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Found 269 results

  1. A user on Reddit posted today an image showing an internal document from Mazda Canada detailing some of changes coming to the 2019 CX-5. The highlights mention that the CX-5 will be getting the turbocharged 2.5L four-cylinder from the CX-9, G-Vectoring Control Plus (we're assuming this is updated version of the system); changes to the exterior, the top-line Signature trim becoming available, and compatibility with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto. The mention of the turbo engine confirms a CAFE document we reported back in June listing the 2019 CX-5 with the turbo engine. If you're wondering about the trims, that's for Mazdas sold in Canada - they won't changing the trim line that significantly for the U.S. at this moment. Source: Reddit View full article
  2. A user on Reddit posted today an image showing an internal document from Mazda Canada detailing some of changes coming to the 2019 CX-5. The highlights mention that the CX-5 will be getting the turbocharged 2.5L four-cylinder from the CX-9, G-Vectoring Control Plus (we're assuming this is updated version of the system); changes to the exterior, the top-line Signature trim becoming available, and compatibility with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto. The mention of the turbo engine confirms a CAFE document we reported back in June listing the 2019 CX-5 with the turbo engine. If you're wondering about the trims, that's for Mazdas sold in Canada - they won't changing the trim line that significantly for the U.S. at this moment. Source: Reddit
  3. A few weeks ago, I wrote a comparison test between the 2018 Mazda CX-9 and Volkswagen Atlas. It was a close fight, but the Atlas ended up being the victor as it proved to be the better all-around three-row crossover. I find myself comparing these two brands once again, this time with their compact crossovers. Like their larger brethren, the two models take different approaches. The Mazda CX-5 goes for something that provides a premium feel and exciting drive, while the Volkswagen Tiguan uses space and comfort as its guide. Which one of these crossovers Which one of these crossovers is right for you? Exterior Mazda’s design team believed evolution would be the right approach for the second-generation CX-5’s design and we have to agree. Taking the first-generation model, designers added more curves to the body, widened the front grille, and angled the front LED headlights. In what is becoming a very crowded class, the CX-5 stands tall, especially when wearing the optional Soul Red paint. Like the Atlas, the Volkswagen Tiguan’s shape can be explained as “looking like a bit of a square, but a posh square.” Little details such as the three-bar grille, LED daytime-running lights, and slightly bulging fenders help give the Tiguan a touch of class. The optional Habanero Orange Metallic paint color on my test vehicle does show Volkswagen is willing to step outside of its comfort zone. In terms of dimensions, the Tiguan is six inches longer in overall length and rides on a wheelbase that is 3.6-inches longer than the CX-5. Interior The Tiguan’s interior follows Volkswagen’s ethos of keeping it functional in terms of the design. It features simple dash and design touches such as a silver finish for various trim pieces. Volkswagen does make up for the boring design with an excellent layout of controls. For example, the climate control system is slightly angled upward to not only make it easier to reach, but also make it less of a hassle to look down and see the current settings. Material quality is average for this type of vehicle with a mix of hard and soft plastics. The front seats in the Tiguan SE offer a power recline and manual adjustments for fore/aft and height. I really liked the seats in the Tiguan as they provided excellent comfort and firmness for any trip distance. But the Tiguan really surprises in the back seat with head and legroom similar to what you’ll find on a full-size SUV. Passengers sitting back here can also move the seats back and forth, and recline to make themselves more comfortable. The long length of the Tiguan allows for a third-row seat. The seat is standard on front-wheel drive models and optional for all-wheel drive variants. The third-row should only be used for small kids as there is a minuscule amount of legroom. Another downside to the third-row is cargo space. The third-row causes a significant reduction in cargo space. With the third-row folded, it offers 4.6 cubic feet less than the two-row variant (33 vs. 37.6). Fold the second-row and the reduction becomes larger - 7.8 cubic feet. I would recommend skipping the third-row option if you opt for an AWD Tiguan. Like the exterior, the CX-5’s interior stands out. The dash shows Mazda’s effort on trying to make their interiors feel more like a luxury vehicle with sculpted contours, brushed aluminum, soft-touch plastics with a grain texture, and stitching on certain trim pieces. Compared to the Tiguan, the CX-5’s control layout is more spread out, making it somewhat difficult to find and reach certain controls. The Grand Touring tester featured power adjustments for both front seats. The seats will feel a bit too firm for some passengers, but I found them to be just right. It would have been awesome if Mazda provided ventilation for the front seats to bolster their premium ambitions. The CX-5’s back seat offers a decent amount of headroom for those under six-feet. Legroom is somewhat lacking when put against the competition. I found that my knees were almost touching the back side of the front seat. Cargo space is right in the middle with 30.9 cubic feet with the rear seats up and 59.6 when folded. Infotainment A seven-inch touchscreen featuring the Mazda Connect infotainment system and a rotary knob controller is standard on all CX-5s. Grand Touring models get navigation as standard, while the Touring gets it as an option. Mazda Connect is a mixed bag. The interface is beginning to look somewhat old due to the use of dark colors and a dull screen. Also, trying to figure out which parts of the system are touch-enabled becomes quite tedious as there is no way to tell except through trial and error. There is no Apple CarPlay or Android Auto compatibility, but I’m hoping the 2019 model will get it. For the Tiguan, Volkswagen offers three different infotainment systems ranging from 6.5 to 8-inches. Apple CarPlay and Android Auto compatibility come standard. The current Volkswagen infotainment system is one of the best thanks in part to snappy performance and a simple interface. You can do various smartphone gestures such as swiping to move around the system. One disappointment is the lack of any sort of haptic feedback when touching any of the shortcut buttons sitting on either side of the screen. We would also recommend keeping a cloth in the Tiguan as the glass surface for the infotainment system becomes littered with fingerprints. Like in the Atlas I reviewed a few weeks ago, the Tiguan experienced an issue with Apple CarPlay. Applications such as Google Music or Spotify running in CarPlay would freeze up. I could exit out to the CarPlay interface, but was unable to unfreeze the applications unless I restarted the vehicle. Resetting my iPhone solved this issue. Powertrain Under the CX-5’s hood is a 2.5L four-cylinder producing 187 horsepower and 186 pound-feet (up one from the 2017 model). Mazda has added cylinder deactivation for the 2018 model that allows the engine to run on just two cylinders to improve fuel efficiency. This is paired with a six-speed automatic and all-wheel drive. For the Tiguan, Volkswagen has dropped in a turbocharged 2.0L four-cylinder engine producing 184 horsepower and 221 pound-feet of torque. An eight-speed automatic and all-wheel drive complete the package. With a higher torque figure and being available between 1,600 to 4,300 rpm, the Tiguan should leave the CX-5 in the dust. But at the stoplight drag race, the CX-5 bests the Tiguan thanks to a sharper throttle response and a steady stream of power. The Tiguan’s turbo-four gets hit with a double-whammy of turbo-lag and a somewhat confused eight-speed automatic transmission, making it feel anything but eager to get off the line. As speeds climb, the story changes. The Tiguan’s engine feels more willing to get moving whenever you need to make a pass or merge onto a freeway. The CX-5’s engine runs out of steam and you’ll need to really work it to get up to speed at a decent rate. Fuel Economy The EPA says the 2018 Mazda CX-5 AWD will return 24 City/30 Highway/26 Combined, while the 2018 Volkswagen Tiguan AWD returns 21 City/27 Highway/23 Combined. Both models returned high fuel economy averages; the CX-5 return 28.5 while the Tiguan got 27.3 mpg during my week-long test. Both models were driven on mix of 60 percent city and 40 percent highway. Ride & Handling When I reviewed the 2017 Mazda CX-5, I said that it carried on the mantle of being a fun-to-drive crossover set by the first-generation. Driving on some of the back roads around Detroit, the CX-5 felt very agile and showed little body roll. The steering provides sharp responses and excellent weighting. The sporting edge does mean a firm ride, allowing some road imperfections to come inside. Not much road or wind noise comes inside. Volkswagen took a different approach with the Tiguan’s ride and handling characteristics. On rough roads, the Tiguan provides a very cushioned ride on some of the roughest payment. This soft ride does hurt the Tiguan when cornering as there is slightly more body roll. But that doesn’t make the Tiguan a bad driving crossover. The chassis feels very willing when pushed and the steering provides a direct feel. Value The 2018 Volkswagen Tiguan SE AWD begins at $30,230. This particular tester came to $31,575 with the optional Habanero Orange Metallic and fog lights. But the 2018 Mazda CX-5 Touring comes with more equipment such as radar cruise control, lane departure warning, 19-inch wheels, LED headlights, and power adjustments for the driver for only $2,175 less than the Tiguan SE’s base price. You can add navigation, Bose audio system, and sunroof as part of $1,200 Preferred Equipment package. When it comes to the midlevel, it is no contest as the CX-5 walks away. The script flips however when you put the 2018 CX-5 Grand Touring under the microscope. The AWD version begins at $30,945 and with a few options such as the Soul Red paint and Premium package, the vehicle seen here comes to $34,685. But you can get into the Tiguan SEL AWD that adds adaptive cruise control, power liftgate, and navigation for only $2,295 less than our as-tested CX-5. While the CX-5 does offer more of a premium interior, the larger interior and slightly better infotainment system give the Tiguan a slight edge. Verdict It feels weird to describe the verdict between the two compact crossovers as a decision to satisfy your desires or needs. The 2018 Mazda CX-5 falls into the former as it boasts a handsome look that very few models can match, luxurious interior, and handling characteristics that make you feel like you’re driving a sports car. As for the Tiguan, it falls in the latter camp by offering a spacious interior, smooth ride, and a better infotainment system. I consider these two to be the best-in-class. But deciding which one is better will ultimately come down to deciding whether to give into your wants or needs. Disclaimer: Mazda and Volkswagen Provided the vehicles, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas Year: 2018 Make: Mazda Model: CX-5 Trim: Grand Touring AWD Engine: 2.5L DOHC 16-Valve Inline-Four Driveline: Six-Speed Automatic, All-Wheel Drive Horsepower @ RPM: 187 @ 6,000 Torque @ RPM: 186 @4,000 Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 24/30/26 Curb Weight: N/A Location of Manufacture: Hiroshima, Japan Base Price: $30,945 As Tested Price: $34,685 (Includes $975.00 Destination Charge) Options: Premium Package - $1,395.00 Soul Red Crystal Paint - $595.00 Illuminated Door Sill Plates - $400.00 Retractable Cover Cover - $250.00 Rear Bumper Guard - $125.00 Year: 2018 Make: Volkswagen Model: Tiguan Trim: SE 4Motion Engine: 2.0L Turbocharged 16-Valve DOHC TSI Four-Cylinder Driveline: Eight-Speed Automatic, All-Wheel Drive Horsepower @ RPM: 184 @ 4,400 Torque @ RPM: 221 @ 1,600 Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 21/27/23 Curb Weight: 3,858 lbs Location of Manufacture: Puebla, Mexico Base Price: $30,230 As Tested Price: $31,575 (Includes $900.00 Destination Charge) Options: Habanero Orange Metallic - $295.00 Front Fog Lights - $150.00 View full article
  4. loki

    Mazda diesel hybrid cx-5

    https://asia.nikkei.com/Business/Business-Trends/Mazda-to-release-diesel-hybrid-based-on-CX-5-in-2020
  5. William Maley

    Review: 2018 Mazda CX-5 vs. Volkswagen Tiguan

    A few weeks ago, I wrote a comparison test between the 2018 Mazda CX-9 and Volkswagen Atlas. It was a close fight, but the Atlas ended up being the victor as it proved to be the better all-around three-row crossover. I find myself comparing these two brands once again, this time with their compact crossovers. Like their larger brethren, the two models take different approaches. The Mazda CX-5 goes for something that provides a premium feel and exciting drive, while the Volkswagen Tiguan uses space and comfort as its guide. Which one of these crossovers Which one of these crossovers is right for you? Exterior Mazda’s design team believed evolution would be the right approach for the second-generation CX-5’s design and we have to agree. Taking the first-generation model, designers added more curves to the body, widened the front grille, and angled the front LED headlights. In what is becoming a very crowded class, the CX-5 stands tall, especially when wearing the optional Soul Red paint. Like the Atlas, the Volkswagen Tiguan’s shape can be explained as “looking like a bit of a square, but a posh square.” Little details such as the three-bar grille, LED daytime-running lights, and slightly bulging fenders help give the Tiguan a touch of class. The optional Habanero Orange Metallic paint color on my test vehicle does show Volkswagen is willing to step outside of its comfort zone. In terms of dimensions, the Tiguan is six inches longer in overall length and rides on a wheelbase that is 3.6-inches longer than the CX-5. Interior The Tiguan’s interior follows Volkswagen’s ethos of keeping it functional in terms of the design. It features simple dash and design touches such as a silver finish for various trim pieces. Volkswagen does make up for the boring design with an excellent layout of controls. For example, the climate control system is slightly angled upward to not only make it easier to reach, but also make it less of a hassle to look down and see the current settings. Material quality is average for this type of vehicle with a mix of hard and soft plastics. The front seats in the Tiguan SE offer a power recline and manual adjustments for fore/aft and height. I really liked the seats in the Tiguan as they provided excellent comfort and firmness for any trip distance. But the Tiguan really surprises in the back seat with head and legroom similar to what you’ll find on a full-size SUV. Passengers sitting back here can also move the seats back and forth, and recline to make themselves more comfortable. The long length of the Tiguan allows for a third-row seat. The seat is standard on front-wheel drive models and optional for all-wheel drive variants. The third-row should only be used for small kids as there is a minuscule amount of legroom. Another downside to the third-row is cargo space. The third-row causes a significant reduction in cargo space. With the third-row folded, it offers 4.6 cubic feet less than the two-row variant (33 vs. 37.6). Fold the second-row and the reduction becomes larger - 7.8 cubic feet. I would recommend skipping the third-row option if you opt for an AWD Tiguan. Like the exterior, the CX-5’s interior stands out. The dash shows Mazda’s effort on trying to make their interiors feel more like a luxury vehicle with sculpted contours, brushed aluminum, soft-touch plastics with a grain texture, and stitching on certain trim pieces. Compared to the Tiguan, the CX-5’s control layout is more spread out, making it somewhat difficult to find and reach certain controls. The Grand Touring tester featured power adjustments for both front seats. The seats will feel a bit too firm for some passengers, but I found them to be just right. It would have been awesome if Mazda provided ventilation for the front seats to bolster their premium ambitions. The CX-5’s back seat offers a decent amount of headroom for those under six-feet. Legroom is somewhat lacking when put against the competition. I found that my knees were almost touching the back side of the front seat. Cargo space is right in the middle with 30.9 cubic feet with the rear seats up and 59.6 when folded. Infotainment A seven-inch touchscreen featuring the Mazda Connect infotainment system and a rotary knob controller is standard on all CX-5s. Grand Touring models get navigation as standard, while the Touring gets it as an option. Mazda Connect is a mixed bag. The interface is beginning to look somewhat old due to the use of dark colors and a dull screen. Also, trying to figure out which parts of the system are touch-enabled becomes quite tedious as there is no way to tell except through trial and error. There is no Apple CarPlay or Android Auto compatibility, but I’m hoping the 2019 model will get it. For the Tiguan, Volkswagen offers three different infotainment systems ranging from 6.5 to 8-inches. Apple CarPlay and Android Auto compatibility come standard. The current Volkswagen infotainment system is one of the best thanks in part to snappy performance and a simple interface. You can do various smartphone gestures such as swiping to move around the system. One disappointment is the lack of any sort of haptic feedback when touching any of the shortcut buttons sitting on either side of the screen. We would also recommend keeping a cloth in the Tiguan as the glass surface for the infotainment system becomes littered with fingerprints. Like in the Atlas I reviewed a few weeks ago, the Tiguan experienced an issue with Apple CarPlay. Applications such as Google Music or Spotify running in CarPlay would freeze up. I could exit out to the CarPlay interface, but was unable to unfreeze the applications unless I restarted the vehicle. Resetting my iPhone solved this issue. Powertrain Under the CX-5’s hood is a 2.5L four-cylinder producing 187 horsepower and 186 pound-feet (up one from the 2017 model). Mazda has added cylinder deactivation for the 2018 model that allows the engine to run on just two cylinders to improve fuel efficiency. This is paired with a six-speed automatic and all-wheel drive. For the Tiguan, Volkswagen has dropped in a turbocharged 2.0L four-cylinder engine producing 184 horsepower and 221 pound-feet of torque. An eight-speed automatic and all-wheel drive complete the package. With a higher torque figure and being available between 1,600 to 4,300 rpm, the Tiguan should leave the CX-5 in the dust. But at the stoplight drag race, the CX-5 bests the Tiguan thanks to a sharper throttle response and a steady stream of power. The Tiguan’s turbo-four gets hit with a double-whammy of turbo-lag and a somewhat confused eight-speed automatic transmission, making it feel anything but eager to get off the line. As speeds climb, the story changes. The Tiguan’s engine feels more willing to get moving whenever you need to make a pass or merge onto a freeway. The CX-5’s engine runs out of steam and you’ll need to really work it to get up to speed at a decent rate. Fuel Economy The EPA says the 2018 Mazda CX-5 AWD will return 24 City/30 Highway/26 Combined, while the 2018 Volkswagen Tiguan AWD returns 21 City/27 Highway/23 Combined. Both models returned high fuel economy averages; the CX-5 return 28.5 while the Tiguan got 27.3 mpg during my week-long test. Both models were driven on mix of 60 percent city and 40 percent highway. Ride & Handling When I reviewed the 2017 Mazda CX-5, I said that it carried on the mantle of being a fun-to-drive crossover set by the first-generation. Driving on some of the back roads around Detroit, the CX-5 felt very agile and showed little body roll. The steering provides sharp responses and excellent weighting. The sporting edge does mean a firm ride, allowing some road imperfections to come inside. Not much road or wind noise comes inside. Volkswagen took a different approach with the Tiguan’s ride and handling characteristics. On rough roads, the Tiguan provides a very cushioned ride on some of the roughest payment. This soft ride does hurt the Tiguan when cornering as there is slightly more body roll. But that doesn’t make the Tiguan a bad driving crossover. The chassis feels very willing when pushed and the steering provides a direct feel. Value The 2018 Volkswagen Tiguan SE AWD begins at $30,230. This particular tester came to $31,575 with the optional Habanero Orange Metallic and fog lights. But the 2018 Mazda CX-5 Touring comes with more equipment such as radar cruise control, lane departure warning, 19-inch wheels, LED headlights, and power adjustments for the driver for only $2,175 less than the Tiguan SE’s base price. You can add navigation, Bose audio system, and sunroof as part of $1,200 Preferred Equipment package. When it comes to the midlevel, it is no contest as the CX-5 walks away. The script flips however when you put the 2018 CX-5 Grand Touring under the microscope. The AWD version begins at $30,945 and with a few options such as the Soul Red paint and Premium package, the vehicle seen here comes to $34,685. But you can get into the Tiguan SEL AWD that adds adaptive cruise control, power liftgate, and navigation for only $2,295 less than our as-tested CX-5. While the CX-5 does offer more of a premium interior, the larger interior and slightly better infotainment system give the Tiguan a slight edge. Verdict It feels weird to describe the verdict between the two compact crossovers as a decision to satisfy your desires or needs. The 2018 Mazda CX-5 falls into the former as it boasts a handsome look that very few models can match, luxurious interior, and handling characteristics that make you feel like you’re driving a sports car. As for the Tiguan, it falls in the latter camp by offering a spacious interior, smooth ride, and a better infotainment system. I consider these two to be the best-in-class. But deciding which one is better will ultimately come down to deciding whether to give into your wants or needs. Disclaimer: Mazda and Volkswagen Provided the vehicles, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas Year: 2018 Make: Mazda Model: CX-5 Trim: Grand Touring AWD Engine: 2.5L DOHC 16-Valve Inline-Four Driveline: Six-Speed Automatic, All-Wheel Drive Horsepower @ RPM: 187 @ 6,000 Torque @ RPM: 186 @4,000 Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 24/30/26 Curb Weight: N/A Location of Manufacture: Hiroshima, Japan Base Price: $30,945 As Tested Price: $34,685 (Includes $975.00 Destination Charge) Options: Premium Package - $1,395.00 Soul Red Crystal Paint - $595.00 Illuminated Door Sill Plates - $400.00 Retractable Cover Cover - $250.00 Rear Bumper Guard - $125.00 Year: 2018 Make: Volkswagen Model: Tiguan Trim: SE 4Motion Engine: 2.0L Turbocharged 16-Valve DOHC TSI Four-Cylinder Driveline: Eight-Speed Automatic, All-Wheel Drive Horsepower @ RPM: 184 @ 4,400 Torque @ RPM: 221 @ 1,600 Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 21/27/23 Curb Weight: 3,858 lbs Location of Manufacture: Puebla, Mexico Base Price: $30,230 As Tested Price: $31,575 (Includes $900.00 Destination Charge) Options: Habanero Orange Metallic - $295.00 Front Fog Lights - $150.00
  6. The three-row full-size crossover has taken the place of large SUVs as the vehicle of choice for growing families. Crossovers offer the tall ride height and large space, but not at the cost of fuel economy and ride quality. Recently, I spent a week in the 2018 Mazda CX-9 and Volkswagen Atlas. These two models could not be any different; one is focused on providing driving enjoyment, while the other is concerned about providing enough space for cargo and passengers. Trying to determine which one was the best would prove to be a difficult task. Exterior There is no contest between these two when it comes to design as the CX-9 blows the Atlas out of the water. The overall look balances aggressive and elegance traits. For the front, Mazda has angled the clip to give off a sporting profile while a large grille and a set of slim headlights accentuate this. Move around to the side and you’ll notice the CX-9 has quite a long front end and the rear roof pillars are angled slightly forward. These design cues help make the CX-9 look slightly smaller than it actually is. Someone once described a Volkswagen vehicle as “looking like a bit of a square, but a posh square.” That’s how I would sum up the Atlas’ design; it is basically a box on wheels. There are some nice touches such as the LED headlights that come standard on all models and chunky fenders. The 18-inch alloy wheels that come with the SE w/Technology look somewhat small on the Atlas, but that is likely due to the large size of the vehicle. Interior The Atlas’ interior very much follows the ideals of the exterior, which are uncomplicated and utilitarian. While it does fall flat when compared to the CX-9’s luxury design, Volkswagen nails the ergonomics. Most of the controls are within easy reach of driver and passenger. One touch that I really like is the climate control slightly angled upward. Not only does this make it easier to reach, but you can quickly glance down to see the current settings. There is only a small amount of soft-touch material used throughout the Atlas’ interior, the rest being made up of hard plastics. While that is slightly disappointing as other crossovers are adding more soft-touch materials, Volkswagen knows that kids are quite rough to vehicles. If there is one benefit to Volkswagen’s plain styling on the outside, it is the massive interior. I haven’t been in such a spacious three-row crossover since the last GM Lambda I drove. Beginning with the third-row, I found that my 5’9” frame actually fit with only my knees just touching the rear of the second-row. Moving the second row slightly forward allows for a little more legroom. Getting in and out of the third-row is very easy as the second-row tilts and moves forward, providing a wide space. This particular tester came with a second-row bench seat. A set of captain chairs are available as an option on SE and above. Sitting back here felt like I was in a limousine with abundant head and legroom. The seats slide and recline which allows passengers to find that right position. The only downside to both rear rows is there isn’t enough padding for long trips. For the front seat, the driver gets a ten-way power seat while the passenger makes do with only a power recline and manual adjustments. No complaints about comfort as the Atlas’ front seats had the right amount of padding and firmness for any trip length. The cargo area is quite huge. With all seats up, the Atlas offers 20.6 cubic feet of space. This increases to 55.5 cubic feet when the third-row is folded and 96.8 cubic feet with both rows folded. Only the new Chevrolet Traverse beats the Atlas with measurements of 23, 58.1, and 98.2 cubic feet. As a way to differentiate itself from other automakers, Mazda is trying to become more premium. This is clearly evident in the CX-9’s interior. The dash is beautiful with contouring used throughout, and a mixture of brushed aluminum and soft-touch plastics with a grain texture. If I were to cover up the Mazda badge on the steering wheel and ask you to identify the brand, you might think it was from a German automaker. Ergonomics aren’t quite as good as the Atlas as you have to reach for certain controls like those for the climate system. The CX-9’s front seats don’t feel quite as spacious when compared to the Atlas with a narrow cockpit and the rakish exterior are to blame. Still, most drivers should be able to find a position that works. The seats themselves have a sporting edge with increased side bolstering and firm cushions. I found the seats to be quite comfortable and didn’t have issues of not having enough support. Moving to the second row, Mazda only offers a bench seat configuration. This is disappointing considering all of the CX-9’s competitors offer captain chairs as an option. There is more than enough legroom for most passengers, but those six-feet and above will find headroom to be a bit tight. Getting into the third-row is slightly tough. Like the Atlas, the CX-9’s second row slides and tilts to allow access. But space is noticeably smaller and does require some gymnastics to pass through. Once seated, I found it to be quite cramped with little head and legroom. This is best reserved for small kids. Cargo area is another weak point to the CX-9. With both back seats up, there is only 14.4 cubic feet. This puts it behind most of the competition aside from the GMC Acadia which has 12.8. It doesn’t get any better when the seats are folded. With the third-row down, the CX-9 has 38.2 cubic feet. Fold down the second-row and it expands to 71.2 cubic feet. To use the GMC Acadia again, it offers 41.7 cubic feet when the third-row is folded and rises to 79 with both rows. Keep in mind, the Acadia is about six inches shorter than the CX-9. Infotainment All CX-9’s come equipped with the Mazda Connect infotainment system. The base Sport comes with a 7-inch touchscreen, while the Touring and above use a larger 8-inch screen. A rotary knob and set of redundant buttons on the center console control the system. Using Mazda Connect is a bit of a mixed bag. The interface is beginning to look a bit dated with the use of dark colors and a dull screen. Trying to use the touchscreen is an exercise in frustration as it is not easy to tell which parts are touch-enabled and not. On the upside, moving around Mazda Connect is a breeze when using the knob and buttons. Currently, Mazda doesn’t offer Apple CarPlay or Android Auto compatibility. Thankfully, this is being remedied with the 2019 model as Touring models and above will come with both. For the Atlas, Volkswagen offers three different systems. A 6.5-inch touchscreen is standard on the S. Moving up to either the SE, SE w/Technology, or SEL nets you an 8-inch screen. The top line SEL Premium adds navigation to the 8-inch system. All of the systems feature Apple CarPlay and Android Auto compatibility. The current Volkswagen system is one of the easiest to use thanks in part to intuitive menu structure and quick responses. Moving through menus or presets is easy as the system reacts to the swiping gesture like you would do on your smartphone. There are a couple of downsides to the Volkswagen system. One is there is no haptic feedback when pressing the shortcut buttons on either side of the screen. Also, the glass surface becomes littered with fingerprints very quickly. I did have an issue with the system when trying to use Apple CarPlay. At times, applications such as Spotify would freeze up. I could exit out to the CarPlay interface, but was unable to get the apps unfrozen until I shut the vehicle off. After resetting my iPhone, this problem went away. This leaves me wondering how much of this problem was with my phone and not the infotainment system. Powertrain Both of these crossovers are equipped with turbocharged four-cylinder engines. The CX-9 has a 2.5L producing either 227 or 250 (on premium fuel) horsepower and 310 pound-feet of torque. The Atlas has a 2.0L producing 235 horsepower and 258 pound-feet. An optional 3.6L V6 with 276 horsepower is available for the Atlas. For the Mazda, power is routed to a six-speed automatic and the choice of front or all-wheel drive. The Volkswagen makes do with an eight-speed automatic and front-wheel drive only. If you want AWD, you need the V6. Thanks to its higher torque figure, the CX-9 leaves the Atlas in the dust. There is barely any lag coming from the turbo-four. Instead, it delivers a linear throttle response and a steady stream of power. NVH levels are noticeably quieter than the Atlas’ turbo-four. The six-speed automatic delivers seamless shifts and is quick to downshift when you need extra power such as merging. The turbo-four in the Atlas seems slightly overwhelmed at first. When leaving a stop, I found that there was a fair amount of turbo-lag. This is only exacerbated if the stop-start system is turned on. Once the turbo was spooling, the four-cylinder did a surprising job of moving the 4,222 pound Atlas with no issue. Stab the throttle and the engine comes into life, delivering a smooth and constant stream of power. The eight-speed automatic provided quick and smooth shifts, although it was sometimes hesitant to downshift when more power was called for. Fuel Economy Both of these models are close in fuel economy. EPA says the CX-9 AWD should return 20 City/26 Highway/23 Combined, while the Atlas 2.0T will get 22/26/24. During the week, the CX-9 returned 22.5 mpg in mostly city driving and the Atlas got 27.3 mpg with a 60/40 mix of highway and city driving. The eight-speed transmission in the Atlas makes a huge difference. Ride & Handling The CX-9 is clearly the driver’s choice. On a winding road, the crossover feels quite nimble thanks to a well-tuned suspension. There is a slight amount of body roll due to the tall ride height, but nothing that will sway your confidence. Steering has some heft when turning and feels quite responsive. Despite the firm suspension, the CX-9’s ride is supple enough to iron out most bumps. Only large imperfections and bumps would make their way inside. Barely any wind and road noise made it inside the cabin. The Atlas isn’t far behind in handling. Volkswagen’s suspension turning helps keep body roll in check and makes the crossover feel smaller than it actually is. The only weak point is the steering which feels somewhat light when turning. Ride quality is slightly better than the CX-9 as Atlas feels like riding on a magic carpet when driving on bumpy roads. Some of this can be attributed to smaller wheels. There is slightly more wind noise coming inside the cabin. Value It would be unfair to directly compare these two crossovers due to the large gap in price. Instead, I will be comparing them with the other’s similar trim. The 2018 Volkswagen Atlas SE with Technology begins at $35,690 for the 2.0T FWD. With destination, my test car came to $36,615, The Technology adds a lot of desirable features such as three-zone climate control, adaptive cruise control, automatic emergency braking, blind spot monitoring with rear-cross traffic alert, forward collision warning, and lane departure alert. The Mazda CX-9 Touring is slightly less expensive at $35,995 with destination and matches the Atlas on standard features, including all of the safety kit. But we’re giving the Atlas the slight edge as you do get more space for not that much more money. Over at the CX-9, the Grand Touring AWD begins at $42,270. With a couple of options including the Soul Red paint, the as-tested price came to $43,905. The comparable Atlas V6 SEL with 4Motion is only $30 more expensive when you factor in destination. Both come closely matched in terms of equipment with the only differences being the Grand Touring has navigation, while the SEL comes with a panoramic sunroof. This one is a draw as it will come down whether space or luxury is more important to you. Verdict Coming in second is the Mazda CX-9. It may have the sharpest exterior in the class, a premium interior that could embarrass some luxury cars, and pleasing driving characteristics. But ultimately, the CX-9 falls down on the key thing buyers want; space. It trails most everyone in passenger and cargo space. That is ultimately the price you pay for all of the positives listed. For a first attempt, Volkswagen knocked it out of the park with the Atlas. It is a bit sluggish when leaving a stop and doesn’t have as luxurious of an interior as the CX-9. But Volkswagen gave the Atlas one of the largest interiors of the class, a chassis that balances a smooth ride with excellent body control, impressive fuel economy, and a price that won’t break the bank. Both of these crossovers are impressive and worthy of being at the top of the consideration list. But at the end of the day, the Atlas does the three-row crossover better than the CX-9. Disclaimer: Mazda and Volkswagen Provided the Vehicles, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas Year: 2018 Make: Mazda Model: CX-9 Trim: Grand Touring AWD Engine: Turbocharged 2.5L Skyactiv-G Four-Cylinder Driveline: Six-Speed Automatic, All-Wheel Drive Horsepower @ RPM: 227 @ 5,000 (Regular), 250 @ 5,000 (Premium) Torque @ RPM: 310 @ 2,000 rpm Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 20/26/23 Curb Weight: 4,361 lbs Location of Manufacture: Hiroshima, Japan Base Price: $42,470 As Tested Price: $43,905 (Includes $940.00 Destination Charge) Options: Soul Red Metallic - $595.00 Cargo Mat - $100.00 Year: 2018 Make: Volkswagen Model: Atlas Trim: 2.0T SE w/Technology Engine: Turbocharged 2.0L DOHC 16-Valve TSI Four-Cylinder Driveline: Eight-Speed Automatic, Front-Wheel Drive Horsepower @ RPM: 235 @ 4,500 Torque @ RPM: 258 @ 1,600 Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 22/26/24 Curb Weight: 4,222 lbs Location of Manufacture: Chattanooga, TN Base Price: $35,690 As Tested Price: $36,615 (Includes $925.00 Destination Charge) Options: N/A View full article
  7. William Maley

    Review: 2018 Mazda CX-9 vs. Volkswagen Atlas

    The three-row full-size crossover has taken the place of large SUVs as the vehicle of choice for growing families. Crossovers offer the tall ride height and large space, but not at the cost of fuel economy and ride quality. Recently, I spent a week in the 2018 Mazda CX-9 and Volkswagen Atlas. These two models could not be any different; one is focused on providing driving enjoyment, while the other is concerned about providing enough space for cargo and passengers. Trying to determine which one was the best would prove to be a difficult task. Exterior There is no contest between these two when it comes to design as the CX-9 blows the Atlas out of the water. The overall look balances aggressive and elegance traits. For the front, Mazda has angled the clip to give off a sporting profile while a large grille and a set of slim headlights accentuate this. Move around to the side and you’ll notice the CX-9 has quite a long front end and the rear roof pillars are angled slightly forward. These design cues help make the CX-9 look slightly smaller than it actually is. Someone once described a Volkswagen vehicle as “looking like a bit of a square, but a posh square.” That’s how I would sum up the Atlas’ design; it is basically a box on wheels. There are some nice touches such as the LED headlights that come standard on all models and chunky fenders. The 18-inch alloy wheels that come with the SE w/Technology look somewhat small on the Atlas, but that is likely due to the large size of the vehicle. Interior The Atlas’ interior very much follows the ideals of the exterior, which are uncomplicated and utilitarian. While it does fall flat when compared to the CX-9’s luxury design, Volkswagen nails the ergonomics. Most of the controls are within easy reach of driver and passenger. One touch that I really like is the climate control slightly angled upward. Not only does this make it easier to reach, but you can quickly glance down to see the current settings. There is only a small amount of soft-touch material used throughout the Atlas’ interior, the rest being made up of hard plastics. While that is slightly disappointing as other crossovers are adding more soft-touch materials, Volkswagen knows that kids are quite rough to vehicles. If there is one benefit to Volkswagen’s plain styling on the outside, it is the massive interior. I haven’t been in such a spacious three-row crossover since the last GM Lambda I drove. Beginning with the third-row, I found that my 5’9” frame actually fit with only my knees just touching the rear of the second-row. Moving the second row slightly forward allows for a little more legroom. Getting in and out of the third-row is very easy as the second-row tilts and moves forward, providing a wide space. This particular tester came with a second-row bench seat. A set of captain chairs are available as an option on SE and above. Sitting back here felt like I was in a limousine with abundant head and legroom. The seats slide and recline which allows passengers to find that right position. The only downside to both rear rows is there isn’t enough padding for long trips. For the front seat, the driver gets a ten-way power seat while the passenger makes do with only a power recline and manual adjustments. No complaints about comfort as the Atlas’ front seats had the right amount of padding and firmness for any trip length. The cargo area is quite huge. With all seats up, the Atlas offers 20.6 cubic feet of space. This increases to 55.5 cubic feet when the third-row is folded and 96.8 cubic feet with both rows folded. Only the new Chevrolet Traverse beats the Atlas with measurements of 23, 58.1, and 98.2 cubic feet. As a way to differentiate itself from other automakers, Mazda is trying to become more premium. This is clearly evident in the CX-9’s interior. The dash is beautiful with contouring used throughout, and a mixture of brushed aluminum and soft-touch plastics with a grain texture. If I were to cover up the Mazda badge on the steering wheel and ask you to identify the brand, you might think it was from a German automaker. Ergonomics aren’t quite as good as the Atlas as you have to reach for certain controls like those for the climate system. The CX-9’s front seats don’t feel quite as spacious when compared to the Atlas with a narrow cockpit and the rakish exterior are to blame. Still, most drivers should be able to find a position that works. The seats themselves have a sporting edge with increased side bolstering and firm cushions. I found the seats to be quite comfortable and didn’t have issues of not having enough support. Moving to the second row, Mazda only offers a bench seat configuration. This is disappointing considering all of the CX-9’s competitors offer captain chairs as an option. There is more than enough legroom for most passengers, but those six-feet and above will find headroom to be a bit tight. Getting into the third-row is slightly tough. Like the Atlas, the CX-9’s second row slides and tilts to allow access. But space is noticeably smaller and does require some gymnastics to pass through. Once seated, I found it to be quite cramped with little head and legroom. This is best reserved for small kids. Cargo area is another weak point to the CX-9. With both back seats up, there is only 14.4 cubic feet. This puts it behind most of the competition aside from the GMC Acadia which has 12.8. It doesn’t get any better when the seats are folded. With the third-row down, the CX-9 has 38.2 cubic feet. Fold down the second-row and it expands to 71.2 cubic feet. To use the GMC Acadia again, it offers 41.7 cubic feet when the third-row is folded and rises to 79 with both rows. Keep in mind, the Acadia is about six inches shorter than the CX-9. Infotainment All CX-9’s come equipped with the Mazda Connect infotainment system. The base Sport comes with a 7-inch touchscreen, while the Touring and above use a larger 8-inch screen. A rotary knob and set of redundant buttons on the center console control the system. Using Mazda Connect is a bit of a mixed bag. The interface is beginning to look a bit dated with the use of dark colors and a dull screen. Trying to use the touchscreen is an exercise in frustration as it is not easy to tell which parts are touch-enabled and not. On the upside, moving around Mazda Connect is a breeze when using the knob and buttons. Currently, Mazda doesn’t offer Apple CarPlay or Android Auto compatibility. Thankfully, this is being remedied with the 2019 model as Touring models and above will come with both. For the Atlas, Volkswagen offers three different systems. A 6.5-inch touchscreen is standard on the S. Moving up to either the SE, SE w/Technology, or SEL nets you an 8-inch screen. The top line SEL Premium adds navigation to the 8-inch system. All of the systems feature Apple CarPlay and Android Auto compatibility. The current Volkswagen system is one of the easiest to use thanks in part to intuitive menu structure and quick responses. Moving through menus or presets is easy as the system reacts to the swiping gesture like you would do on your smartphone. There are a couple of downsides to the Volkswagen system. One is there is no haptic feedback when pressing the shortcut buttons on either side of the screen. Also, the glass surface becomes littered with fingerprints very quickly. I did have an issue with the system when trying to use Apple CarPlay. At times, applications such as Spotify would freeze up. I could exit out to the CarPlay interface, but was unable to get the apps unfrozen until I shut the vehicle off. After resetting my iPhone, this problem went away. This leaves me wondering how much of this problem was with my phone and not the infotainment system. Powertrain Both of these crossovers are equipped with turbocharged four-cylinder engines. The CX-9 has a 2.5L producing either 227 or 250 (on premium fuel) horsepower and 310 pound-feet of torque. The Atlas has a 2.0L producing 235 horsepower and 258 pound-feet. An optional 3.6L V6 with 276 horsepower is available for the Atlas. For the Mazda, power is routed to a six-speed automatic and the choice of front or all-wheel drive. The Volkswagen makes do with an eight-speed automatic and front-wheel drive only. If you want AWD, you need the V6. Thanks to its higher torque figure, the CX-9 leaves the Atlas in the dust. There is barely any lag coming from the turbo-four. Instead, it delivers a linear throttle response and a steady stream of power. NVH levels are noticeably quieter than the Atlas’ turbo-four. The six-speed automatic delivers seamless shifts and is quick to downshift when you need extra power such as merging. The turbo-four in the Atlas seems slightly overwhelmed at first. When leaving a stop, I found that there was a fair amount of turbo-lag. This is only exacerbated if the stop-start system is turned on. Once the turbo was spooling, the four-cylinder did a surprising job of moving the 4,222 pound Atlas with no issue. Stab the throttle and the engine comes into life, delivering a smooth and constant stream of power. The eight-speed automatic provided quick and smooth shifts, although it was sometimes hesitant to downshift when more power was called for. Fuel Economy Both of these models are close in fuel economy. EPA says the CX-9 AWD should return 20 City/26 Highway/23 Combined, while the Atlas 2.0T will get 22/26/24. During the week, the CX-9 returned 22.5 mpg in mostly city driving and the Atlas got 27.3 mpg with a 60/40 mix of highway and city driving. The eight-speed transmission in the Atlas makes a huge difference. Ride & Handling The CX-9 is clearly the driver’s choice. On a winding road, the crossover feels quite nimble thanks to a well-tuned suspension. There is a slight amount of body roll due to the tall ride height, but nothing that will sway your confidence. Steering has some heft when turning and feels quite responsive. Despite the firm suspension, the CX-9’s ride is supple enough to iron out most bumps. Only large imperfections and bumps would make their way inside. Barely any wind and road noise made it inside the cabin. The Atlas isn’t far behind in handling. Volkswagen’s suspension turning helps keep body roll in check and makes the crossover feel smaller than it actually is. The only weak point is the steering which feels somewhat light when turning. Ride quality is slightly better than the CX-9 as Atlas feels like riding on a magic carpet when driving on bumpy roads. Some of this can be attributed to smaller wheels. There is slightly more wind noise coming inside the cabin. Value It would be unfair to directly compare these two crossovers due to the large gap in price. Instead, I will be comparing them with the other’s similar trim. The 2018 Volkswagen Atlas SE with Technology begins at $35,690 for the 2.0T FWD. With destination, my test car came to $36,615, The Technology adds a lot of desirable features such as three-zone climate control, adaptive cruise control, automatic emergency braking, blind spot monitoring with rear-cross traffic alert, forward collision warning, and lane departure alert. The Mazda CX-9 Touring is slightly less expensive at $35,995 with destination and matches the Atlas on standard features, including all of the safety kit. But we’re giving the Atlas the slight edge as you do get more space for not that much more money. Over at the CX-9, the Grand Touring AWD begins at $42,270. With a couple of options including the Soul Red paint, the as-tested price came to $43,905. The comparable Atlas V6 SEL with 4Motion is only $30 more expensive when you factor in destination. Both come closely matched in terms of equipment with the only differences being the Grand Touring has navigation, while the SEL comes with a panoramic sunroof. This one is a draw as it will come down whether space or luxury is more important to you. Verdict Coming in second is the Mazda CX-9. It may have the sharpest exterior in the class, a premium interior that could embarrass some luxury cars, and pleasing driving characteristics. But ultimately, the CX-9 falls down on the key thing buyers want; space. It trails most everyone in passenger and cargo space. That is ultimately the price you pay for all of the positives listed. For a first attempt, Volkswagen knocked it out of the park with the Atlas. It is a bit sluggish when leaving a stop and doesn’t have as luxurious of an interior as the CX-9. But Volkswagen gave the Atlas one of the largest interiors of the class, a chassis that balances a smooth ride with excellent body control, impressive fuel economy, and a price that won’t break the bank. Both of these crossovers are impressive and worthy of being at the top of the consideration list. But at the end of the day, the Atlas does the three-row crossover better than the CX-9. Disclaimer: Mazda and Volkswagen Provided the Vehicles, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas Year: 2018 Make: Mazda Model: CX-9 Trim: Grand Touring AWD Engine: Turbocharged 2.5L Skyactiv-G Four-Cylinder Driveline: Six-Speed Automatic, All-Wheel Drive Horsepower @ RPM: 227 @ 5,000 (Regular), 250 @ 5,000 (Premium) Torque @ RPM: 310 @ 2,000 rpm Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 20/26/23 Curb Weight: 4,361 lbs Location of Manufacture: Hiroshima, Japan Base Price: $42,470 As Tested Price: $43,905 (Includes $940.00 Destination Charge) Options: Soul Red Metallic - $595.00 Cargo Mat - $100.00 Year: 2018 Make: Volkswagen Model: Atlas Trim: 2.0T SE w/Technology Engine: Turbocharged 2.0L DOHC 16-Valve TSI Four-Cylinder Driveline: Eight-Speed Automatic, Front-Wheel Drive Horsepower @ RPM: 235 @ 4,500 Torque @ RPM: 258 @ 1,600 Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 22/26/24 Curb Weight: 4,222 lbs Location of Manufacture: Chattanooga, TN Base Price: $35,690 As Tested Price: $36,615 (Includes $925.00 Destination Charge) Options: N/A
  8. It seems like ages since Mazda announced plans to bring over a diesel engine. Many things have transpired since then with various delays and the Volkswagen diesel emission scandal. While the company said the diesel engine was still in the cards, we started to think it was as real as bigfoot or the loch ness monster. But the engine is one step closer to reality as the EPA has posted the fuel economy figures for the CX-5 diesel. For the front-wheel variant, the CX-5 diesel will return 28 City/31 Highway/29 Combined. All-wheel drive see a slight drop to 27/30/28. Major improvement over gas model, right? Not really. The FWD gas model does trail the diesel in the city by three, but there is only a one mpg difference in the highway and the combined figure is the same. The AWD gas model is pretty much the same story; three mpg difference in the city, two mpg difference on the highway, and the same figure for combined. It gets even worse if we compare it to the Chevrolet Equinox and GMC Terrain Diesel. In FWD guise, EPA figures stand at 28 City/39 Highway/32 Combined. AWD models return 28/38/32. We're guessing that new emissions equipment and harder testing likely affected CX-5 diesel's fuel economy figure. Mazda might sell the diesel engine as a performance upgrade - the 2.2L turbodiesel produces 170 horsepower and 310 pound-feet of torque. No timeframe has been given on when the CX-5 diesel will finally go on sale. Source: EPA View full article
  9. It seems like ages since Mazda announced plans to bring over a diesel engine. Many things have transpired since then with various delays and the Volkswagen diesel emission scandal. While the company said the diesel engine was still in the cards, we started to think it was as real as bigfoot or the loch ness monster. But the engine is one step closer to reality as the EPA has posted the fuel economy figures for the CX-5 diesel. For the front-wheel variant, the CX-5 diesel will return 28 City/31 Highway/29 Combined. All-wheel drive see a slight drop to 27/30/28. Major improvement over gas model, right? Not really. The FWD gas model does trail the diesel in the city by three, but there is only a one mpg difference in the highway and the combined figure is the same. The AWD gas model is pretty much the same story; three mpg difference in the city, two mpg difference on the highway, and the same figure for combined. It gets even worse if we compare it to the Chevrolet Equinox and GMC Terrain Diesel. In FWD guise, EPA figures stand at 28 City/39 Highway/32 Combined. AWD models return 28/38/32. We're guessing that new emissions equipment and harder testing likely affected CX-5 diesel's fuel economy figure. Mazda might sell the diesel engine as a performance upgrade - the 2.2L turbodiesel produces 170 horsepower and 310 pound-feet of torque. No timeframe has been given on when the CX-5 diesel will finally go on sale. Source: EPA
  10. Mazda Reports June Sales Results Mazda CX-3 Posts Best-Ever Sales IRVINE, Calif. (July 3, 2018) – Mazda North American Operations (MNAO) today reported total June U.S. sales of 26,893 vehicles, representing an increase of 20.4 percent versus June of last year. Year-to-date (YTD) sales through June are up 14.2 percent versus last year, with 163,924 vehicles sold. With 27 selling days in June 2018, versus 26 the year prior, the company posted an increase of 15.9 percent on a Daily Selling Rate (DSR) basis. Key June sales notes: Mazda CX-3 posted top sales, with 2,332 vehicles sold in June, marking an increase of 92.3 percent YOY. This increase was led by the launch of the new 2019 CX-3. Sales of Mazda CX-3 are up 24.8 percent YTD. Mazda CX-5, Mazda’s award-winning crossover SUV, posted its best-ever June sales of 12,710 vehicles, marking an increase of 33.1 percent YOY. Sales of the Mazda CX-5 are up 1 percent YTD. Mazda’s seven-passenger crossover SUV, Mazda CX-9, had a near-record month for June, finishing up 40.1 percent YOY, with 2,381 vehicles sold. Sales of the Mazda CX-9 are up 19.9 percent YTD. Mazda6 posted sales increase of 35.8 percent year-over-year (YOY), with 3,204 vehicles sold in the month of June. Every model in the CX-line posted sales gains in the month of June. Total sales of the CX-line, including the CX-3, CX-5 and CX-9, were up 34.6 percent over June of last year, with 17,423 vehicles sold. Mazda reported 4,604 Certified Pre-Owned (CPO) vehicles sold in June, marking an increase of 18.4 percent YOY.
  11. When we drove the Mazda CX-5 towards the end of last year, we found ourselves wishing that either the long-delayed turbodiesel or possibly the 2.5: turbo-four from the CX-9 would grace the engine. The 2.5L four-cylinder does ok around town, but really struggles when more speed is needed. It seems our wish could be coming true. The Truth About Cars obtained a certification document from the California Air Resources Board for the turbocharged 2.5L four-cylinder. In the document, it lists the 2019 CX-9 and CX-5 offering this engine. It would give the CX-5 a nice power boost as the turbo-four produces 227 horsepower (250 horsepower on premium fuel) and 310 pound-feet of torque. Mazda declined to comment when asked about the document. We're guessing that Mazda could debut the turbo engine in the CX-5 at the LA Auto Show in November. Source: The Truth About Cars View full article
  12. William Maley

    Rumorpile: Turbo Power for the CX-5?

    When we drove the Mazda CX-5 towards the end of last year, we found ourselves wishing that either the long-delayed turbodiesel or possibly the 2.5: turbo-four from the CX-9 would grace the engine. The 2.5L four-cylinder does ok around town, but really struggles when more speed is needed. It seems our wish could be coming true. The Truth About Cars obtained a certification document from the California Air Resources Board for the turbocharged 2.5L four-cylinder. In the document, it lists the 2019 CX-9 and CX-5 offering this engine. It would give the CX-5 a nice power boost as the turbo-four produces 227 horsepower (250 horsepower on premium fuel) and 310 pound-feet of torque. Mazda declined to comment when asked about the document. We're guessing that Mazda could debut the turbo engine in the CX-5 at the LA Auto Show in November. Source: The Truth About Cars
  13. For the past few months, we have been hearing about some key changes to the Mazda MX-5 Miata; more power from the four-cylinder engine, new safety features, and a telescoping steering wheel. Mazda has been using the "can't comment at this time" when asked about these changes. Today, the Japanese automaker finally confirmed the changes. Under the hood lies a reworked 2.0L Skyactiv-G producing 181 horsepower and 151 pound-feet of torque - up 26 and 3 respectively. A higher redline of 7,500 rpm complements the added power. To pull this off, Mazda made a number of changes to the engine which include, Lighter pistons and connecting rods Reconfigured intake ports New fuel injectors New exhaust system Mazda has also fitted a higher final drive ratio (3.583 vs. 3.454), which should make it slightly quicker off the line. There is also more safety tech for the 2019 MX-5 Miata. All models get a backup camera as standard and higher trim levels boast traffic sign recognition and Smart City Brake Support. Other changes for the 2019 MX-5 include, Optional brown canvas soft top Redesigned 17-inch wheels Telescoping steering wheel Mazda hasn't announced pricing on the 2019 MX-5 Miata, but does say it will arrive at dealers later this fall. Source: Mazda View full article
  14. William Maley

    Mazda Finally Spills the Beans on 2019 MX-5 Miata

    For the past few months, we have been hearing about some key changes to the Mazda MX-5 Miata; more power from the four-cylinder engine, new safety features, and a telescoping steering wheel. Mazda has been using the "can't comment at this time" when asked about these changes. Today, the Japanese automaker finally confirmed the changes. Under the hood lies a reworked 2.0L Skyactiv-G producing 181 horsepower and 151 pound-feet of torque - up 26 and 3 respectively. A higher redline of 7,500 rpm complements the added power. To pull this off, Mazda made a number of changes to the engine which include, Lighter pistons and connecting rods Reconfigured intake ports New fuel injectors New exhaust system Mazda has also fitted a higher final drive ratio (3.583 vs. 3.454), which should make it slightly quicker off the line. There is also more safety tech for the 2019 MX-5 Miata. All models get a backup camera as standard and higher trim levels boast traffic sign recognition and Smart City Brake Support. Other changes for the 2019 MX-5 include, Optional brown canvas soft top Redesigned 17-inch wheels Telescoping steering wheel Mazda hasn't announced pricing on the 2019 MX-5 Miata, but does say it will arrive at dealers later this fall. Source: Mazda
  15. The past months has brought some interesting rumors to light on the 2019 Mazda MX-5 Miata. In March, a NHTSA document came to light that revealed the 2019 model would produce 181 horsepower from its 2.0L four-cylinder. A month later, a leaked document from a Canadian Mazda dealer confirmed the horsepower rating, along with some much wanted features such as a telescoping steering wheel. Recently, Japanese outlet Car Watch had the chance to drive the updated 2019 MX-5 Miata for the Japanese market - called the Roadster. In their first drive report, they confirmed a number of details we have reported previously. For starters, the 2.0L has seen power boosted from 155 to 181. The engine has also see its redline increase from 6,800 to 7,500 rpm. This is due to a number of improvements for the engine including lighter pistons and a larger opening for the throttle body. Mazda has also fitted a new dual mass flywheel that will reduce vibrations coming inside, along with a new muffler. Other changes include new color choices for the exterior and interior; Smart City Brake Support, and a telescoping steering wheel. Unsurprisingly, Mazda said that it "can't comment at this time" about if these changes will appear in the U.S. Given the amount of evidence, it would be a safe bet that we'll be seeing most, if not all appear on our MX-5 Miata in the near future. Source: Car Watch, Road & Track View full article
  16. The past months has brought some interesting rumors to light on the 2019 Mazda MX-5 Miata. In March, a NHTSA document came to light that revealed the 2019 model would produce 181 horsepower from its 2.0L four-cylinder. A month later, a leaked document from a Canadian Mazda dealer confirmed the horsepower rating, along with some much wanted features such as a telescoping steering wheel. Recently, Japanese outlet Car Watch had the chance to drive the updated 2019 MX-5 Miata for the Japanese market - called the Roadster. In their first drive report, they confirmed a number of details we have reported previously. For starters, the 2.0L has seen power boosted from 155 to 181. The engine has also see its redline increase from 6,800 to 7,500 rpm. This is due to a number of improvements for the engine including lighter pistons and a larger opening for the throttle body. Mazda has also fitted a new dual mass flywheel that will reduce vibrations coming inside, along with a new muffler. Other changes include new color choices for the exterior and interior; Smart City Brake Support, and a telescoping steering wheel. Unsurprisingly, Mazda said that it "can't comment at this time" about if these changes will appear in the U.S. Given the amount of evidence, it would be a safe bet that we'll be seeing most, if not all appear on our MX-5 Miata in the near future. Source: Car Watch, Road & Track
  17. Mazda Reports May Sales Results Mazda CX-3 Posts Best-Ever Sales Month IRVINE, Calif., June 1, 2018 /PRNewswire/ -- Mazda North American Operations (MNAO) today reported total May U.S. sales of 29,980 vehicles, representing an increase of 15.1 percent versus May of last year. Year-to-date (YTD) sales through May are up 14.9 percent versus last year, with 137,031 vehicles sold. With 26 selling days in May 2018, versus 25 the year prior, the company posted an increase of 10.7 percent on a Daily Selling Rate (DSR) basis. Key May sales notes: Mazda6 led the charge, posting a sales increase of 63.8 percent year-over-year (YOY), with 4,437 vehicles sold in the month of May.This increase was led by the launch of the new 2018 Mazda6, which is now available in more trim options than before, including the introduction of a Signature trim level, which had previously only been available on the CX-9. Mazda CX-5, Mazda's award-winning crossover SUV, returned to record-breaking sales, posting its best-ever May sales of 14,173 vehicles, marking an increase of 19.9 percent YOY. Sales of the Mazda CX-5 are up 43.7 percent YTD. Mazda CX-3 posted its best-ever sales this month, with 1,823 vehicles sold in May, marking an increase of 18.6 percent YOY. Sales of Mazda CX-3 are up 14.0 percent YTD. Mazda's seven-passenger crossover SUV, Mazda CX-9, had a near-record month, finishing up 26.6 percent YOY, with 2,509 vehicles sold. Sales of the Mazda CX-9 are up 18.4 percent YTD. Every model in the CX-line posted sales gains in the month of May. Total sales of the CX-line, including the CX-3, CX-5 and CX-9, where up 20.6 percent over May of last year, with 18,505 vehicles sold.
  18. Remember how Mazda planned on launching the diesel option for the CX-5 in the second half of last year. Nothing came of that and we were left scratching our heads as to why. Was the engine in limbo with the Environmental Protection Agency and California Air Resources Board? Had Mazda decided to throw in the towel? It seems to be the former. Green Car Reports obtained an engine certification document from CARB dated April 13th approving Mazda's diesel engine. Getting this certification in California after the mess that was the Volkswagen diesel emission scandal is quite impressive and will likely make it easier to get through the EPA certification. A Mazda spokeswoman confirmed to Green Car Reports that the diesel still needs to go through EPA certification, and said the company would not speculate when that might happen. Source: Green Car Reports
  19. Remember how Mazda planned on launching the diesel option for the CX-5 in the second half of last year. Nothing came of that and we were left scratching our heads as to why. Was the engine in limbo with the Environmental Protection Agency and California Air Resources Board? Had Mazda decided to throw in the towel? It seems to be the former. Green Car Reports obtained an engine certification document from CARB dated April 13th approving Mazda's diesel engine. Getting this certification in California after the mess that was the Volkswagen diesel emission scandal is quite impressive and will likely make it easier to get through the EPA certification. A Mazda spokeswoman confirmed to Green Car Reports that the diesel still needs to go through EPA certification, and said the company would not speculate when that might happen. Source: Green Car Reports View full article
  20. Last month, we reported in the rumorpile that the 2019 Mazda MX-5 Miata could be packing more power - 181 to be exact. A new report from Road & Track has a couple more details on the engine of the 2019 MX-5 Miata, along with some other tidbits. A leaked document from a Mazda dealer in Canada made its way on to the Miata.net forum (which has been taken down at the time of this writing). According to R&T, the document confirms that the 2019 MX-5 Miata will produce 181 horsepower from a 2.0L four-cylinder. We also learned that torque sees a small bump from 152 to 155 pound-feet. The 2.0L in question will come with a number of new parts including “ultra-light” pistons, lighter connecting rods, intake manifold, throttle body, and high-flow exhaust system. Other details for the 2019 Miata, Will get Mazda's Smart City Braking system and backup camera Finally will have a telescoping steering wheel Source: Road & Track
  21. Last month, we reported in the rumorpile that the 2019 Mazda MX-5 Miata could be packing more power - 181 to be exact. A new report from Road & Track has a couple more details on the engine of the 2019 MX-5 Miata, along with some other tidbits. A leaked document from a Mazda dealer in Canada made its way on to the Miata.net forum (which has been taken down at the time of this writing). According to R&T, the document confirms that the 2019 MX-5 Miata will produce 181 horsepower from a 2.0L four-cylinder. We also learned that torque sees a small bump from 152 to 155 pound-feet. The 2.0L in question will come with a number of new parts including “ultra-light” pistons, lighter connecting rods, intake manifold, throttle body, and high-flow exhaust system. Other details for the 2019 Miata, Will get Mazda's Smart City Braking system and backup camera Finally will have a telescoping steering wheel Source: Road & Track View full article
  22. Mazda Reports Sales Increase of 35.7 Percent in March Mazda CX-5 Posts Best-Ever Sales Month IRVINE, Calif., April 3, 2018 /PRNewswire/ -- Mazda North American Operations (MNAO) today reported total March U.S. sales of 33,302 vehicles, representing an increase of 35.7 percent versus March of last year. Year-to-date (YTD) sales through March are up 21.6 percent versus last year, with 83,995 vehicles sold. Key March sales notes: Mazda's compact crossover SUV, Mazda CX-5, recorded its 12th consecutive record sales month, and its best-ever month since going on sale in February of 2012. In March, sales of the CX-5 rose 90.5 percent year-over-year (YOY), with 16,138 vehicles sold. Sales of the Mazda3 rose 8.7 percent YOY, with 7,760 vehicles sold in the month of March. In line with continued consumer demand, sales of Mazda's subcompact crossover SUV, Mazda CX-3, rose 38.1 percent YOY, with 1,728 vehicles sold in the month of March. The seven-passenger Mazda CX-9 recorded its best March since 2013, with 3,066 vehicles sold. This number represents an increase of 20.2 percent YOY. Total sales of Mazda's CX crossover SUV line, including the CX-3, CX-5 and CX-9, were up 70.6 percent YOY with 20,932 vehicles sold in the month of March. The i-ACTIV All-Wheel Drive option continues to be a favorite among Mazda CX-line buyers, with 59.5 percent of customers choosing the AWD option in March. Mazda reported record-breaking Certified Pre-Owned (CPO) sales of 4,552 vehicles in March, marking an increase of 19.6 percent YOY. Month-To-Date Year-To-Date March March % % MTD March March % % YTD 2018 2017 Change DSR 2018 2017 Change DSR Mazda3 7,760 7,137 8.7% 4.8% 19,655 20,606 (4.6)% (7.1)% Mazda5 - 2 - - - 5 (100.0)% (100.0)% Mazda6 3,734 3,794 (1.6)% (5.1)% 7,532 10,692 (29.6)% (31.4)% MX-5 Miata 876 1,345 (34.9)% (37.2)% 1,966 3,382 (41.9)% (43.4)% CX-3 1,728 1,251 38.1% 33.2% 4,337 3,714 16.8% 13.7% CX-5 16,138 8,470 90.5% 83.7% 42,817 24,374 75.7% 71.1% CX-9 3,066 2,550 20.2% 15.9% 7,688 6,298 22.1% 18.9% Total Vehicles CARS 12,370 12,278 0.7% (2.8)% 29,153 34,685 (15.9)% (18.1)% TRUCKS 20,932 12,271 70.6% 64.5% 54,842 34,386 59.5% 55.3% TOTAL 33,302 24,549 35.7% 30.8% 83,995 69,071 21.6% 18.4% Selling Days 28 27 77 75
  23. There will always be those who want more power in whatever they are driving. Take for example the Mazda MX-5 Miata. Its 2.0L four-cylinder produces 155 horsepower. We found it to be more than enough for driving fun, but there are those who think more power will make it better. It seems their wish could be coming true. Road & Track uncovered a VIN notice sent by Mazda to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) that reveals the 2019 MX-5 Miata will a 2.0L four-cylinder producing 181 horsepower - up 26 from the current model. The question is how Mazda could reach that number. A journalist on Twitter posted a possible clue, saying the engine will feature a reworked head. It is unclear whether or not Mazda is planning on making other changes to the engine to reach 181 horsepower. As Road & Track notes, the most common aftermarket upgrades for the MX-5 (computer, exhaust, and intake) only add around 12 horsepower. A Mazda spokesman said they don't comment on future products when asked. Source: Road & Track View full article
  24. There will always be those who want more power in whatever they are driving. Take for example the Mazda MX-5 Miata. Its 2.0L four-cylinder produces 155 horsepower. We found it to be more than enough for driving fun, but there are those who think more power will make it better. It seems their wish could be coming true. Road & Track uncovered a VIN notice sent by Mazda to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) that reveals the 2019 MX-5 Miata will a 2.0L four-cylinder producing 181 horsepower - up 26 from the current model. The question is how Mazda could reach that number. A journalist on Twitter posted a possible clue, saying the engine will feature a reworked head. It is unclear whether or not Mazda is planning on making other changes to the engine to reach 181 horsepower. As Road & Track notes, the most common aftermarket upgrades for the MX-5 (computer, exhaust, and intake) only add around 12 horsepower. A Mazda spokesman said they don't comment on future products when asked. Source: Road & Track
  25. Mazda Reports Best February in 24 Years Mazda CX-5 Posts 11th Consecutive Record Sales Month IRVINE, Calif. (March 1, 2018) – Mazda North American Operations (MNAO) today reported total February U.S. sales of 25,731 vehicles, representing an increase of 12.7 percent versus February of last year. Year-to-date (YTD) sales through February are up 13.9 percent versus last year, with 50,693 vehicles sold. Key February sales notes: Continued popularity of Mazda's crossover SUVs drove record sales, as Mazda posts its best February since 1994. The Mazda CX-5 continued its record-breaking sales momentum in February, posting its best-ever February and its 11th best-ever month in a row, with 13,216 vehicles sold. This number represents an increase of 68.7 percent versus February of last year. Sales of the seven-passenger Mazda CX-9 rose 6.0 percent year-over-year (YOY) with 2,286 vehicles sold in the month of February. As crossover SUVs continue to dominate the market, sales of Mazda's CX-line remain strong, with CX-3, CX-5 and CX-9 collectively reaching 16,761 vehicles sold in the month of February. This number represents an increase of 48.7 percent YOY, and a year-to-date (YTD) increase of 53.3 percent. Among Mazda CX-line buyers, Mazda's i-ACTIV All-Wheel Drive option continues to be a favorite, with 60.7 percent of customers choosing the AWD option in February. Mazda reported Certified Pre-Owned (CPO) sales of 3,666 vehicles, marking an increase of 6.3 percent YOY, making it Mazda's best February ever for CPO sales. Month-To-Date Year-To-Date February February % % MTD February February % % YTD 2018 2017 Change DSR 2018 2017 Change DSR Mazda3 6,070 6,846 (11.3)% (11.3)% 11,895 13,469 (11.7)% (13.5)% Mazda5 - - - - - 3 (100.0)% (100.0)% Mazda6 2,246 3,598 (37.6)% (37.6)% 3,798 6,898 (44.9)% (46.1)% MX-5 Miata 654 1,108 (41.0)% (41.0)% 1,090 2,037 (46.5)% (47.6)% CX-3 1,259 1,279 (1.6)% (1.6)% 2,609 2,463 5.9% 3.8% CX-5 13,216 7,836 68.7% 68.7% 26,679 15,904 67.8% 64.3% CX-9 2,286 2,157 6.0% 6.0% 4,622 3,748 23.3% 20.8% Total Vehicles CARS 8,970 11,552 (22.4)% (22.4)% 16,783 22,407 (25.1)% (26.6)% TRUCKS 16,761 11,272 48.7% 48.7% 33,910 22,115 53.3% 50.2% TOTAL 25,731 22,824 12.7% 12.7% 50,693 44,522 13.9% 11.5% Selling Days 24 24 49 48

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