Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'SXT'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • News and Views
    • Auto Show Coverage
    • Editorials
    • Industry News
    • Reader Reviews
    • Sales Figure Ticker
    • Staff Reviews
  • Brand Discussion
    • Aston Martin
    • BMW Group
    • Daimler AG
    • Ferrari
    • Fisker
    • Ford Motor Company
    • General Motors
    • Heritage Marques
    • Honda Motor Company
    • Hyundai Motor Group
    • Jaguar-Land Rover
    • Karma
    • Lotus
    • Mazda
    • McLaren Automotive
    • Nissan-Renault Alliance
    • Other Makes
    • Rivian
    • SAAB / NEVS
    • Stellantis
    • Suzuki
    • Tesla
    • Toyota Motor Corporation
    • Volkswagen Automotive Group
    • Volvo
  • Forum Information
    • New Member Check-In
    • Site News & Updates
    • Forum Feedback
    • Newsletters
  • Social Central
    • The Lounge
    • Advertising Archive
    • Auctions and Classifieds
    • Competitions
    • Member Design Showcase
    • Member's Rides Showcase
    • Member Marketplace
    • Merchandise Lookout
    • Motorcycles
    • Random Car Showcase
    • Electronics & Technology
  • Tech Corner
    • Tech Section
    • Product Questions and Reviews
    • Project Car Chronicles
    • Recalls and TSBs
    • Alternative Fuels & Propulsion
    • Powertrain
  • Design Studio

Categories

  • Auto Shows
    • Detroit Auto Show
    • Consumer Electronics Show (CES)
    • Chicago Auto Show
    • New York Auto Show
    • Geneva Auto Show
    • Beijing Auto Show
    • Shanghai Auto Show
    • Paris Motor Show
    • Frankfurt International Motor Show
    • Los Angeles Auto Show
    • SEMA
    • Tokyo Motor Show
  • Opinion
  • News
    • Acura
    • Alfa Romeo
    • Alternative Fuels
    • Aston Martin
    • Audi
    • Automotive Industry
    • Bentley
    • BMW
    • Buick
    • Cadillac
    • Chevrolet
    • Chrysler
    • Dodge
    • Ducati
    • Ferrari
    • Fiat
    • Fisker
    • Ford
    • Genesis
    • GM News
    • GMC
    • Holden
    • Honda
    • Hyundai
    • Infiniti
    • Jaguar
    • Jeep
    • Karma
    • Kia
    • Lamborghini
    • Land Rover
    • Lexus
    • Lincoln
    • Lotus
    • Maserati
    • Mazda
    • McLaren
    • Mercedes Benz
    • MINI
    • Mitsubishi
    • Nissan
    • Opel/Vauxhall
    • Peugeot
    • Polestar
    • Porsche
    • Ram Trucks
    • Rivian
    • Rolls-Royce
    • Saab / NEVS
    • Sales Figures
    • Scion
    • SMART
    • Subaru
    • Tesla
    • Toyota
    • Volkswagen
    • Volvo
    • Zotye
    • Stellantis
  • Reviews
  • Deal Alert

Categories

  • Tires and Wheel Specials
  • Automotive Maintenance Specials

Calendars

There are no results to display.

Product Groups

  • Subscriptions
  • Advertising
  • Vintage Ephemera

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Website URL


Skype


Location


Interests

Found 4 results

  1. Automotive writers like myself suffer from a sickness sometimes called first drive-itus. Essentially first drive-itus is when an automotive has a different opinion on a vehicle than when they first drove it on a first drive event. No one is quite sure how first drive-itus manifests or where it comes from. There is a reason I’m telling you this because I think I had first drive-itus. A couple of years ago, I had the great fortune of heading down to Austin, Texas, to be one of the first people to check out the brand new Dodge Dart. At the time, I came away very impressed and said in my first drive that competitors should be watching their back. But recently, I spent a week with a 2014 Dodge Dart SXT and I came away somewhat disappointed. Read on to see why that is. The Dart in my eyes is still one of the best looking compact models on sale today. While the basic shape seems to mimic a number of compact models, Dodge’s designers took some elements from the larger Charger and Challenger to help make the Dart stand out. Those elements include the crosshair grille up front and long taillight in the back. On the SXT model, you get a set of seventeen-inch alloy wheels which add a nice touch of class to the Dart. Chrysler in general has been really stepping up their game with their interiors, in terms of design and quality. The Dart is an almost perfect example of this. While the interior design doesn’t have quite the same excitement of the exterior, it does feature impressive material and build quality. One feature I’m glad to see as option on this midlevel SXT is the 8.4-inch touchscreen with UConnect. I have praised this system before in previous Chrysler reviews and will do so once again. The system is easy to understand and use, and is very responsive when performing tasks.As for passengers, the front has more than enough space for anyone and the seats provide excellent support. The back seat doesn’t fair as well due to head and legroom being somewhat tight. At least the seats have good support. When I first drove the Dart, there was choice of three different engines; a 2.0L MulitAir four-cylinder, a 1.4L Turbocharged MultiAir four, and a 2.4L MultiAir. Since that time, the 2.0L is only available on the SE model, the 1.4T has been relegated to the Dart Aero model only, and the 2.4L has become the volume engine. The 2.4 makes 184 horsepower and 171 pound-feet of torque. This can either be paired to a six-speed manual or my tester’s six-speed automatic. The 2.4 paired with Fiat’s Multiair tech got the Dart moving in a hurry. Power is available throughout the rev range, so you don’t feel like the vehicle is underpowered. Refinement is very much tops with NVH levels kept a minimum. The six-speed automatic provided very smooth shifts. On the fuel economy front, the EPA rates the Dart 2.4L at 23 City/35 Highway/27 Combined. I saw average of 27 MPG for the week. One of the high praises I gave the Dart when I drove it was how much fun it was to drive. This still holds true. When driving the Dart on some curvy roads, it felt poised with little hint of body roll. Steering was nicely weighted and provided good feedback I as drove along. A lot of this comes down to the CUSW platform the Dart rides on which was derived from the Alfa Romeo Giulietta. However when I was not driving along the back roads, I felt the engineers engineers forgot to make the suspension able to cope with road imperfections and potholes. Driving along Michigan’s ‘amazing’ roads, the Dart felt too stiff and made passengers feel like they were being jostled around. I actually wrote in my notes whether or not the Dart’s suspension was made out of concrete. On the plus side, wind and road noise were kept to minimum levels. When I concluded my first drive report on the Dart, I said that it could make the domestic and import competition a bit nervous. Now after spending a week in the Dart, I’m not sure about that statement. The Dart has a lot good things going for it such as amount technology available, unique design, an impressive engine, and fun to drive characteristics. But when you drive the Dart day to day on the road, the road quality problem rears its head and for many, is a huge turn off. The Dart is almost there, but it needs a bit more finishing work. Disclaimer: Dodge Provided the Dart SXT, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas Year: 2014 Make: Dodge Model: Dart Trim: SXT Engine: 2.4L Inline-Four with Multiair Driveline: Front-Wheel Drive, Six-Speed Automatic Horsepower @ RPM: 184 @ 6,250 Torque @ RPM: 171 @ 4,800 Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 23/35/27 Curb Weight: 3,348 lbs Location of Manufacture: Belvidere, Illinois Base Price: $18,495.00 As Tested Price: $22,025.00 (Includes $995.00 Destination Charge) Options: Six-Speed Powertech Automatic Transmission - $1,250 8.4-inch UConnect Touchscreen Group - $595 UConnect 8.4 FM/AM/NAV - $495 SiriusXM Satellite Radio w/One-Year Subscription - $195 William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.com or you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster. View full article
  2. Back in November, I drove a 2013 Chrysler 300S for a review. After spending a week in it, I came away mightily impressed. So a few weeks after, I spent some quality time with the sister car, the 2014 Dodge Charger. Would I feel the same way as I did in the 300S or I would come away with a different opinion on it? Like the Chrysler 300, designers at Dodge decided to keep the basic shape of the Charger and make small improvements here and there. The front end features a crosshair grille and scalloping along the hood to give the Charger a bit of meanness to it. The front doors have a large groove that begins where door meets the fender. This is a definite callback to the 1968 Charger with its grooves on the doors. The back end features the biggest change to the Charger and that is a new trunk lid with large taillight. This taillight has 164 individual LED lights running the whole length of the light. Aside from the Challenger, this was the first Dodge product to get this and has since expanded to other models in the lineup. Walking around the Charger when it first arrived, I got the feeling that I had detective's or undercover cop's car for a week. This is due to grey paint color and the set of eighteen-inch chrome-clad wheels standard on the SXT.Moving to the inside, Dodge has improved the Charger greatly. A new dashboard design continues the connection to the old Chargers with a unique graphics on the gauge cluster and a nameplate on the passenger side. There are also improved materials and build quality, something the last-generation model couldn't claim. As for space, the 2014 Charger has it in abundance for the front and back seat passengers. The only downside is that you feel somewhat cramped due to a high beltline and a small greenhouse. Comfort is high with very supportive seats in the front and back. My test Charger was equipped with the optional 8.4-inch UConnect infotainment system. This system is possibly the easiest and most lag-free I have used in a vehicle yet. The only downside is the navigation system from Garmin that looks like something you get in a Fisher Price toy. However, I don't mind it since it's easy to use and accurate. For Powertrain and Ride Impressions, See Page 2 The Charger is available with either the 3.6L Pentastar V6 or 5.7L HEMI V8. This model was equipped with the former which packs 292 horsepower and 260 pound-feet of torque. This comes paired with a eight-speed automatic from ZF. Much like the Chrysler 300S I drove earlier in the year, the Charger when equipped with the V6 is sublime. The engine always seems to have more than enough power on tap whenever needed. The 3.6L also is one of the smoothest and quietest V6s I have driven. A lot that credit has to go to the eight-speed automatic transmission which provides quick and smooth downshifts to keep the engine right in the sweet spot. I wish the same could be same for the upshifts. Also, I wished Dodge had used something other than the weird gear lever since it's hard to get it into gear you want the first time around. I'm hoping Dodge goes to a rotary knob or a regular lever for the gear selector in the near future. As for fuel economy, the EPA rates the Charger SXT at 19 City/31 Highway/23 Combined. During the week, I saw an average of 23.2 MPG. On the ride and handling front, the Charger is a refined big sedan. Road imperfections are non-existent thanks to a nicely tuned suspension and long-wheelbase. Wind and noise are kept down. Show it some corners and the Charger is more than capable of tackling them. Compared to the 300S, the Charger SXT has a little bit more body roll since it uses the standard suspension and not the touring suspension on the S. For most buyers, this isn't such a big deal. Steering is excellent with nice weight and very good road feel. When my week concluded with the Charger, I felt the same as the I did with the 300S. Dodge took the Charger and worked on the key areas that needed to be addressed. With those changes, the Charger has become a bonafide competitor in the full-size sedan class and one that deserves a look if you're considering something in the class. Disclaimer: Dodge Provided the Charger SXT, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas Year: 2014 Make: Dodge Model: Charger Trim: SXT Plus Engine: 3.6L DOHC 24-Valve V6 Driveline: Rear-Wheel Drive, Eight-Speed Automatic Horsepower @ RPM: 292 @ 6,350 Torque @ RPM: 260 @ 4,800 Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 19/31/23 Curb Weight: 3,996 lbs Location of Manufacture: Brampton, Ontario Base Price: $29.295.00 As Tested Price: $35,375.00 (Includes $995 Destination Charge) Options: Customer Preferred Package 28J - $2,000.00 Driver Confidence Group - $1,495.00 Navigation/Rear Backup Camera Group - $995.00 Driver Convenience Group - $595.00 William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.comor you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster. View full article
  3. Automotive writers like myself suffer from a sickness sometimes called first drive-itus. Essentially first drive-itus is when an automotive has a different opinion on a vehicle than when they first drove it on a first drive event. No one is quite sure how first drive-itus manifests or where it comes from. There is a reason I’m telling you this because I think I had first drive-itus. A couple of years ago, I had the great fortune of heading down to Austin, Texas, to be one of the first people to check out the brand new Dodge Dart. At the time, I came away very impressed and said in my first drive that competitors should be watching their back. But recently, I spent a week with a 2014 Dodge Dart SXT and I came away somewhat disappointed. Read on to see why that is. The Dart in my eyes is still one of the best looking compact models on sale today. While the basic shape seems to mimic a number of compact models, Dodge’s designers took some elements from the larger Charger and Challenger to help make the Dart stand out. Those elements include the crosshair grille up front and long taillight in the back. On the SXT model, you get a set of seventeen-inch alloy wheels which add a nice touch of class to the Dart. Chrysler in general has been really stepping up their game with their interiors, in terms of design and quality. The Dart is an almost perfect example of this. While the interior design doesn’t have quite the same excitement of the exterior, it does feature impressive material and build quality. One feature I’m glad to see as option on this midlevel SXT is the 8.4-inch touchscreen with UConnect. I have praised this system before in previous Chrysler reviews and will do so once again. The system is easy to understand and use, and is very responsive when performing tasks.As for passengers, the front has more than enough space for anyone and the seats provide excellent support. The back seat doesn’t fair as well due to head and legroom being somewhat tight. At least the seats have good support. When I first drove the Dart, there was choice of three different engines; a 2.0L MulitAir four-cylinder, a 1.4L Turbocharged MultiAir four, and a 2.4L MultiAir. Since that time, the 2.0L is only available on the SE model, the 1.4T has been relegated to the Dart Aero model only, and the 2.4L has become the volume engine. The 2.4 makes 184 horsepower and 171 pound-feet of torque. This can either be paired to a six-speed manual or my tester’s six-speed automatic. The 2.4 paired with Fiat’s Multiair tech got the Dart moving in a hurry. Power is available throughout the rev range, so you don’t feel like the vehicle is underpowered. Refinement is very much tops with NVH levels kept a minimum. The six-speed automatic provided very smooth shifts. On the fuel economy front, the EPA rates the Dart 2.4L at 23 City/35 Highway/27 Combined. I saw average of 27 MPG for the week. One of the high praises I gave the Dart when I drove it was how much fun it was to drive. This still holds true. When driving the Dart on some curvy roads, it felt poised with little hint of body roll. Steering was nicely weighted and provided good feedback I as drove along. A lot of this comes down to the CUSW platform the Dart rides on which was derived from the Alfa Romeo Giulietta. However when I was not driving along the back roads, I felt the engineers engineers forgot to make the suspension able to cope with road imperfections and potholes. Driving along Michigan’s ‘amazing’ roads, the Dart felt too stiff and made passengers feel like they were being jostled around. I actually wrote in my notes whether or not the Dart’s suspension was made out of concrete. On the plus side, wind and road noise were kept to minimum levels. When I concluded my first drive report on the Dart, I said that it could make the domestic and import competition a bit nervous. Now after spending a week in the Dart, I’m not sure about that statement. The Dart has a lot good things going for it such as amount technology available, unique design, an impressive engine, and fun to drive characteristics. But when you drive the Dart day to day on the road, the road quality problem rears its head and for many, is a huge turn off. The Dart is almost there, but it needs a bit more finishing work. Disclaimer: Dodge Provided the Dart SXT, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas Year: 2014 Make: Dodge Model: Dart Trim: SXT Engine: 2.4L Inline-Four with Multiair Driveline: Front-Wheel Drive, Six-Speed Automatic Horsepower @ RPM: 184 @ 6,250 Torque @ RPM: 171 @ 4,800 Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 23/35/27 Curb Weight: 3,348 lbs Location of Manufacture: Belvidere, Illinois Base Price: $18,495.00 As Tested Price: $22,025.00 (Includes $995.00 Destination Charge) Options: Six-Speed Powertech Automatic Transmission - $1,250 8.4-inch UConnect Touchscreen Group - $595 UConnect 8.4 FM/AM/NAV - $495 SiriusXM Satellite Radio w/One-Year Subscription - $195 William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.com or you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster.
  4. Back in November, I drove a 2013 Chrysler 300S for a review. After spending a week in it, I came away mightily impressed. So a few weeks after, I spent some quality time with the sister car, the 2014 Dodge Charger. Would I feel the same way as I did in the 300S or I would come away with a different opinion on it? Like the Chrysler 300, designers at Dodge decided to keep the basic shape of the Charger and make small improvements here and there. The front end features a crosshair grille and scalloping along the hood to give the Charger a bit of meanness to it. The front doors have a large groove that begins where door meets the fender. This is a definite callback to the 1968 Charger with its grooves on the doors. The back end features the biggest change to the Charger and that is a new trunk lid with large taillight. This taillight has 164 individual LED lights running the whole length of the light. Aside from the Challenger, this was the first Dodge product to get this and has since expanded to other models in the lineup. Walking around the Charger when it first arrived, I got the feeling that I had detective's or undercover cop's car for a week. This is due to grey paint color and the set of eighteen-inch chrome-clad wheels standard on the SXT.Moving to the inside, Dodge has improved the Charger greatly. A new dashboard design continues the connection to the old Chargers with a unique graphics on the gauge cluster and a nameplate on the passenger side. There are also improved materials and build quality, something the last-generation model couldn't claim. As for space, the 2014 Charger has it in abundance for the front and back seat passengers. The only downside is that you feel somewhat cramped due to a high beltline and a small greenhouse. Comfort is high with very supportive seats in the front and back. My test Charger was equipped with the optional 8.4-inch UConnect infotainment system. This system is possibly the easiest and most lag-free I have used in a vehicle yet. The only downside is the navigation system from Garmin that looks like something you get in a Fisher Price toy. However, I don't mind it since it's easy to use and accurate. For Powertrain and Ride Impressions, See Page 2 The Charger is available with either the 3.6L Pentastar V6 or 5.7L HEMI V8. This model was equipped with the former which packs 292 horsepower and 260 pound-feet of torque. This comes paired with a eight-speed automatic from ZF. Much like the Chrysler 300S I drove earlier in the year, the Charger when equipped with the V6 is sublime. The engine always seems to have more than enough power on tap whenever needed. The 3.6L also is one of the smoothest and quietest V6s I have driven. A lot that credit has to go to the eight-speed automatic transmission which provides quick and smooth downshifts to keep the engine right in the sweet spot. I wish the same could be same for the upshifts. Also, I wished Dodge had used something other than the weird gear lever since it's hard to get it into gear you want the first time around. I'm hoping Dodge goes to a rotary knob or a regular lever for the gear selector in the near future. As for fuel economy, the EPA rates the Charger SXT at 19 City/31 Highway/23 Combined. During the week, I saw an average of 23.2 MPG. On the ride and handling front, the Charger is a refined big sedan. Road imperfections are non-existent thanks to a nicely tuned suspension and long-wheelbase. Wind and noise are kept down. Show it some corners and the Charger is more than capable of tackling them. Compared to the 300S, the Charger SXT has a little bit more body roll since it uses the standard suspension and not the touring suspension on the S. For most buyers, this isn't such a big deal. Steering is excellent with nice weight and very good road feel. When my week concluded with the Charger, I felt the same as the I did with the 300S. Dodge took the Charger and worked on the key areas that needed to be addressed. With those changes, the Charger has become a bonafide competitor in the full-size sedan class and one that deserves a look if you're considering something in the class. Disclaimer: Dodge Provided the Charger SXT, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas Year: 2014 Make: Dodge Model: Charger Trim: SXT Plus Engine: 3.6L DOHC 24-Valve V6 Driveline: Rear-Wheel Drive, Eight-Speed Automatic Horsepower @ RPM: 292 @ 6,350 Torque @ RPM: 260 @ 4,800 Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 19/31/23 Curb Weight: 3,996 lbs Location of Manufacture: Brampton, Ontario Base Price: $29.295.00 As Tested Price: $35,375.00 (Includes $995 Destination Charge) Options: Customer Preferred Package 28J - $2,000.00 Driver Confidence Group - $1,495.00 Navigation/Rear Backup Camera Group - $995.00 Driver Convenience Group - $595.00 William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.comor you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster.

About us

CheersandGears.com - Founded 2001

We  Cars

Get in touch

Follow us

Recent tweets

facebook

×
×
  • Create New...