an academic (which led to my long time in grad school and career in IT). 

I dug so many ditches as a kid...'family drainage projects'.    And so much mowing (6 acres out of 150 were usually treated as lawn). 

 

Totally respect what you and @oldshurst442 have said about your fathers. I grew up with a father that said tools never fail, you only fail if you do not learn and take care of the tools to take care of you.

Learned to do electrical, plumbing, yards, etc. nothing I could not do as my parents would buy a house, move in, fix it up and then a few years later move onto another project. As such, when I bought my foreclosed home in 1999, I gutted it and redid everything from the roof to insulation, plumbing, electrical, sheet rock, taping, mudding, etc. The only things I paid to have done on the house was the following due to not wanting to destroy my own body or it really is a special skill to get it right.

  • Flooring /  Carpeting paid to have it done.
  • Kitchen cabinets and counters, real skill to get it square and perfect.
  • Windows, due to being a split level house, easier to pay someone to bring in the scaffolding and put in the windows. Helped my dad do enough growing up that I can pass on that.
  • Commercial grade steel rebar 6" thick cement driveway

The rest of the house was me, so confident I can pretty much do anything though as I get older, easier to pay the younger folks to do the heavy lifting.

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess my father had me earlier than you guys; he was born in '41. His father was a career cabinet maker & union carpenter, he could build or restore anything out of wood.

My father is a retired mechanical / aerospace engineer. He did plenty of projects on our houses (patios, paneling, brickwork, etc), I would say he's pretty well mechanically inclined, but he hasn't really pursued that avenue over the years. He worked for the Department of the Navy at the Jet Propulsion Lab, so he was exempt from what would've been Vietnam for him.

I went to school / worked for 10-11 years in graphic design, then jumped to construction / excavation. In the contracting/carpentry field for 20 years now, I have done everything from digging basements to roofing and EVERYTHING in between. I'll do electrical short of going into the panel box, and I'll do plumbing short of soldering/ the supply side. Have done many toilets & tubs. I never took any courses, tho I did learn working the 7 years I did with my brother. I would see how a job was done and pretty much 'boom'; I could do it.

I think it was growing up around my grandfather that gave me an appreciation & respect for tools. That, and I've always been a vintage car nut, so that pretty much demands those skills.

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I took the body off the frame on my B-59, never knew anyone before that that did that job. I may have read one article in a car magazine. Seemed common-sensical to me. I also fabricated / welded the dolly its on in the below pic :

B-59 16.jpg

  • Like 2
  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.




About us

CheersandGears.com - Founded 2001

We ♥ Cars

Get in touch

Follow us

Recent tweets

facebook

×
×
  • Create New...