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  1. The Toyota Land Cruiser and Lexus LX 570 are part of an endangered species: SUVs designed with the purpose of going off-road. It may seem somewhat mad to describe most SUVs as not off-road oriented, but most buyers don’t really take SUVs off the beaten path. Automakers have responded in kind by providing a minimum four-wheel capability while improving on-road behavior. The Land Cruiser and LX 570 haven’t gone down this path as they have a small, but loyal owner base that would cry foul if Toyota/Lexus decided to do this. But as I found out during my week with them, Toyota and Lexus need to do some serious thinking about the future of these models if they want to keep them around. Exterior Both the Land Cruiser and LX 570 share the same boxy shape with a slightly angled front end, large area of glass, and a split opening tailgate. Where the two differentiate is in the details. Toyota plays it safe with a large rectangular grille and chrome bars that separate the front headlights. The set of 18-inch alloy wheels look somewhat small on the Land Cruiser, mostly due to the large size of the off-road tires. The LX 570 is very extroverted as evidenced by the front end styling. It features the largest version of Lexus’ spindle grille that gives it an intense look. A set of LED headlights with a unique lamp design sit on either side. Multi-spoke 20-inch wheels are standard and seem suited to fit the large size of the SUV. Interior Considering the $84k+ price tag of this Land Cruiser, it is slightly disappointing that Toyota went for a very utilitarian look. It doesn’t have the flash or elegance and you’ll find in competitors such as the Range Rover or Mercedes-Benz GLS. Material quality is what you expect for the price with an abundance of soft-touch plastic, leather upholstery, wood trim, and faux metal used all around. The Lexus LX 570 takes a different approach with the interior, feeling more like a real contender to the likes of the Germans and Range Rover. The dash design is very modern with a short center stack, a widescreen display for the infotainment system, and glossy wood trim. Both models have a button-ladened center stack, but I found the LX 570’s easier to use as the buttons weren’t tightly packed. Getting inside either SUV is somewhat tough due to the tall ride height. But thanks to doorsteps and pull handles, entering both models becomes easier. The front seats are some of best I have sat in, offering plenty of cushioning and support for any trip length. Power adjustments and memory come standard on both models. The second-row offers plenty of head and legroom for passengers. You can slide the seat to either increase legroom or cargo space. The third-row should only be used for small kids as there is only a minuscule amount of legroom. The lack of padding also makes third-row best for short trips. One quirk about the Land Cruiser and LX 570’s third-row is that the seats don’t fold into the floor. Instead, the seats flip towards the side. Not only does it make it slightly awkward to load cargo into either model, but it also makes for a small cargo area. Measurements for the two models are 16.1 cubic feet with all three-rows up, 44.7 with the third-row folded, and 81.7 with the second-row folded. For 2018, Lexus did introduce a two-row version that increases space by 5.8 cubic feet - bringing the total to 50.5 cubic feet. Infotainment Lexus has fitted one the of largest infotainment screens in the class into the LX 570. Measuring 12.3-inches, this allows for a split-screen capability where you can have various functions up at the same time. For example, you can have navigation on one side and audio on the other. Some of the configuration options Lexus offers are strange to say in the least like having two maps of the navigation system up at the same time. Where the LX 570 falls short is the Remote Touch controller. The joystick controller is a pain to use as it feels quite vague when moving around and causes you to overshoot when trying to select something. This is very problematic when you’re driving as you’ll find yourself paying more attention to the system than the road. In the Land Cruiser, you’ll find a smaller 9-inch infotainment system with Toyota’s Entune system. Thankfully, Toyota had decided to use a touchscreen instead of a frustrating controller. Moving around in Entune is easy thanks to a simple interface with large touchscreen buttons and a set of physical shortcut buttons underneath. I did notice that Entune was a few ticks slower than the system found in the LX 570. Apple CarPlay or Android Auto is not available on either model. Powertrain Under the hoods of the Land Cruiser and LX 570 is a 5.7L V8. The Land Cruiser gets 381 horsepower and 401 pound-feet of torque. The LX 570 features 383 horsepower and 403 pound-feet of torque. This is teamed with an eight-speed automatic and a full-time four-wheel drive system. Interestingly, the Land Cruiser feels slightly faster than the LX 570. Outlets who have timed both models say the Land Cruiser is about 0.5 seconds quicker to 60 than the LX 570. This is a bit surprising considering the two models are nearly identical in power and weight. But the LX 570 has a noticeable pause when accelerating. It feels like the engine was asleep and was startled by the throttle being prodded, before realizing it needed to get to work. The eight-speed automatic delivers rapid and smooth upshifts, but stumbles somewhat when it comes to downshifts. Both models come fully-equipped to take on whatever Mother Nature decides to dish out. This includes a two-speed transfer case, locking center differential, crawl-control system, terrain selection system, and an adjustable suspension system. Sadly, I didn’t get the chance to take either model off the paved road to see what they are capable of. Fuel Economy EPA rates the 2018 Land Cruiser and LX 570 at 13 City/18 Highway/15 Combined. My average in both vehicles landed around 14.9 mpg in a 50/50 mix of city and highway driving. Ride and Handling These SUVs prefer the roads to be straight as there is significant body motion when cornering. Blame the tall ride height and soft-suspension tuning. Steering feels very numb and slow, making it somewhat tough to figure out how much input is needed when turning. When the road is straight, both vehicles provide a smooth ride. I did find that on the highway, I needed to make constant corrections with the steering to keep it in the middle of the lane. One major difference between the two is braking. The LX 570’s braking system felt very discombobulated. It was very difficult to modulate the pedal to provide a smooth stop. Either the vehicle wasn’t slowing down or the braking system would enter panic stop mode and passengers being thrown from their seats. I thought this was an issue that was limited to my LX, but other people who have driven different LXs have reported similar behavior. The Land Cruiser didn’t experience any of this during my week. Value The 2018 Toyota Land Cruiser begins at $83,665, while the LX 570 begins at $85,630 for the two-row variant and $89,980 for the three-row model. Both models come generously equipped with a number of standard features such as adaptive cruise control, blind spot monitoring, heated and ventilated front seats; power tilt-telescoping steering wheel, and three-zone climate control. The vehicles tested here came lightly optioned. The Land Cruiser featured a set of optional floor mats, bringing the as-tested price to $85,185. For the LX 570, it came with a rear-seat DVD entertainment system and center console cool box to bring its as-tested price to $93,350. The best value of the two models has to be the two-row LX 570 as you get a nicer interior and more cargo space, for not much more money than the three-row Land Cruiser. But if you really want three-rows, then the Land Cruiser is your best bet. Verdict Unless your daily commute includes traversing the Rocky Mountains or driving through Death Valley, I cannot recommend either of these SUVs. They have a number of flaws such as middling fuel economy, small cargo area, and needing constant steering corrections on the highway. But the LX 570 comes off slightly worse as it has some issues with the powertrain and brakes need to be addressed quickly. Besides, the Land Cruiser offers many of the features of LX 570, albeit in a more utilitarian package for a couple of grand less. But for some people, the off-road capability and legendary reliability of these two models are more than enough to excuse the faults. That group of people though we have to think is getting smaller as time goes on and makes us wonder if the next-generation of the Land Cruiser and LX 570 will go through a dramatic change or not. Disclaimer: Toyota Provided the Vehicles, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas Year: 2018 Make: Lexus Model: LX 570 Trim: N/A Engine: 5.7L 32-Valve, DOHC, Dual VVT-i V8 Driveline: Eight-Speed Automatic, Four-Wheel Drive Horsepower @ RPM: 383 @ 5,600 Torque @ RPM: 403 @ 3,600 Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 13/18/15 Curb Weight: 5,815 lbs Location of Manufacture: Toyota, Aichi Prefecture, Japan Base Price: $89,980 As Tested Price: $93,350 (Includes $1,195.00 Destination Charge) Options: Dual-Screen DVD Rear-Entertainment System - $2,005.00 Cool Box - $170.00 Year: 2018 Make: Toyota Model: Land Cruiser Trim: N/A Engine: 5.7L 32-Valve, DOHC, Dual VVT-i V8 Driveline: Eight-Speed Automatic, Four-Wheel Drive Horsepower @ RPM: 381@ 5,600 Torque @ RPM: 401 @ 3,600 Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 13/18/15 Curb Weight: 5,815 lbs Location of Manufacture: Toyota, Aichi Prefecture, Japan Base Price: $83,685 As Tested Price: $85,185 (Includes $1,295.00 Destination Charge) Options: Carpet Floor/Cargo Mat Set - $225.00 View full article
  2. The Toyota Land Cruiser and Lexus LX 570 are part of an endangered species: SUVs designed with the purpose of going off-road. It may seem somewhat mad to describe most SUVs as not off-road oriented, but most buyers don’t really take SUVs off the beaten path. Automakers have responded in kind by providing a minimum four-wheel capability while improving on-road behavior. The Land Cruiser and LX 570 haven’t gone down this path as they have a small, but loyal owner base that would cry foul if Toyota/Lexus decided to do this. But as I found out during my week with them, Toyota and Lexus need to do some serious thinking about the future of these models if they want to keep them around. Exterior Both the Land Cruiser and LX 570 share the same boxy shape with a slightly angled front end, large area of glass, and a split opening tailgate. Where the two differentiate is in the details. Toyota plays it safe with a large rectangular grille and chrome bars that separate the front headlights. The set of 18-inch alloy wheels look somewhat small on the Land Cruiser, mostly due to the large size of the off-road tires. The LX 570 is very extroverted as evidenced by the front end styling. It features the largest version of Lexus’ spindle grille that gives it an intense look. A set of LED headlights with a unique lamp design sit on either side. Multi-spoke 20-inch wheels are standard and seem suited to fit the large size of the SUV. Interior Considering the $84k+ price tag of this Land Cruiser, it is slightly disappointing that Toyota went for a very utilitarian look. It doesn’t have the flash or elegance and you’ll find in competitors such as the Range Rover or Mercedes-Benz GLS. Material quality is what you expect for the price with an abundance of soft-touch plastic, leather upholstery, wood trim, and faux metal used all around. The Lexus LX 570 takes a different approach with the interior, feeling more like a real contender to the likes of the Germans and Range Rover. The dash design is very modern with a short center stack, a widescreen display for the infotainment system, and glossy wood trim. Both models have a button-ladened center stack, but I found the LX 570’s easier to use as the buttons weren’t tightly packed. Getting inside either SUV is somewhat tough due to the tall ride height. But thanks to doorsteps and pull handles, entering both models becomes easier. The front seats are some of best I have sat in, offering plenty of cushioning and support for any trip length. Power adjustments and memory come standard on both models. The second-row offers plenty of head and legroom for passengers. You can slide the seat to either increase legroom or cargo space. The third-row should only be used for small kids as there is only a minuscule amount of legroom. The lack of padding also makes third-row best for short trips. One quirk about the Land Cruiser and LX 570’s third-row is that the seats don’t fold into the floor. Instead, the seats flip towards the side. Not only does it make it slightly awkward to load cargo into either model, but it also makes for a small cargo area. Measurements for the two models are 16.1 cubic feet with all three-rows up, 44.7 with the third-row folded, and 81.7 with the second-row folded. For 2018, Lexus did introduce a two-row version that increases space by 5.8 cubic feet - bringing the total to 50.5 cubic feet. Infotainment Lexus has fitted one the of largest infotainment screens in the class into the LX 570. Measuring 12.3-inches, this allows for a split-screen capability where you can have various functions up at the same time. For example, you can have navigation on one side and audio on the other. Some of the configuration options Lexus offers are strange to say in the least like having two maps of the navigation system up at the same time. Where the LX 570 falls short is the Remote Touch controller. The joystick controller is a pain to use as it feels quite vague when moving around and causes you to overshoot when trying to select something. This is very problematic when you’re driving as you’ll find yourself paying more attention to the system than the road. In the Land Cruiser, you’ll find a smaller 9-inch infotainment system with Toyota’s Entune system. Thankfully, Toyota had decided to use a touchscreen instead of a frustrating controller. Moving around in Entune is easy thanks to a simple interface with large touchscreen buttons and a set of physical shortcut buttons underneath. I did notice that Entune was a few ticks slower than the system found in the LX 570. Apple CarPlay or Android Auto is not available on either model. Powertrain Under the hoods of the Land Cruiser and LX 570 is a 5.7L V8. The Land Cruiser gets 381 horsepower and 401 pound-feet of torque. The LX 570 features 383 horsepower and 403 pound-feet of torque. This is teamed with an eight-speed automatic and a full-time four-wheel drive system. Interestingly, the Land Cruiser feels slightly faster than the LX 570. Outlets who have timed both models say the Land Cruiser is about 0.5 seconds quicker to 60 than the LX 570. This is a bit surprising considering the two models are nearly identical in power and weight. But the LX 570 has a noticeable pause when accelerating. It feels like the engine was asleep and was startled by the throttle being prodded, before realizing it needed to get to work. The eight-speed automatic delivers rapid and smooth upshifts, but stumbles somewhat when it comes to downshifts. Both models come fully-equipped to take on whatever Mother Nature decides to dish out. This includes a two-speed transfer case, locking center differential, crawl-control system, terrain selection system, and an adjustable suspension system. Sadly, I didn’t get the chance to take either model off the paved road to see what they are capable of. Fuel Economy EPA rates the 2018 Land Cruiser and LX 570 at 13 City/18 Highway/15 Combined. My average in both vehicles landed around 14.9 mpg in a 50/50 mix of city and highway driving. Ride and Handling These SUVs prefer the roads to be straight as there is significant body motion when cornering. Blame the tall ride height and soft-suspension tuning. Steering feels very numb and slow, making it somewhat tough to figure out how much input is needed when turning. When the road is straight, both vehicles provide a smooth ride. I did find that on the highway, I needed to make constant corrections with the steering to keep it in the middle of the lane. One major difference between the two is braking. The LX 570’s braking system felt very discombobulated. It was very difficult to modulate the pedal to provide a smooth stop. Either the vehicle wasn’t slowing down or the braking system would enter panic stop mode and passengers being thrown from their seats. I thought this was an issue that was limited to my LX, but other people who have driven different LXs have reported similar behavior. The Land Cruiser didn’t experience any of this during my week. Value The 2018 Toyota Land Cruiser begins at $83,665, while the LX 570 begins at $85,630 for the two-row variant and $89,980 for the three-row model. Both models come generously equipped with a number of standard features such as adaptive cruise control, blind spot monitoring, heated and ventilated front seats; power tilt-telescoping steering wheel, and three-zone climate control. The vehicles tested here came lightly optioned. The Land Cruiser featured a set of optional floor mats, bringing the as-tested price to $85,185. For the LX 570, it came with a rear-seat DVD entertainment system and center console cool box to bring its as-tested price to $93,350. The best value of the two models has to be the two-row LX 570 as you get a nicer interior and more cargo space, for not much more money than the three-row Land Cruiser. But if you really want three-rows, then the Land Cruiser is your best bet. Verdict Unless your daily commute includes traversing the Rocky Mountains or driving through Death Valley, I cannot recommend either of these SUVs. They have a number of flaws such as middling fuel economy, small cargo area, and needing constant steering corrections on the highway. But the LX 570 comes off slightly worse as it has some issues with the powertrain and brakes need to be addressed quickly. Besides, the Land Cruiser offers many of the features of LX 570, albeit in a more utilitarian package for a couple of grand less. But for some people, the off-road capability and legendary reliability of these two models are more than enough to excuse the faults. That group of people though we have to think is getting smaller as time goes on and makes us wonder if the next-generation of the Land Cruiser and LX 570 will go through a dramatic change or not. Disclaimer: Toyota Provided the Vehicles, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas Year: 2018 Make: Lexus Model: LX 570 Trim: N/A Engine: 5.7L 32-Valve, DOHC, Dual VVT-i V8 Driveline: Eight-Speed Automatic, Four-Wheel Drive Horsepower @ RPM: 383 @ 5,600 Torque @ RPM: 403 @ 3,600 Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 13/18/15 Curb Weight: 5,815 lbs Location of Manufacture: Toyota, Aichi Prefecture, Japan Base Price: $89,980 As Tested Price: $93,350 (Includes $1,195.00 Destination Charge) Options: Dual-Screen DVD Rear-Entertainment System - $2,005.00 Cool Box - $170.00 Year: 2018 Make: Toyota Model: Land Cruiser Trim: N/A Engine: 5.7L 32-Valve, DOHC, Dual VVT-i V8 Driveline: Eight-Speed Automatic, Four-Wheel Drive Horsepower @ RPM: 381@ 5,600 Torque @ RPM: 401 @ 3,600 Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 13/18/15 Curb Weight: 5,815 lbs Location of Manufacture: Toyota, Aichi Prefecture, Japan Base Price: $83,685 As Tested Price: $85,185 (Includes $1,295.00 Destination Charge) Options: Carpet Floor/Cargo Mat Set - $225.00
  3. Most luxury SUVs will never go fully off-road. The closest they’ll ever get is driving down a gravel road. But that doesn’t mean some automakers aren’t filling them with the latest off-road for that one person who decides to. Case in point is the LX 570. Lexus’ variant of the Toyota Land Cruiser has been updated inside and out to try and draw buyers away from the usual suspects in the class. For 2016, Lexus has softened the LX’s boxy-shape with some rounded edges and more imposing fenders. The front grille has grown in size to match other Lexus vehicles, though to our eyes it looks more like the head from a Cylon in the 1980’s Battlestar Galactica tv show. The rear features new taillights and a reshaped tailgate. The interior has somehow become more opulent since the last LX we drove. A new dash design features real wood trim and more soft-touch materials. Our tester featured leather upholstery that can be described as red-orange. At first, I thought it was a bit much. But over the week I grew to like the color as it adds some personality. Sitting in either the front or second-row seats of the LX is a pleasant experience. There is plenty of head and legroom for both rows, along with heat. Front seats also get ventilation as standard. The third-row seat is a bit of joke. Getting back there in the first place is quite difficult due to the small gap when you move the second-row forward. Once back there, you find legroom is almost negligible. Finally, the way the third row folds up by side walls and not into the floor hampers cargo space - only offering 41 cubic feet. Lexus’ Remote Touch interface has arrived in the LX this year with a gargantuan 12.3-inch screen sitting on top of the dash. On the plus side, the screen is vibrant and easy to read. The negative is the remote touch controller as you’ll find yourself choosing the wrong function because the controller is very sensitive to inputs. Power comes from 5.7L V8 with 383 horsepower and 403 pound-feet of torque. This is paired with an eight-speed automatic and full-time four-wheel drive system. On paper, the V8 should move the LX 570 with no issue. But a curb weight of 6,000 pounds negates this. Performance can be described as ho-hum as it takes a few ticks longer to get up to speed. At least the eight-speed automatic transmission is a smooth operator and quick to respond when you stab the throttle. The LX 570 is chock full of clever off-road tech such as crawl control, hill start assist, 360-degree camera system, and multi-terrain select system that optimizes various parts of the powertrain and four-wheel drive system. Sadly, we didn’t get the chance to put any of these to the test. No matter the condition of the road, the LX 570 provides a smooth and relaxing ride. Impressive when you consider the LX is riding on a set of 21-inch wheels. Road and wind noise are kept to very acceptable levels. Lexus added a set of adaptive dampers for the 2016 LX and you can adjust the firmness via a knob in the center console - Comfort, Sport, and Sport+. The dampers do help reduce body roll in corners, giving you a little bit more confidence. Steering is what you would expect in an SUV, light and numb. This makes the LX a bit cumbersome to move in certain places such as a parking lot. Compared to the last LX 570 we drove, the 2016 model has gone up in price. Base price now stands at $88,880 and our as-tested price comes in at $96,905. This one feels a bit a more worth of price tag that Lexus is asking for, but I still think a Cadillac Escalade or Range Rover are slightly better in terms of value. If you’re planning a trip to Death Valley or the Rocky Mountains and want something that can you there and back, along with providing all of the luxuries, look no further than the LX. Otherwise, there are a number of other luxury SUVs that make more sense if you’re planning to stay on the pavement. Year: 2016 Make: Lexus Model: LX 570 Trim: N/A Engine: 5.7L 32-Valve, DOHC Dual VVT-i V8 Driveline: Eight-Speed Automatic, Full-Time Four-Wheel Drive Horsepower @ RPM: 383 @ 5,600 Torque @ RPM: 403 @ 3,600 Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 13/18/15 Curb Weight: 6,000 lbs Location of Manufacture: Aichi, Japn Base Price: $88,880 As Tested Price: $96,905 (Includes $940.00 Destination Charge) Options: Mark Levinson Audio System - $2,150.00 Dual-Screen DVD Rear-Seat Entertainment System - $2,005.00 Luxury Package - $1,190.00 Heads-Up Display - $900.00 Cargo Mat, Net, Wheel Locks, & Key Glove - $250.00 All-Weather Floor Mats - $165.00 Heated Black Shimamoku Steering Wheel - $150.00 Wireless Charger - $75.00 View full article
  4. Most luxury SUVs will never go fully off-road. The closest they’ll ever get is driving down a gravel road. But that doesn’t mean some automakers aren’t filling them with the latest off-road for that one person who decides to. Case in point is the LX 570. Lexus’ variant of the Toyota Land Cruiser has been updated inside and out to try and draw buyers away from the usual suspects in the class. For 2016, Lexus has softened the LX’s boxy-shape with some rounded edges and more imposing fenders. The front grille has grown in size to match other Lexus vehicles, though to our eyes it looks more like the head from a Cylon in the 1980’s Battlestar Galactica tv show. The rear features new taillights and a reshaped tailgate. The interior has somehow become more opulent since the last LX we drove. A new dash design features real wood trim and more soft-touch materials. Our tester featured leather upholstery that can be described as red-orange. At first, I thought it was a bit much. But over the week I grew to like the color as it adds some personality. Sitting in either the front or second-row seats of the LX is a pleasant experience. There is plenty of head and legroom for both rows, along with heat. Front seats also get ventilation as standard. The third-row seat is a bit of joke. Getting back there in the first place is quite difficult due to the small gap when you move the second-row forward. Once back there, you find legroom is almost negligible. Finally, the way the third row folds up by side walls and not into the floor hampers cargo space - only offering 41 cubic feet. Lexus’ Remote Touch interface has arrived in the LX this year with a gargantuan 12.3-inch screen sitting on top of the dash. On the plus side, the screen is vibrant and easy to read. The negative is the remote touch controller as you’ll find yourself choosing the wrong function because the controller is very sensitive to inputs. Power comes from 5.7L V8 with 383 horsepower and 403 pound-feet of torque. This is paired with an eight-speed automatic and full-time four-wheel drive system. On paper, the V8 should move the LX 570 with no issue. But a curb weight of 6,000 pounds negates this. Performance can be described as ho-hum as it takes a few ticks longer to get up to speed. At least the eight-speed automatic transmission is a smooth operator and quick to respond when you stab the throttle. The LX 570 is chock full of clever off-road tech such as crawl control, hill start assist, 360-degree camera system, and multi-terrain select system that optimizes various parts of the powertrain and four-wheel drive system. Sadly, we didn’t get the chance to put any of these to the test. No matter the condition of the road, the LX 570 provides a smooth and relaxing ride. Impressive when you consider the LX is riding on a set of 21-inch wheels. Road and wind noise are kept to very acceptable levels. Lexus added a set of adaptive dampers for the 2016 LX and you can adjust the firmness via a knob in the center console - Comfort, Sport, and Sport+. The dampers do help reduce body roll in corners, giving you a little bit more confidence. Steering is what you would expect in an SUV, light and numb. This makes the LX a bit cumbersome to move in certain places such as a parking lot. Compared to the last LX 570 we drove, the 2016 model has gone up in price. Base price now stands at $88,880 and our as-tested price comes in at $96,905. This one feels a bit a more worth of price tag that Lexus is asking for, but I still think a Cadillac Escalade or Range Rover are slightly better in terms of value. If you’re planning a trip to Death Valley or the Rocky Mountains and want something that can you there and back, along with providing all of the luxuries, look no further than the LX. Otherwise, there are a number of other luxury SUVs that make more sense if you’re planning to stay on the pavement. Year: 2016 Make: Lexus Model: LX 570 Trim: N/A Engine: 5.7L 32-Valve, DOHC Dual VVT-i V8 Driveline: Eight-Speed Automatic, Full-Time Four-Wheel Drive Horsepower @ RPM: 383 @ 5,600 Torque @ RPM: 403 @ 3,600 Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 13/18/15 Curb Weight: 6,000 lbs Location of Manufacture: Aichi, Japn Base Price: $88,880 As Tested Price: $96,905 (Includes $940.00 Destination Charge) Options: Mark Levinson Audio System - $2,150.00 Dual-Screen DVD Rear-Seat Entertainment System - $2,005.00 Luxury Package - $1,190.00 Heads-Up Display - $900.00 Cargo Mat, Net, Wheel Locks, & Key Glove - $250.00 All-Weather Floor Mats - $165.00 Heated Black Shimamoku Steering Wheel - $150.00 Wireless Charger - $75.00
  5. The full-size luxury SUV marketplace are full of models that will never venture off payment. Such models include the Cadillac Escalade, Lincoln Navigator, and Mercedes-Benz GL that have either basic to somewhat advanced four-wheel drive systems. Then there is the Range Rover which boasts a number of off-road technologies and equipment to get you through some of murkiest conditions on earth. Sure, you never see one tackle an off-road trail unless its featured in a promo video, but it’s nice to know the model can get you through. It makes some wonder if there is a competitor that can match the Range Rover in terms of off-road ability and luxuries. Well Lexus believes they have that competitor in the form of the LX 570. I spent a week in it to see if it can compete. The LX 570 is the sister model to the Toyota Land Cruiser, so a fair number of items are shared between the two. For example, the basic shape of the body are similar. Both models boast similar profiles and key design items such as a large glass area and a split-opening tailgate. At least Lexus’ designers should be credited for trying to make the LX look somewhat different from the Land Cruiser. Such details include flared out fenders boasting 20-inch wheels, and a set of running boards. The front-end gets the brand’s distinctive spindle grille and a set of headlights with LEDs. The addition of the spindle grille seems out of place when compared to the rest of the LX’s design. The interior of the LX 570 further differentiates from the Land Cruiser thanks to a new dashboard layout and some luxury touches. Step inside and you’ll notice the large amount of leather and wood trim used throughout. You’ll also notice a large number of buttons and switches throughout the dash and center console. These control aspects of the four-wheel drive and other systems to get you through the muck. The latest version of Lexus’ Enform infortainment system is here, minus the mouse controller. Instead you have a fair number of buttons and a touchscreen to help you move around. It takes a few moments to wrap your head around where everything is, but once it clicks, the system becomes quite easy to use. However, the system is starting to look somewhat dated when compared to competitors. Plus, I want to ask the person who thought it was a great idea to put the fan control in the system and not have a dedicated knob or buttons for it. Passengers up front get power adjustments with memory, along with heat and cooling. I found the front seats to provide excellent support and the heat was very nice for the extreme cold that I found myself driving the LX in. Second row passengers will find an abundance of head and legroom, along with heated seats and a two-zone climate control system. There is a third row, but that’s best left in case of emergencies as legroom is minimal. The third-row also presents a problem for cargo space. With the seats down, the LX 570 only has 15.5 cubic feet of space. Fold the seats up and space increases to 45 cubic feet, but the seats are still in the cargo area. Now you might wonder why the seats don’t fold into the floor. The answer is the four-wheel drive and off-road equipment takes up all that space. Thoughts on Engine and Ride Are on the Next Page Power for the LX 570 comes from a 5.7L V8 with 383 horsepower and 403 pound-feet of torque. This is paired with a six-speed automatic and a full-time four-wheel drive system. Tipping the scales at just a hair over 6,000 pounds, the V8 engine has its work cut out for it. But thanks to the engine having a decent amount of torque and a quick-shifting automatic, the LX is able to get out of its way with no sweat. Lexus should also be given credit for the amount of refinement done to the engine as it barely makes a murmur when accelerating. The big downside for this powertrain is fuel economy. The EPA rates the LX 570 at 12 City/17 Highway/14 Combined. I was lucky to get 13 MPG as my average for the week. Now as I mentioned earlier, the LX 570 comes packed with a fair amount of off-road equipment and tech. Here is what LX comes with: Adjustable Suspension Hill-Start Assist Turn Assist: Brakes the outside wheel to provide a tighter turning radius Crawl Control: Adjusts throttle and brakes when driving through difficult terrain So how does the LX 570 fare off-road then? Well mother nature was happy to oblige by dropping a few inches of snow during my time with the vehicle. For the most part, the LX was able to drive through unplowed roads with no problem. The four-wheel drive system kept the vehicle moving while the adjustable suspension kept the body above the snow. One downside on the LX was the tires equipped. The Dunlop Grand Trek tires felt like they were scrambling for traction in the snow. If you’re planning to get an LX to drive in the snow, I would recommend swapping tires. Aside from this brief excursion into the snow, the LX did alright around town and on the expressway. With the suspension set in either comfort or normal, the LX glides over bumps and imperfections. Sound deadening is excellent with nary a hint of road and wind noise entering the cabin. Out on the curves, the LX shows signs of body lean. Even with the suspension set in the Sport setting, the lean is noticeable. Steering is slow, giving the feeling that you are driving a tractor and not an SUV. The Lexus LX 570 has the luxuries and off-road tech which puts it in the direct line of the Range Rover. But the poor gas mileage and cargo space make it an outlier in the full-size luxury SUV class. If you are planning to traverse the Rocky Mountains or go on a summer vacation in the Sahara desert, then the LX 570 makes sense. Otherwise, you have a fair number of competitors that offer better fuel economy and a few more luxuries for the price. Disclaimer: Lexus Provided the LX 570, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas Year: 2015 Make: Lexus Model: LX 570 Trim: N/A Engine: 5.7L 32-Valve, DOHC, Dual VVT-i V8 Driveline: Six-Speed Automatic, Full-Time Four-Wheel Drive Horsepower @ RPM: 383 @ 5,600 Torque @ RPM: 403 @ 3,600 Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 12/17/14 Curb Weight: 6,000 lbs Location of Manufacture: Toyota, Aichi Japan Base Price: $82,930 As Tested Price: $90,720 (Includes $925.00 Destination Charge) Options: Mark Levinson Audio System - $2,350 Dual-Screen DVD Rear-Seat Entertainment System - $2,005 Luxury Package - $1,510 Intuitive Park Assist - $1,000 View full article
  6. The full-size luxury SUV marketplace are full of models that will never venture off payment. Such models include the Cadillac Escalade, Lincoln Navigator, and Mercedes-Benz GL that have either basic to somewhat advanced four-wheel drive systems. Then there is the Range Rover which boasts a number of off-road technologies and equipment to get you through some of murkiest conditions on earth. Sure, you never see one tackle an off-road trail unless its featured in a promo video, but it’s nice to know the model can get you through. It makes some wonder if there is a competitor that can match the Range Rover in terms of off-road ability and luxuries. Well Lexus believes they have that competitor in the form of the LX 570. I spent a week in it to see if it can compete. The LX 570 is the sister model to the Toyota Land Cruiser, so a fair number of items are shared between the two. For example, the basic shape of the body are similar. Both models boast similar profiles and key design items such as a large glass area and a split-opening tailgate. At least Lexus’ designers should be credited for trying to make the LX look somewhat different from the Land Cruiser. Such details include flared out fenders boasting 20-inch wheels, and a set of running boards. The front-end gets the brand’s distinctive spindle grille and a set of headlights with LEDs. The addition of the spindle grille seems out of place when compared to the rest of the LX’s design. The interior of the LX 570 further differentiates from the Land Cruiser thanks to a new dashboard layout and some luxury touches. Step inside and you’ll notice the large amount of leather and wood trim used throughout. You’ll also notice a large number of buttons and switches throughout the dash and center console. These control aspects of the four-wheel drive and other systems to get you through the muck. The latest version of Lexus’ Enform infortainment system is here, minus the mouse controller. Instead you have a fair number of buttons and a touchscreen to help you move around. It takes a few moments to wrap your head around where everything is, but once it clicks, the system becomes quite easy to use. However, the system is starting to look somewhat dated when compared to competitors. Plus, I want to ask the person who thought it was a great idea to put the fan control in the system and not have a dedicated knob or buttons for it. Passengers up front get power adjustments with memory, along with heat and cooling. I found the front seats to provide excellent support and the heat was very nice for the extreme cold that I found myself driving the LX in. Second row passengers will find an abundance of head and legroom, along with heated seats and a two-zone climate control system. There is a third row, but that’s best left in case of emergencies as legroom is minimal. The third-row also presents a problem for cargo space. With the seats down, the LX 570 only has 15.5 cubic feet of space. Fold the seats up and space increases to 45 cubic feet, but the seats are still in the cargo area. Now you might wonder why the seats don’t fold into the floor. The answer is the four-wheel drive and off-road equipment takes up all that space. Thoughts on Engine and Ride Are on the Next Page Power for the LX 570 comes from a 5.7L V8 with 383 horsepower and 403 pound-feet of torque. This is paired with a six-speed automatic and a full-time four-wheel drive system. Tipping the scales at just a hair over 6,000 pounds, the V8 engine has its work cut out for it. But thanks to the engine having a decent amount of torque and a quick-shifting automatic, the LX is able to get out of its way with no sweat. Lexus should also be given credit for the amount of refinement done to the engine as it barely makes a murmur when accelerating. The big downside for this powertrain is fuel economy. The EPA rates the LX 570 at 12 City/17 Highway/14 Combined. I was lucky to get 13 MPG as my average for the week. Now as I mentioned earlier, the LX 570 comes packed with a fair amount of off-road equipment and tech. Here is what LX comes with: Adjustable Suspension Hill-Start Assist Turn Assist: Brakes the outside wheel to provide a tighter turning radius Crawl Control: Adjusts throttle and brakes when driving through difficult terrain So how does the LX 570 fare off-road then? Well mother nature was happy to oblige by dropping a few inches of snow during my time with the vehicle. For the most part, the LX was able to drive through unplowed roads with no problem. The four-wheel drive system kept the vehicle moving while the adjustable suspension kept the body above the snow. One downside on the LX was the tires equipped. The Dunlop Grand Trek tires felt like they were scrambling for traction in the snow. If you’re planning to get an LX to drive in the snow, I would recommend swapping tires. Aside from this brief excursion into the snow, the LX did alright around town and on the expressway. With the suspension set in either comfort or normal, the LX glides over bumps and imperfections. Sound deadening is excellent with nary a hint of road and wind noise entering the cabin. Out on the curves, the LX shows signs of body lean. Even with the suspension set in the Sport setting, the lean is noticeable. Steering is slow, giving the feeling that you are driving a tractor and not an SUV. The Lexus LX 570 has the luxuries and off-road tech which puts it in the direct line of the Range Rover. But the poor gas mileage and cargo space make it an outlier in the full-size luxury SUV class. If you are planning to traverse the Rocky Mountains or go on a summer vacation in the Sahara desert, then the LX 570 makes sense. Otherwise, you have a fair number of competitors that offer better fuel economy and a few more luxuries for the price. Disclaimer: Lexus Provided the LX 570, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas Year: 2015 Make: Lexus Model: LX 570 Trim: N/A Engine: 5.7L 32-Valve, DOHC, Dual VVT-i V8 Driveline: Six-Speed Automatic, Full-Time Four-Wheel Drive Horsepower @ RPM: 383 @ 5,600 Torque @ RPM: 403 @ 3,600 Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 12/17/14 Curb Weight: 6,000 lbs Location of Manufacture: Toyota, Aichi Japan Base Price: $82,930 As Tested Price: $90,720 (Includes $925.00 Destination Charge) Options: Mark Levinson Audio System - $2,350 Dual-Screen DVD Rear-Seat Entertainment System - $2,005 Luxury Package - $1,510 Intuitive Park Assist - $1,000

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