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Found 203 results

  1. Volkswagen has already missed one deadline set by U.S. District Judge Charles Breyer on reaching a deal with the U.S. Government over the diesel emission scandal. Breyer has given them a second deadline of April 21st. Now the administrator of the EPA worries they could miss the second one. Speaking to reporters at a breakfast, EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy said she has concerns about the two groups being able to reach a deal before the deadline. "I wouldn't take any single signal as the direction of those negotiations or where any final agreement - if we reach one - will end up," said McCarthy. If an agreement isn't reached by April 21st, Breyer has said he would consider bringing this to trial over the summer. Source: Reuters
  2. Volkswagen has already missed one deadline set by U.S. District Judge Charles Breyer on reaching a deal with the U.S. Government over the diesel emission scandal. Breyer has given them a second deadline of April 21st. Now the administrator of the EPA worries they could miss the second one. Speaking to reporters at a breakfast, EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy said she has concerns about the two groups being able to reach a deal before the deadline. "I wouldn't take any single signal as the direction of those negotiations or where any final agreement - if we reach one - will end up," said McCarthy. If an agreement isn't reached by April 21st, Breyer has said he would consider bringing this to trial over the summer. Source: Reuters View full article
  3. Another day, another lawsuit for Volkswagen over the diesel emission scandal. The U.S. Federal Trade Commission filed a lawsuit today in U.S. District Court in San Francisco against Volkswagen of America for false advertising. The suit says Volkswagen claimed in ads their diesel vehicles were clean, when actually they were polluting more thanks to illegal software. "For years Volkswagen's ads touted the company's 'Clean Diesel' cars even though it now appears Volkswagen rigged the cars with devices designed to defeat emissions tests," FTC Chairwoman Edith Ramirez said in a statement. The FTC also says in the filing that consumers in the U.S. suffered "billions of dollars in injury" as a result of the illegal software. For many years, Volkswagen promoted their "clean diesel" message through various mediums - print, television, and online ads. The ads were targeted at “environmentally-conscious” consumers. Automotive News says the FTC is seeking a court order to force Volkswagen to compensate U.S. consumers who bought a diesel vehicle and an injunction to prevent the automaker doing this again. Volkswagen spokeswoman Jeannine Ginivan tells Automotive News that the automaker has received the complaint and "continues to cooperate" with all U.S. regulators. Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required), Federal Trade Commission Press Release is on Page 2 FTC Charges Volkswagen Deceived Consumers with its "Clean Diesel" Campaign Seeks Compensation for Those Who Bought or Leased Affected VW and Audi Vehicles over Seven-Year Period March 29, 2016 The Federal Trade Commission has charged that Volkswagen Group of America, Inc. deceived consumers with the advertising campaign it used to promote its supposedly "clean diesel" VWs and Audis, which Volkswagen fitted with illegal emission defeat devices designed to mask high emissions during government tests. The FTC is seeking a court order requiring Volkswagen to compensate American consumers who bought or leased an affected vehicle between late 2008 and late 2015, as well as an injunction to prevent Volkswagen from engaging in this type of conduct again. In a complaint filed in federal court, the FTC alleges that during this seven-year period Volkswagen deceived consumers by selling or leasing more than 550,000 diesel cars based on false claims that the cars were low-emission, environmentally friendly, met emissions standards and would maintain a high resale value. The cars sold for an average price of approximately $28,000. "For years Volkswagen's ads touted the company's 'Clean Diesel' cars even though it now appears Volkswagen rigged the cars with devices designed to defeat emissions tests," said FTC Chairwoman Edith Ramirez. "Our lawsuit seeks compensation for the consumers who bought affected cars based on Volkswagen's deceptive and unfair practices." According to the FTC's complaint, Volkswagen promoted its supposedly "clean" cars through a high-profile marketing campaign that included Super Bowl ads, online social media campaigns, and print advertising, often targeting "environmentally-conscious" consumers. For example, Volkswagen promotional materials repeatedly claimed that its "Clean Diesel" vehicles have low emissions, including that they reduce nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions by 90 percent and have fewer such emissions than gasoline cars. In fact, the FTC's complaint states that they emit up to 4,000 percent more than the legal limit of NOx — a dangerous pollutant that contributes to environmental harms and respiratory ailments. The complaint alleges that Volkswagen also claimed that "Clean Diesel" vehicles met "stringent emission requirements," were "50-state compliant," and would maintain a high resale value. Yet, according to the FTC's complaint, these claims were also false because without the illegally installed software, the "Clean Diesel" vehicles would not have passed federal emissions standards and the hidden defeat devices will significantly reduce the vehicles' resale value. The FTC also charged that Volkswagen provided the means and instrumentalities for others to deceive consumers, and that installing the emissions defeat devices was an unfair practice. The affected vehicles include 2009 through 2015 Volkswagen TDI diesel models of Jettas, Passats, and Touareg SUVs, as well as TDI Audi models. The suggested sale prices for the affected vehicles ranged from approximately $22,000 for the least-expensive Volkswagen model with a 2.0-liter engine to approximately $125,000 for the most-expensive Audi model with 3.0-liter engine. The Commission vote authorizing the staff to file the complaint was 4-0. The complaint was filed in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California, San Francisco Division. NOTE: The Commission files a complaint when it has "reason to believe" that the law has been or is being violated and it appears to the Commission that a proceeding is in the public interest. The case will be decided by the court. The Federal Trade Commission works to promote competition, and protect and educate consumers. You can learn more about consumer topics and file a consumer complaint online or by calling 1-877-FTC-HELP (382-4357). Like the FTC on Facebook (link is external), follow us on Twitter (link is external), read our blogs and subscribe to press releases for the latest FTC news and resources.
  4. Another day, another lawsuit for Volkswagen over the diesel emission scandal. The U.S. Federal Trade Commission filed a lawsuit today in U.S. District Court in San Francisco against Volkswagen of America for false advertising. The suit says Volkswagen claimed in ads their diesel vehicles were clean, when actually they were polluting more thanks to illegal software. "For years Volkswagen's ads touted the company's 'Clean Diesel' cars even though it now appears Volkswagen rigged the cars with devices designed to defeat emissions tests," FTC Chairwoman Edith Ramirez said in a statement. The FTC also says in the filing that consumers in the U.S. suffered "billions of dollars in injury" as a result of the illegal software. For many years, Volkswagen promoted their "clean diesel" message through various mediums - print, television, and online ads. The ads were targeted at “environmentally-conscious” consumers. Automotive News says the FTC is seeking a court order to force Volkswagen to compensate U.S. consumers who bought a diesel vehicle and an injunction to prevent the automaker doing this again. Volkswagen spokeswoman Jeannine Ginivan tells Automotive News that the automaker has received the complaint and "continues to cooperate" with all U.S. regulators. Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required), Federal Trade Commission Press Release is on Page 2 FTC Charges Volkswagen Deceived Consumers with its "Clean Diesel" Campaign Seeks Compensation for Those Who Bought or Leased Affected VW and Audi Vehicles over Seven-Year Period March 29, 2016 The Federal Trade Commission has charged that Volkswagen Group of America, Inc. deceived consumers with the advertising campaign it used to promote its supposedly "clean diesel" VWs and Audis, which Volkswagen fitted with illegal emission defeat devices designed to mask high emissions during government tests. The FTC is seeking a court order requiring Volkswagen to compensate American consumers who bought or leased an affected vehicle between late 2008 and late 2015, as well as an injunction to prevent Volkswagen from engaging in this type of conduct again. In a complaint filed in federal court, the FTC alleges that during this seven-year period Volkswagen deceived consumers by selling or leasing more than 550,000 diesel cars based on false claims that the cars were low-emission, environmentally friendly, met emissions standards and would maintain a high resale value. The cars sold for an average price of approximately $28,000. "For years Volkswagen's ads touted the company's 'Clean Diesel' cars even though it now appears Volkswagen rigged the cars with devices designed to defeat emissions tests," said FTC Chairwoman Edith Ramirez. "Our lawsuit seeks compensation for the consumers who bought affected cars based on Volkswagen's deceptive and unfair practices." According to the FTC's complaint, Volkswagen promoted its supposedly "clean" cars through a high-profile marketing campaign that included Super Bowl ads, online social media campaigns, and print advertising, often targeting "environmentally-conscious" consumers. For example, Volkswagen promotional materials repeatedly claimed that its "Clean Diesel" vehicles have low emissions, including that they reduce nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions by 90 percent and have fewer such emissions than gasoline cars. In fact, the FTC's complaint states that they emit up to 4,000 percent more than the legal limit of NOx — a dangerous pollutant that contributes to environmental harms and respiratory ailments. The complaint alleges that Volkswagen also claimed that "Clean Diesel" vehicles met "stringent emission requirements," were "50-state compliant," and would maintain a high resale value. Yet, according to the FTC's complaint, these claims were also false because without the illegally installed software, the "Clean Diesel" vehicles would not have passed federal emissions standards and the hidden defeat devices will significantly reduce the vehicles' resale value. The FTC also charged that Volkswagen provided the means and instrumentalities for others to deceive consumers, and that installing the emissions defeat devices was an unfair practice. The affected vehicles include 2009 through 2015 Volkswagen TDI diesel models of Jettas, Passats, and Touareg SUVs, as well as TDI Audi models. The suggested sale prices for the affected vehicles ranged from approximately $22,000 for the least-expensive Volkswagen model with a 2.0-liter engine to approximately $125,000 for the most-expensive Audi model with 3.0-liter engine. The Commission vote authorizing the staff to file the complaint was 4-0. The complaint was filed in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California, San Francisco Division. NOTE: The Commission files a complaint when it has "reason to believe" that the law has been or is being violated and it appears to the Commission that a proceeding is in the public interest. The case will be decided by the court. The Federal Trade Commission works to promote competition, and protect and educate consumers. You can learn more about consumer topics and file a consumer complaint online or by calling 1-877-FTC-HELP (382-4357). Like the FTC on Facebook (link is external), follow us on Twitter (link is external), read our blogs and subscribe to press releases for the latest FTC news and resources. View full article
  5. Towards the end of February, U.S. District Judge Charles Breyer gave Volkswagen a deadline. On March 24th, the German automaker would have to give a definitive answer on the status of a fix for nearly 600,000 diesel vehicles. At a hearing this week, Breyer has moved the deadline to April 21st. According to Reuters, both the EPA and Volkswagen said at the hearing they are making progress on a reaching an agreement. But there are still a number of issues to work out. A possible issue is whether the EPA would accept a partial fix on some Volkswagen diesel vehicles. Earlier this month, an official from CARB said it might not be possible for Volkswagen to fully fix some of the diesel models involved in the scandal. But Judge Breyer told Volkswagen this was their only extension. If they don't reach a deal with the EPA by April 21st, Breyer would bring this issue to a trial. Source: Reuters View full article
  6. Towards the end of February, U.S. District Judge Charles Breyer gave Volkswagen a deadline. On March 24th, the German automaker would have to give a definitive answer on the status of a fix for nearly 600,000 diesel vehicles. At a hearing this week, Breyer has moved the deadline to April 21st. According to Reuters, both the EPA and Volkswagen said at the hearing they are making progress on a reaching an agreement. But there are still a number of issues to work out. A possible issue is whether the EPA would accept a partial fix on some Volkswagen diesel vehicles. Earlier this month, an official from CARB said it might not be possible for Volkswagen to fully fix some of the diesel models involved in the scandal. But Judge Breyer told Volkswagen this was their only extension. If they don't reach a deal with the EPA by April 21st, Breyer would bring this issue to a trial. Source: Reuters
  7. Over the past six months and numerous articles with the ‘As the Diesel Emits’ in the title, we are no closer to have a fix for the around 600,000 Volkswagen diesel vehicles with illegal emission software. Instead, we have been treated a first-rate performance of ‘How not to handle a crisis’. From Volkswagen’s delay of admitting the illegal software to CEO Matthias Muller seeming very oblivious to what happening in an interview. It seems the German automaker is getting one black eye after another. The past month or so has seen the crisis cranked up to eleven. New documents revealed that senior managers, including former CEO Martin Winterkorn, were alerted about the U.S. probing some of their TDI models back in 2014 This was followed up by a letter from last year alerting Winterkorn that the Volkswagen did use a defeat device in their diesel models - two weeks before the official EPA announcement. A U.S. Federal Judge has given Volkswagen until March 24th to give an answer on where they stand on a possible fix. Volkswagen of America CEO and President Michael Horn suddenly stepped down from his position. With Horn’s departure, dealers want answers as to what happens next or a mutiny could happen. Ever since this scandal came to light, there has been a question that has been floating around in my head: Does Volkswagen know how much trouble it is in? On the surface, it seems they do and are trying their best to rectify this issue. But dig a little bit further and there are very troubling signs. For example, the Associate Press last week learned from a couple people that Volkswagen’s management in Germany resisted the plan set by Horn to offer $1,000 in gift cards to owners as a gesture of goodwill. Thankfully management relented and the program was instituted. Then there was Volkswagen’s first proposal to fix the affected vehicles in the U.S. which got rejected by the California Air Resources Board as it was “incomplete, substantially deficient and fall far short of meeting the legal requirements to return these vehicles” to compliance. Since then, Volkswagen has been working on a new solution to present to CARB and the EPA, though we haven’t heard anything about it. These concerns bring up another question about Volkswagen: Do they know what their place in America is? Last September, Automobile Magazine ran an excellent editorial titled Volkswagen Has Never Understood its Place in the U.S. In the piece, the author argues that Volkswagen is seen by many Americans as something out of the mainstream - original Beetle, Microbus, Golf GTI, and their diesel lineup. Because of this, Volkswagen has a small, but loyal fanbase, But Volkswagen sees themselves as something different; a mass-market brand capable of selling many vehicles around. Except in the U.S. A few years ago, Volkswagen set an ambitious goal of selling 800,000 vehicles in the U.S. by 2018. To achieve this goal, the automaker decided to build vehicles tailored to the marketplace. What we ended up with was a Passat and Jetta that were appealing as stale bread because that is what the company thought would sell. At first, the strategy worked as sales of Volkswagen vehicles increased. But in the past couple of years, sales have dropped precipitously. The company has been scratching their heads as to why this is happening. It goes back to Volkswagen not understanding their place in the U.S. That last sentence can be extended further into the diesel emission crisis. The way Volkswagen has handled this crisis is nothing short of disastrous. If you are a company dealing with a massive crisis, the key thing you should be doing is keeping everyone somewhat abreast of what is happening. Volkswagen has barely done this and has given the impression that they are really not doing anything, despite all of the reports saying Volkswagen is conducting an internal investigation and working on a fix. This one quote from the Automobile Magazine editorial partly sums the predicament Volkswagen finds itself in. “That left the small clique of devoted enthusiasts, folks who bought Volkswagens because they were Volkswagens, and often because they were Volkswagen “clean” diesels. These are precisely the people Volkswagen just kicked in the teeth.” They’re not the only group that Volkswagen has caused pain. Dealers who bought into Volkswagen’s vision of being a mass-market brand and spent close to a billion dollars, only to see sales fall apart are not very happy. There also seems to be a disconnect between dealers and Volkswagen as this quote from Bloomberg illustrates, “The suggestion was startling: Maybe VW should give up on selling cars to America’s masses. It was late January, at the Detroit auto show, and Herbert Diess, the global chief of Volkswagen AG’s namesake brand, was sounding out U.S. dealers as the company grappled with the biggest crisis in its modern history. Perhaps, Diess wondered aloud, VW should stop trying to compete with the likes of Toyota Motor Corp. in America and go back to focusing on higher-end models. “It was near crickets in the room,” said Alan Brown, chairman of VW’s U.S. dealer council.” Volkswagen is now at a crossroads with seemingly everyone angry with them in one form or another. There are so many things the company could have done to be in a better place than they are currently. But the Volkswagen’s mindset and not fully understanding the U.S. put them in a the place where they are now. Whether or not they learn from this experience and make the necessary changes to survive remains to be seen. The one thing we are sure about is that Volkswagen lost a lot of trust from various groups because of this scandal. As anyone will tell you, regaining trust is a seemingly impossible task. View full article
  8. Over the past six months and numerous articles with the ‘As the Diesel Emits’ in the title, we are no closer to have a fix for the around 600,000 Volkswagen diesel vehicles with illegal emission software. Instead, we have been treated a first-rate performance of ‘How not to handle a crisis’. From Volkswagen’s delay of admitting the illegal software to CEO Matthias Muller seeming very oblivious to what happening in an interview. It seems the German automaker is getting one black eye after another. The past month or so has seen the crisis cranked up to eleven. New documents revealed that senior managers, including former CEO Martin Winterkorn, were alerted about the U.S. probing some of their TDI models back in 2014 This was followed up by a letter from last year alerting Winterkorn that the Volkswagen did use a defeat device in their diesel models - two weeks before the official EPA announcement. A U.S. Federal Judge has given Volkswagen until March 24th to give an answer on where they stand on a possible fix. Volkswagen of America CEO and President Michael Horn suddenly stepped down from his position. With Horn’s departure, dealers want answers as to what happens next or a mutiny could happen. Ever since this scandal came to light, there has been a question that has been floating around in my head: Does Volkswagen know how much trouble it is in? On the surface, it seems they do and are trying their best to rectify this issue. But dig a little bit further and there are very troubling signs. For example, the Associate Press last week learned from a couple people that Volkswagen’s management in Germany resisted the plan set by Horn to offer $1,000 in gift cards to owners as a gesture of goodwill. Thankfully management relented and the program was instituted. Then there was Volkswagen’s first proposal to fix the affected vehicles in the U.S. which got rejected by the California Air Resources Board as it was “incomplete, substantially deficient and fall far short of meeting the legal requirements to return these vehicles” to compliance. Since then, Volkswagen has been working on a new solution to present to CARB and the EPA, though we haven’t heard anything about it. These concerns bring up another question about Volkswagen: Do they know what their place in America is? Last September, Automobile Magazine ran an excellent editorial titled Volkswagen Has Never Understood its Place in the U.S. In the piece, the author argues that Volkswagen is seen by many Americans as something out of the mainstream - original Beetle, Microbus, Golf GTI, and their diesel lineup. Because of this, Volkswagen has a small, but loyal fanbase, But Volkswagen sees themselves as something different; a mass-market brand capable of selling many vehicles around. Except in the U.S. A few years ago, Volkswagen set an ambitious goal of selling 800,000 vehicles in the U.S. by 2018. To achieve this goal, the automaker decided to build vehicles tailored to the marketplace. What we ended up with was a Passat and Jetta that were appealing as stale bread because that is what the company thought would sell. At first, the strategy worked as sales of Volkswagen vehicles increased. But in the past couple of years, sales have dropped precipitously. The company has been scratching their heads as to why this is happening. It goes back to Volkswagen not understanding their place in the U.S. That last sentence can be extended further into the diesel emission crisis. The way Volkswagen has handled this crisis is nothing short of disastrous. If you are a company dealing with a massive crisis, the key thing you should be doing is keeping everyone somewhat abreast of what is happening. Volkswagen has barely done this and has given the impression that they are really not doing anything, despite all of the reports saying Volkswagen is conducting an internal investigation and working on a fix. This one quote from the Automobile Magazine editorial partly sums the predicament Volkswagen finds itself in. “That left the small clique of devoted enthusiasts, folks who bought Volkswagens because they were Volkswagens, and often because they were Volkswagen “clean” diesels. These are precisely the people Volkswagen just kicked in the teeth.” They’re not the only group that Volkswagen has caused pain. Dealers who bought into Volkswagen’s vision of being a mass-market brand and spent close to a billion dollars, only to see sales fall apart are not very happy. There also seems to be a disconnect between dealers and Volkswagen as this quote from Bloomberg illustrates, “The suggestion was startling: Maybe VW should give up on selling cars to America’s masses. It was late January, at the Detroit auto show, and Herbert Diess, the global chief of Volkswagen AG’s namesake brand, was sounding out U.S. dealers as the company grappled with the biggest crisis in its modern history. Perhaps, Diess wondered aloud, VW should stop trying to compete with the likes of Toyota Motor Corp. in America and go back to focusing on higher-end models. “It was near crickets in the room,” said Alan Brown, chairman of VW’s U.S. dealer council.” Volkswagen is now at a crossroads with seemingly everyone angry with them in one form or another. There are so many things the company could have done to be in a better place than they are currently. But the Volkswagen’s mindset and not fully understanding the U.S. put them in a the place where they are now. Whether or not they learn from this experience and make the necessary changes to survive remains to be seen. The one thing we are sure about is that Volkswagen lost a lot of trust from various groups because of this scandal. As anyone will tell you, regaining trust is a seemingly impossible task.
  9. A new wrinkle has appeared in the Volkswagen diesel scandal. Last week, Daniel Donovan filed suit against Volkswagen of America for wrongful termination and breaking the Michigan Whistleblowers' Protection Act after reporting that the company continuing deleting data after the EPA said to stop. On September 18, the EPA filed a violation notice against Volkswagen's diesel vehicles. Part of that notice required Volkswagen to not delete any more data. Donovan alleges in the suit that workers at Volkswagen Group of America's data processing center in Auburn Hills, MI did not stop till September 21st. Donovan told his supervisor about this and tried to stop the deletions. A couple of months later, Donovan was fired. Donovan claims his firing was due to concerns Volkswagen of him reporting this to authorities. "The circumstances of Mr. Donovan's departure were unrelated to the diesel emissions issue. We believe his claim of wrongful termination is without merit," said Volkswagen in a statement to Autoblog. Unfortunately, we don't know what kind of data was deleted. But if these allegations are proven to be true, it doesn't matter what kind of data it was: Volkswagen violated the order and could be facing punishment for it. Source: Courthouse News Service, Sueddeutsche Zeitung, Reuters, Autoblog View full article
  10. A new wrinkle has appeared in the Volkswagen diesel scandal. Last week, Daniel Donovan filed suit against Volkswagen of America for wrongful termination and breaking the Michigan Whistleblowers' Protection Act after reporting that the company continuing deleting data after the EPA said to stop. On September 18, the EPA filed a violation notice against Volkswagen's diesel vehicles. Part of that notice required Volkswagen to not delete any more data. Donovan alleges in the suit that workers at Volkswagen Group of America's data processing center in Auburn Hills, MI did not stop till September 21st. Donovan told his supervisor about this and tried to stop the deletions. A couple of months later, Donovan was fired. Donovan claims his firing was due to concerns Volkswagen of him reporting this to authorities. "The circumstances of Mr. Donovan's departure were unrelated to the diesel emissions issue. We believe his claim of wrongful termination is without merit," said Volkswagen in a statement to Autoblog. Unfortunately, we don't know what kind of data was deleted. But if these allegations are proven to be true, it doesn't matter what kind of data it was: Volkswagen violated the order and could be facing punishment for it. Source: Courthouse News Service, Sueddeutsche Zeitung, Reuters, Autoblog
  11. The big stumbling block for Volkswagen and the EPA/California Air Resources Board (CARB) has been trying to figure out a fix for diesel vehicles with illegal software. Ever since CARB rejected Volkswagen's first proposal back in January, the three have been in negotiations. But now, an official from CARB says some vehicles may only get a partial fix. Speaking at a legislative hearing in California yesterday, chief of the California Air Resources Board enforcement division Todd Sax said it might not be possible for Volkswagen to provide a compliant fix for all of the affected models. "Our goal has been to fix the vehicles and return them to their certified configuration as expeditiously as possible. Unfortunately, this may not be possible," said Sax. He believes there isn't a fix that could comply with either emission standards or onboard diagnostic requirements. "We will have to decide what the best approach is to dealing with these vehicles, and one of the options potentially would be to accept something less than a full fix," explained Sax. Newer TDI models use AdBlue diesel exhaust fluid to clean up emission and it is expected a software update will bring them into compliance. Older TDI models feature lean NOx traps (LNTs) to clean up emissions. These models need extensive modifications to bring them into compliance which could cost Volkswagen a lot of money. Sax was quick to point out that a compromise hasn't been agreed on and all of the parties are still in discussions. But if this option was taken, Volkswagen would need to pay penalties to mitigate the harm caused by leaving these vehicles on the road. Source: Reuters
  12. The big stumbling block for Volkswagen and the EPA/California Air Resources Board (CARB) has been trying to figure out a fix for diesel vehicles with illegal software. Ever since CARB rejected Volkswagen's first proposal back in January, the three have been in negotiations. But now, an official from CARB says some vehicles may only get a partial fix. Speaking at a legislative hearing in California yesterday, chief of the California Air Resources Board enforcement division Todd Sax said it might not be possible for Volkswagen to provide a compliant fix for all of the affected models. "Our goal has been to fix the vehicles and return them to their certified configuration as expeditiously as possible. Unfortunately, this may not be possible," said Sax. He believes there isn't a fix that could comply with either emission standards or onboard diagnostic requirements. "We will have to decide what the best approach is to dealing with these vehicles, and one of the options potentially would be to accept something less than a full fix," explained Sax. Newer TDI models use AdBlue diesel exhaust fluid to clean up emission and it is expected a software update will bring them into compliance. Older TDI models feature lean NOx traps (LNTs) to clean up emissions. These models need extensive modifications to bring them into compliance which could cost Volkswagen a lot of money. Sax was quick to point out that a compromise hasn't been agreed on and all of the parties are still in discussions. But if this option was taken, Volkswagen would need to pay penalties to mitigate the harm caused by leaving these vehicles on the road. Source: Reuters View full article
  13. We're getting close to entering the seventh month of not having a fix for Volkswagen's cheating TDI engines in the U.S. A couple weeks back, a Federal judge in California gave Volkswagen a deadline of March 24th to provide a definitive status of a fix. But Volkswagen might not have the answer the judge or affected owners want. In an interview with German newspaper Wolfsburger Allgemeine Zeitung, Volkswagen brand boss Herbert Deiss said it could take months before Volkswagen and U.S. authorities come to an agreement. "I think that we have a good chance to reach an agreement with the authorities in the US in the coming months," said Deiss. There are a couple possible reasons for Deiss' response. First is that Volkswagen still doesn't have another solution ready. As we reported back in January, Volkswagen's first proposal was rejected by CARB due to it being "incomplete, substantially deficient and fall far short of meeting the legal requirements to return these vehicles” to compliance. Volkswagen has been hard at work on a new proposal since then. There has been talk this new proposal will include a buyback program. The second reason comes down to money. Volkswagen knows that it will be facing large fines from various regulators, along with the massive costs in terms of fixing vehicles and dealing with lawsuits. Source: Wolfsburger Allgemeine Zeitung, Reuters View full article
  14. We're getting close to entering the seventh month of not having a fix for Volkswagen's cheating TDI engines in the U.S. A couple weeks back, a Federal judge in California gave Volkswagen a deadline of March 24th to provide a definitive status of a fix. But Volkswagen might not have the answer the judge or affected owners want. In an interview with German newspaper Wolfsburger Allgemeine Zeitung, Volkswagen brand boss Herbert Deiss said it could take months before Volkswagen and U.S. authorities come to an agreement. "I think that we have a good chance to reach an agreement with the authorities in the US in the coming months," said Deiss. There are a couple possible reasons for Deiss' response. First is that Volkswagen still doesn't have another solution ready. As we reported back in January, Volkswagen's first proposal was rejected by CARB due to it being "incomplete, substantially deficient and fall far short of meeting the legal requirements to return these vehicles” to compliance. Volkswagen has been hard at work on a new proposal since then. There has been talk this new proposal will include a buyback program. The second reason comes down to money. Volkswagen knows that it will be facing large fines from various regulators, along with the massive costs in terms of fixing vehicles and dealing with lawsuits. Source: Wolfsburger Allgemeine Zeitung, Reuters
  15. A new report alleges that former Volkswagen CEO, Martin Winterkorn knew about the defeat devices two weeks before the official announcement from U.S. regulators. German publication Bild am Sonntag (via Reuters) got their hands on a letter sent on September 4, 2015, to Winterkorn from a manager. The letter said, "In the conversation on 03.09.2015 with the regulator CARB (California Air Resources Board), the defeat device was admitted." Volkswagen's U.S. CEO Michael Horn told a House of Representatives hearing in October that the company came clean about the defeat device on September 3rd. Now this letter could have some serious ramifications for Volkswagen. Shareholders who are planning to sue the German automaker for compensation for the plunge in its share price could use the letter in court, saying the company should have revealed to the public about the defeat devices when they admitted to it. Volkswagen declined to comment on the report. Source: Bild via Reuters View full article
  16. A new report alleges that former Volkswagen CEO, Martin Winterkorn knew about the defeat devices two weeks before the official announcement from U.S. regulators. German publication Bild am Sonntag (via Reuters) got their hands on a letter sent on September 4, 2015, to Winterkorn from a manager. The letter said, "In the conversation on 03.09.2015 with the regulator CARB (California Air Resources Board), the defeat device was admitted." Volkswagen's U.S. CEO Michael Horn told a House of Representatives hearing in October that the company came clean about the defeat device on September 3rd. Now this letter could have some serious ramifications for Volkswagen. Shareholders who are planning to sue the German automaker for compensation for the plunge in its share price could use the letter in court, saying the company should have revealed to the public about the defeat devices when they admitted to it. Volkswagen declined to comment on the report. Source: Bild via Reuters
  17. It has been almost six months since Volkswagen admitted to using illegal software on their diesel vehicles to fool emission tests. Since then, a lot of people have been waiting for a fix to make the vehicles legal. Now a federal judge has given Volkswagen a deadline to come up with a solution. Reuters reports that at hearing yesterday, U.S. District Judge Charles Breyer in San Francisco has given the German automaker till March 24th to give a definitive answer on the status of a fix. "Six months is long enough" to determine if this is a fixable problem, Breyer said. "This is an ongoing problem." Back in January, Volkswagen presented a possible solution to the EPA and California Air Resources Board (CARB). But CARB rejected the plan as it was "incomplete, substantially deficient and fall far short of meeting the legal requirements to return these vehicles” to compliance. Since then, Volkswagen has been talking with the EPA, CARB, and the U.S. Justice Department about a new solution. Robert Giuffra, a lawyer representing Volkswagen told the Judge Breyer the company is making progress with the various parties. Giuffra couldn't go into specifics as the Justice Department has asked Volkswagen not to speak about the negoations. "We are committed to resolving these matters as quickly as possible," said Giuffra. Source: Reuters
  18. It has been almost six months since Volkswagen admitted to using illegal software on their diesel vehicles to fool emission tests. Since then, a lot of people have been waiting for a fix to make the vehicles legal. Now a federal judge has given Volkswagen a deadline to come up with a solution. Reuters reports that at hearing yesterday, U.S. District Judge Charles Breyer in San Francisco has given the German automaker till March 24th to give a definitive answer on the status of a fix. "Six months is long enough" to determine if this is a fixable problem, Breyer said. "This is an ongoing problem." Back in January, Volkswagen presented a possible solution to the EPA and California Air Resources Board (CARB). But CARB rejected the plan as it was "incomplete, substantially deficient and fall far short of meeting the legal requirements to return these vehicles” to compliance. Since then, Volkswagen has been talking with the EPA, CARB, and the U.S. Justice Department about a new solution. Robert Giuffra, a lawyer representing Volkswagen told the Judge Breyer the company is making progress with the various parties. Giuffra couldn't go into specifics as the Justice Department has asked Volkswagen not to speak about the negoations. "We are committed to resolving these matters as quickly as possible," said Giuffra. Source: Reuters View full article
  19. A possible punishment that the EPA could bring down on Volkswagen is making them build electric vehicles in the U.S. German newspaper Welt am Sonntag reports the EPA is asking the German automaker to produce EVs at their Chattanooga, TN plant and to help build out a network of chargers across the U.S. The report doesn't say if EPA is asking for VW to produce a new electric vehicle or a current one - the Golf EV. It should be noted that Welt am Sonntag's report doesn't cite a source. "Talks with the EPA are ongoing and we are not commenting on the contents and state of the negotiations," said a Volkswagen spokesperson to Reuters. The EPA declined to comment. Reuters also notes Hans Dieter Poetsch, Volkswagen's chairman of Volkswagen's supervisory board German transport minister Alexander Dobrindt last week to give an update on cleaning up this mess. First reported by the German publication Bild am Sonntag, Poetsch said the company would do everything in its power to solve this crisis. Source: Welt am Sonntag, Reuters, Bild am Sonntag View full article
  20. A possible punishment that the EPA could bring down on Volkswagen is making them build electric vehicles in the U.S. German newspaper Welt am Sonntag reports the EPA is asking the German automaker to produce EVs at their Chattanooga, TN plant and to help build out a network of chargers across the U.S. The report doesn't say if EPA is asking for VW to produce a new electric vehicle or a current one - the Golf EV. It should be noted that Welt am Sonntag's report doesn't cite a source. "Talks with the EPA are ongoing and we are not commenting on the contents and state of the negotiations," said a Volkswagen spokesperson to Reuters. The EPA declined to comment. Reuters also notes Hans Dieter Poetsch, Volkswagen's chairman of Volkswagen's supervisory board German transport minister Alexander Dobrindt last week to give an update on cleaning up this mess. First reported by the German publication Bild am Sonntag, Poetsch said the company would do everything in its power to solve this crisis. Source: Welt am Sonntag, Reuters, Bild am Sonntag
  21. Last month, the California Air Resources Board (CARB) rejected Volkswagen's plan to fix the 2.0L TDI because it was "incomplete, substantially deficient and fall far short of meeting the legal requirements to return these vehicles” to compliance. With this setback, many are concerned that it will be awhile before a fix is agreed on by Volkswagen and CARB/EPA. German magazine Manager Magazin reports that top managers at the German automaker believe an agreement between the three parties might not happen until the end of March. The reason comes down to the EPA wanting to do a long-distance test of Volkswagen's proposed fix to make sure it actually fixes the problem of elevated emission levels. The report also mentions that expected costs of doing the recall, possible buybacks, and customer compensation will be significantly higher than first thought. Source: Manager Magazin View full article
  22. Last month, the California Air Resources Board (CARB) rejected Volkswagen's plan to fix the 2.0L TDI because it was "incomplete, substantially deficient and fall far short of meeting the legal requirements to return these vehicles” to compliance. With this setback, many are concerned that it will be awhile before a fix is agreed on by Volkswagen and CARB/EPA. German magazine Manager Magazin reports that top managers at the German automaker believe an agreement between the three parties might not happen until the end of March. The reason comes down to the EPA wanting to do a long-distance test of Volkswagen's proposed fix to make sure it actually fixes the problem of elevated emission levels. The report also mentions that expected costs of doing the recall, possible buybacks, and customer compensation will be significantly higher than first thought. Source: Manager Magazin
  23. Volkswagen has said time and time again they didn't know about the emission cheating until sometime in 2015. But a new report calls this into question. German newspaper Bild am Sonntag (via Reuters) reported over the weekend that an employee known internally as "Winterkorn's fireman" notified senior managers - including Volkswagen's CEO at the time Martin Winterkorn - about the U.S. possibly probing some of VW's diesel vehicles for high emission levels back in May of 2014. The letter came from Volkswagen's product quality and safety department. "It can be assumed that the authorities will investigate VW systems to establish whether Volkswagen has implemented test-recognition software," the letter states. The letter was uncovered by Jones Day, the law firm conducting the Volkswagen's internal investigation. Two sources tell Reuters that they knew about the letter, but couldn't say if Winterkorn saw the letter or not. A Volkswagen spokesman declined to comment. Source: Bild via Reuters View full article
  24. Volkswagen has said time and time again they didn't know about the emission cheating until sometime in 2015. But a new report calls this into question. German newspaper Bild am Sonntag (via Reuters) reported over the weekend that an employee known internally as "Winterkorn's fireman" notified senior managers - including Volkswagen's CEO at the time Martin Winterkorn - about the U.S. possibly probing some of VW's diesel vehicles for high emission levels back in May of 2014. The letter came from Volkswagen's product quality and safety department. "It can be assumed that the authorities will investigate VW systems to establish whether Volkswagen has implemented test-recognition software," the letter states. The letter was uncovered by Jones Day, the law firm conducting the Volkswagen's internal investigation. Two sources tell Reuters that they knew about the letter, but couldn't say if Winterkorn saw the letter or not. A Volkswagen spokesman declined to comment. Source: Bild via Reuters
  25. Kenneth Feinberg is still hard at work on developing a compensation plan for TDI owners in the U.S. affected by the diesel emission scandal. But in an interview with German newspaper Frankfurter Allgemeine Sonntagszeitung, Feinberg says "there will be a generous solution." Now what that solution will end up being is unknown at this time. Part of the problem is Feinberg has his hands tied as Volkswagen and the EPA/CARB are still working on trying to figure out a fix for the 2.0L TDI engine. "..my hands are tied, while VW and the authorities do not resolve their differences. The original time frame could be delayed, therefore." The other problem is trying to figure out what an appropriate compensation will look like. “The jury is still out, and at the moment all options are up for debate: cash payments, buybacks, repairs, replacements with new cars,” said Feinberg. Not helping matters are the different generations of the engine in question - the EA189. One generation of the engine might have a different program than the other. Feinberg believes that once the compensation program comes online, most owners will take advantage of it. "When funds for the victims of September 11, 97 percent of claimants have accepted my offer. If GM and BP were also more than 90 percent. This must also be the target for VW." Source: Frankfurter Allgemeine Sonntagszeitung, Reuters View full article

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