Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Takeover'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • News and Views
    • Staff Reviews
    • Reader Reviews
    • Auto Show Coverage
    • Sales Figure Ticker
    • Editorials
    • Competitions
    • Industry News
    • Motorsports
  • Brand Discussion
    • Aston Martin
    • BMW Group
    • Daimler AG
    • Fiat-Chrysler Automobiles
    • Karma
    • Ferrari
    • Ford Motor Company
    • General Motors
    • Honda Motor Company
    • Hyundai Motor Group
    • Jaguar-Land Rover
    • Lotus
    • Mazda
    • McLaren Automotive
    • Nissan-Renault Alliance
    • SAAB / NEVS
    • Subaru
    • Suzuki
    • Tesla
    • Toyota Motor Corporation
    • Chinese Automakers
    • Volkswagen Automotive Group
    • Volvo
    • The British
    • The Italians
    • The French
  • Heritage Marques
    • Pontiac
    • HUMMER
    • Saturn
    • Oldsmobile
    • Mercury
  • Forum Information
    • New Member Check-In
    • Site News & Updates
    • Forum Feedback
    • Newsletters
  • Social Central
    • The Lounge
    • Motorcycles
    • Member Design Showcase
    • Member's Rides Showcase
    • Member Marketplace
    • Auctions and Classifieds
    • Merchandise Lookout
    • Sponsor Forum
    • Electronics & Technology
    • Rated R
  • Tech Corner
    • Tech Section
    • Product Questions and Reviews
    • Project Car Chronicles
    • Recalls and TSBs
    • Alternative Fuels & Propulsion
    • Powertrain
  • Design Studio
  • Cadillac Appreciation Club's Cadillac Discussion
  • European Car Lovers's Topics

Categories

  • Auto Shows
    • Detroit Auto Show
    • Consumer Electronics Show (CES)
    • Chicago Auto Show
    • New York Auto Show
    • Geneva Auto Show
    • Beijing Auto Show
    • Shanghai Auto Show
    • Paris Motor Show
    • Frankfurt International Motor Show
    • Los Angeles Auto Show
    • SEMA
    • Tokyo Motor Show
  • Opinion
  • News
    • Acura
    • Alfa Romeo
    • Alternative Fuels
    • Aston Martin
    • Audi
    • Automotive Industry
    • Bentley
    • BMW
    • Buick
    • Cadillac
    • Chevrolet
    • Chrysler
    • Dodge
    • Ducati
    • Ferrari
    • Fiat
    • Ford
    • Genesis
    • GM News
    • GMC
    • Holden
    • Honda
    • Hyundai
    • Infiniti
    • Jaguar
    • Jeep
    • Karma
    • Kia
    • Lamborghini
    • Land Rover
    • Lexus
    • Lincoln
    • Maserati
    • Mazda
    • McLaren
    • Mercedes Benz
    • MINI
    • Mitsubishi
    • Nissan
    • Opel/Vauxhall
    • Porsche
    • Ram Trucks
    • Rolls-Royce
    • Saab / NEVS
    • Sales Figures
    • Scion
    • SMART
    • Subaru
    • Tesla
    • Toyota
    • Volkswagen
    • Volvo
  • Reviews
  • Deal Alert

Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.


Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Website URL


GooglePlus


Skype


Location


Interests

Found 8 results

  1. Rumors of a possible buyer for Fiat Chrysler Automobiles have popped up again. Late last week, the Asia Times learned from sources that Hyundai Motor Group CEO Chung Mong-koo is waiting for "an expected decline" in shares of FCA before launching a takeover bid attempt. This is expected to launch sometime between the summer and "prior to the Fiat-Chrysler annual shareholders’ meeting in May 2019." Reportedly, FCA CEO Sergio Marchionne drew Hyundai's attention by using interest from Great Wall Motor. The deal is being spurred by Paul Singer, the principal of Elliott Management. Singer made headlines in April by pressuring Hyundai to merge with Mobius, their parts' division to create a new holding company and demanded the company to pay investors more than $10 billion in “excess cash.” Marchionne has been trying his damnedest to try and find a merger partner for the past few years. Tried to work with General Motors CEO Mary Barra about possibly merging the two companies in 2015, but was turned down. Rumors about possibly merging with Volkswagen, but was told no. Various Chinese automakers considered bidding on FCA, but most deny it. Great Wall was considering only purchasing Jeep. However, plans for this were put on ice Here is the question we find ourselves wondering about, why would Hyundai consider buying FCA? Aside from getting their hands on Jeep and Ram Trucks (FCA's money makers), FCA would be gaining the most from this possible deal. To throw another wrench into this, Hyundai is currently in the midsts of a reorganization effort and part of that includes possibly replacing Mong-koo who is 80 years old. Both FCA and Hyundai declined to comment. Source: Asia Times Thanks @regfootball for the news tip View full article
  2. Rumors of a possible buyer for Fiat Chrysler Automobiles have popped up again. Late last week, the Asia Times learned from sources that Hyundai Motor Group CEO Chung Mong-koo is waiting for "an expected decline" in shares of FCA before launching a takeover bid attempt. This is expected to launch sometime between the summer and "prior to the Fiat-Chrysler annual shareholders’ meeting in May 2019." Reportedly, FCA CEO Sergio Marchionne drew Hyundai's attention by using interest from Great Wall Motor. The deal is being spurred by Paul Singer, the principal of Elliott Management. Singer made headlines in April by pressuring Hyundai to merge with Mobius, their parts' division to create a new holding company and demanded the company to pay investors more than $10 billion in “excess cash.” Marchionne has been trying his damnedest to try and find a merger partner for the past few years. Tried to work with General Motors CEO Mary Barra about possibly merging the two companies in 2015, but was turned down. Rumors about possibly merging with Volkswagen, but was told no. Various Chinese automakers considered bidding on FCA, but most deny it. Great Wall was considering only purchasing Jeep. However, plans for this were put on ice Here is the question we find ourselves wondering about, why would Hyundai consider buying FCA? Aside from getting their hands on Jeep and Ram Trucks (FCA's money makers), FCA would be gaining the most from this possible deal. To throw another wrench into this, Hyundai is currently in the midsts of a reorganization effort and part of that includes possibly replacing Mong-koo who is 80 years old. Both FCA and Hyundai declined to comment. Source: Asia Times Thanks @regfootball for the news tip
  3. Geely Automotive's chairman Li Shufu made headlines last week by dropping $9 billion for 9.69% stake in Daimler AG, making him the biggest shareholder in Mercedes-Benz's parent company. This follows a trend by Geely in buying automakers (Volvo in 2010, a 51 percent stake in Lotus last year). But a new report from Bloomberg reveals Shufu had his eye on a possible bigger prize. Last year, Shufu approached Fiat Chrysler Automobiles about "a potential takeover". According to people familiar with the matter, Geely and FCA held informal talks. Nothing would come to fruition however as the two disagreed on how much FCA would be worth after the completion of the current five-year plan - expected to end this year. At the time of Bloomberg's report, FCA had a market cap value of 27 billion euros (about $33 billion). FCA and Geely declined to comment on Bloomberg's report. Back in August, Automotive News broke the news that various Chinese automakers were interested in possibly acquiring FCA. In fact, one unnamed automaker submitted a bid, but was rejected by FCA for being to low. At the time, Automotive News didn't mention the automaker in question, but Bloomberg's report possibly puts Geely as the one. Later that month, Chinese automaker Great Wall said they were interested in purchasing Jeep, although plans for this would fall apart. Source: Bloomberg View full article
  4. Geely Automotive's chairman Li Shufu made headlines last week by dropping $9 billion for 9.69% stake in Daimler AG, making him the biggest shareholder in Mercedes-Benz's parent company. This follows a trend by Geely in buying automakers (Volvo in 2010, a 51 percent stake in Lotus last year). But a new report from Bloomberg reveals Shufu had his eye on a possible bigger prize. Last year, Shufu approached Fiat Chrysler Automobiles about "a potential takeover". According to people familiar with the matter, Geely and FCA held informal talks. Nothing would come to fruition however as the two disagreed on how much FCA would be worth after the completion of the current five-year plan - expected to end this year. At the time of Bloomberg's report, FCA had a market cap value of 27 billion euros (about $33 billion). FCA and Geely declined to comment on Bloomberg's report. Back in August, Automotive News broke the news that various Chinese automakers were interested in possibly acquiring FCA. In fact, one unnamed automaker submitted a bid, but was rejected by FCA for being to low. At the time, Automotive News didn't mention the automaker in question, but Bloomberg's report possibly puts Geely as the one. Later that month, Chinese automaker Great Wall said they were interested in purchasing Jeep, although plans for this would fall apart. Source: Bloomberg
  5. Update: In a statement to Mashable, a McLaren spokesperson said "We can confirm McLaren is not in discussion with Apple in respect of any potential investment," So those hoping for an Apple 570S or something else, we're going to be bursting that bubble now. Update 2: Tim Bradshaw, one of the reporters behind the Apple/McLaren story has gone on Twitter saying the FT stands behind its original report. Apple has eyes set on acquiring the McLaren Technology Group - the folks who brought us the F1 supercar and more recently the 570S. The Financial Times reports that Apple and McLaren have been in talks for the past few months about either a full takeover or strategic investment. Why is Apple interested in McLaren? The FT says Apple is interested in McLaren's technology and knowledge of using light-weight materials such as carbon fiber and aluminum. The deal if it goes through is likely to be valued between $1.3 billion and $1.95 billion. For the past few years, rumors have been swirling around of Apple building their own self-driving electric vehicle. Apple brought in engineers from various automotive companies such as Diamler and Tesla, and began work on Project Titan two years ago. But the New York Times reports that Apple has hit a few snags in this project and has decided to reset the project. Dozens of employees were laid-off and parts of the project were shuttered. The report goes on to say the Apple is now focusing on building the underlying technology for an autonomous vehicle. Sources tell the FT that the deal might not go through because of the change in strategy. Apple declined to comment when asked by Roadshow. McLaren hasn't issued a comment at this time. See Update. Source: Financial Times (Subscription Required), Bloomberg, New York Times, Roadshow
  6. Update: In a statement to Mashable, a McLaren spokesperson said "We can confirm McLaren is not in discussion with Apple in respect of any potential investment," So those hoping for an Apple 570S or something else, we're going to be bursting that bubble now. Update 2: Tim Bradshaw, one of the reporters behind the Apple/McLaren story has gone on Twitter saying the FT stands behind its original report. Apple has eyes set on acquiring the McLaren Technology Group - the folks who brought us the F1 supercar and more recently the 570S. The Financial Times reports that Apple and McLaren have been in talks for the past few months about either a full takeover or strategic investment. Why is Apple interested in McLaren? The FT says Apple is interested in McLaren's technology and knowledge of using light-weight materials such as carbon fiber and aluminum. The deal if it goes through is likely to be valued between $1.3 billion and $1.95 billion. For the past few years, rumors have been swirling around of Apple building their own self-driving electric vehicle. Apple brought in engineers from various automotive companies such as Diamler and Tesla, and began work on Project Titan two years ago. But the New York Times reports that Apple has hit a few snags in this project and has decided to reset the project. Dozens of employees were laid-off and parts of the project were shuttered. The report goes on to say the Apple is now focusing on building the underlying technology for an autonomous vehicle. Sources tell the FT that the deal might not go through because of the change in strategy. Apple declined to comment when asked by Roadshow. McLaren hasn't issued a comment at this time. See Update. Source: Financial Times (Subscription Required), Bloomberg, New York Times, Roadshow View full article
  7. Back in December, we reported on the ambitious plan of Guido Dumarey, owner of the Punch International to buy General Motors' Elizabeth plant and the assets to the Commodore to build out a new range of rear and all-wheel drive vehicles in Australia. “Everything is planned. The next step is to inform all the parties with the right plan, and it happens next year. The announcement is that they will close in the end of 2017. In the first six months of next year we must work very hard to find solutions. Two thousand and sixteen is the key year. After ’16 we must not think about it, because all the programs have started to stop and it’s too late,” Dumarey told Motoring back in December. That ambitious plan has come to a halt. CarAdvice reports that General Motors and Punch International released a joint statement today stating that deal to keep producing vehicles at Elizabeth was “not possible in this case". The reasons are the same as to why Ford, GM, and Toyota are ending production in Australia; a lack of scale, high production costs, and a contraction in the supply base. Details of the plan and discussions cannot be discussed by either party due to a non-disclosure agreement. The joint statement is below. General Motors and Punch Corporation have undertaken and completed a detailed global evaluation of a proposal from Punch Corporation to continue manufacturing vehicles at Holden’s Elizabeth plant in South Australia. Both parties concluded that a viable business model was not possible for this case. Therefore the proposal will not be taken forward. GM and Punch have communicated on this decision. As discussions have been governed by a Non-Disclosure Agreement, neither party involved is able to discuss details of the proposal, nor the assessment. The challenges to domestic automotive manufacturing in Australia – lack of scale, high production costs, supply base contraction and increasing market fragmentation – persist and cannot be overcome for this business case. In particular, the wind down of the supply base following the manufacturing exit of the three existing car makers, and the critical production mass they represent, is insurmountable. GM thanks Punch Corporation for their proposal. GM will continue to consider Punch Corporation, along with other interested parties, to participate in the sale process of the Elizabeth plant and assets after GM ceases local manufacturing. Punch Corporation will continue to pursue other business opportunities in the Australian automotive sector. Source: CarAdvice View full article
  8. Back in December, we reported on the ambitious plan of Guido Dumarey, owner of the Punch International to buy General Motors' Elizabeth plant and the assets to the Commodore to build out a new range of rear and all-wheel drive vehicles in Australia. “Everything is planned. The next step is to inform all the parties with the right plan, and it happens next year. The announcement is that they will close in the end of 2017. In the first six months of next year we must work very hard to find solutions. Two thousand and sixteen is the key year. After ’16 we must not think about it, because all the programs have started to stop and it’s too late,” Dumarey told Motoring back in December. That ambitious plan has come to a halt. CarAdvice reports that General Motors and Punch International released a joint statement today stating that deal to keep producing vehicles at Elizabeth was “not possible in this case". The reasons are the same as to why Ford, GM, and Toyota are ending production in Australia; a lack of scale, high production costs, and a contraction in the supply base. Details of the plan and discussions cannot be discussed by either party due to a non-disclosure agreement. The joint statement is below. General Motors and Punch Corporation have undertaken and completed a detailed global evaluation of a proposal from Punch Corporation to continue manufacturing vehicles at Holden’s Elizabeth plant in South Australia. Both parties concluded that a viable business model was not possible for this case. Therefore the proposal will not be taken forward. GM and Punch have communicated on this decision. As discussions have been governed by a Non-Disclosure Agreement, neither party involved is able to discuss details of the proposal, nor the assessment. The challenges to domestic automotive manufacturing in Australia – lack of scale, high production costs, supply base contraction and increasing market fragmentation – persist and cannot be overcome for this business case. In particular, the wind down of the supply base following the manufacturing exit of the three existing car makers, and the critical production mass they represent, is insurmountable. GM thanks Punch Corporation for their proposal. GM will continue to consider Punch Corporation, along with other interested parties, to participate in the sale process of the Elizabeth plant and assets after GM ceases local manufacturing. Punch Corporation will continue to pursue other business opportunities in the Australian automotive sector. Source: CarAdvice

About us

CheersandGears.com - Founded 2001

We ♥ Cars

Get in touch

Follow us

Recent tweets

facebook

×