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Found 18 results

  1. General Motors has extended the plant shutdown at their Lordstown, Ohio plant by 'several weeks' as a way to help cut back on the inventory of the Chevrolet Cruzes. According to The Detroit News, workers at the plant were notified of the extension this morning. GM did not say how long the extension would be. Robert Morales, president of UAW Local 1714 said the union doesn't have any information on how long the shutdown will last. GM has been trying to reduce the amount of Cruzes sitting around. Back in November, GM cut a shift at the plant which affected 1,243 workers. The good news is that Cruze inventory has dropped from a 121-day supply that we reported in December to around a 100-day supply. Cruze sales in January increased 38.9 percent to 19,949 units. Source: The Detroit News Pic Credit: William Maley for Cheers & Gears
  2. As sales of compacts and sport cars begin declining, automakers are faced with tough decisions as to what in terms of production and workers. General Motors made the difficult decision to lay off 2,000 workers at two plants. Bloomberg reports that GM will be cutting the third shift at their Lansing Grand River plant in Michigan (home to Cadillac ATS, CTS, and Chevrolet Camaro) and a shift at Lordstown, Ohio plant (home to the Chevrolet Cruze). GM spokesman Tom Wickham said the company is treating the layoffs as permanent, although some workers will be able to transfer to other plants. The layoffs are due to sales of compact and sports cars going down due to consumers buying more crossovers. Sales of the Chevrolet Cruze dropped 20 percent through October, while the Camaro has seen a drop of 9 percent. On the same day, General Motors announced a $900 million investment for three plants - Toledo Transmission Operations, Bedford Casting Operations in Indiana, and Lansing Grand River. Wickham said this investment would not add any new jobs. Source: Bloomberg, General Motors Press Release is on Page 2 General Motors today announced initiatives to strengthen and align its production output at key U.S. manufacturing operations. The plans include investing more than $900 million in three facilities — Toledo Transmission Operations in Ohio, Lansing Grand River in Michigan and Bedford Casting Operations in Indiana — to prepare the facilities for future product programs. GM also announced plans to align production output with demand for cars built at the Lordstown, Ohio, and Lansing Grand River, Michigan, assembly plants. As the customer shift from cars to crossovers and trucks is projected to continue, GM will suspend the third shift of production at both facilities in the first quarter of 2017.
  3. When General Motors announced that it would be potentially selling its Lordstown plant to electric car start-up Workhorse Group Inc, there was a fair amount of head-scratching. The company is best for their W-15 range-extended pickup (which has been delayed) and electric vans. They are also known for the Surefly octocopter drone their former CEO Steve Burns is trying to sell. Why the skepticism? Workhorse isn't looking so good on the financial sheets. Back in March, Trucks.com published a report talking about the various financial setbacks the company has been facing. From their story, The news hasn't gotten any better in 2019. Their most recent financial statement to the SEC reveals the company has $2,847,936 of on-hand cash at the end of March. They also reported a net loss of $6,264,172. "Workhorse appears to be a very slow-moving venture that has a lot of risk, and no massive amount of funding. Lordstown is a massive facility, and despite some investments over the years, I don't believe it would be easily converted to build electric pickups without substantial investment," said Jeff Schuster, an industry analyst for LMC Automotive to The Detroit News. But Workhorse has a plan for this. Both the News and Trucks.com report that “newly formed entity” would be created and Workhorse would be a minority stakeholder. The entity "would own Lordstown and use Workhorse technology and intellectual property to build a vehicle." Where would the business get the capital to this is unclear. Workhorse spokesman Tom Colton declined to comment when asked about possible funding sources. “There’s got to be some big contract behind this because Workhorse’s financials and forecasts just don’t merit a plant that makes 450,000 units a year,” said Kristin Dziczek, director of the labor and industry group for the Center for Automotive Research. There is also the issue of utilizing all of that space that Lordstown offers - 6.2 million square feet. Analysis done by LMC says Workhorse would need to produce 410,000 trucks and vans per year to reach full capacity. At the moment, LMC forecasts Workhorse producing between 5,000 to 10,000 vehicles. Again, Workhorse may have a solution. Here is GM Spokesman Jim Cain speaking to The Detroit News, As mentioned earlier, Workhorse is one of the five finalists on building new trucks for the U.S. Postal Service. They are teamed up with VT Hackney - a company that builds specialized bodies for work trucks - Emergency services and Beverage trucks to give some examples. The contract is worth $6.3 billion. But Jalopnik reported yesterday that the post office truck would not be built in Lordstown. As it stands, there are a lot of questions and unknowns about this possible deal. Source: The Detroit News, Trucks.com
  4. In a series of tweets today, Trump announced that General Motors will be selling their Lordstown plant to electric truck maker Workhorse. Lordstown was shut down in March of this year and formerly built the Chevrolet Cruze. The details of the plant sale have not yet been announced. Workhorse is a Cincinnati based company who builds EV pickups with a built in range extender, similar in concept to the Chevrolet Volt. Workhorse's sole model is the W-15, capable of driving up to 80 miles on a charge before a gasoline powered range extender kicks in. It uses two motors to provide all-wheel drive. The only configuration available is an extended cab with 6.5 foot bed. They can tow up to 5,000 lbs and have a payload of 2,200 lbs. Pricing starts at $54,500 before tax credits. Workhorse intends to start production for the retail market sometime in 2019. Fleet orders have already started. GM is not denying any of the information in the tweets from Trump. Update: General Motors has confirmed that talks are ongoing.
  5. Trump posted multiple tweets regarding the closure of GM's Lordstown Ohio plant today. In those tweets he says he has spoken to GM CEO Mary Barra about his displeasure over the closing of the facility. He said he demanded swift action on either the selling of the plant or reopening it. He further stated the Ms. Barra blamed the UAW for the closure. In a further series of tweets, Trump mentioned that GM and the UAW will be starting talks in September of this year, but that he is impatient with that timeline. Claiming that we have one of the best economies in history, he wants to see the plant opened or sold to another car company. While Lordstown has shuttered on reality, on paper it still needs to negotiate its closure with the UAW during contract negotiations later this year. In a report last week, it appears that General Motors has something in the works for the Lordstown plant that Governor DeWine said could be a possible sale of Lordstown. Some have pondered why Trump is focusing on the Lordstown facility out of all 5 GM plant closures and the answer seems to be in Ohio's status as a presidential election swing state. UAW 1112 President David Green has sent multiple letters to Trump asking for his assistance to help save the facility, but at last report has not heard back from the administration.
  6. After announcing the closure of 5 plants back in November, General Motors ended production of the Chevrolet Cruze at the Lordstown Ohio assembly plant last week. Now, Ohio Governor Mike DeWine has said that in his discussions with General Motors, that the company has plans to make an announcement in about 4 to 6 weeks. DeWine said that it is his understanding that GM is looking to sell the plant, but that he doesn't know who GM is talking to. While he reiterated his uncertainty, he said The governor stated he or his office is in contact with GM at least twice a week.
  7. GM's Lordstown facility has been sold to startup Lordstown Motors. Lordstown Motors will produce the Workhorse Endurance pickup truck, an all-electric truck, at the site. The Endurance has all-wheel drive via 4 motors, one for each wheel. It also has outlets to allow for the use of power tools. Workhorse is also in the bidding to make plug-in mail trucks for the U.S. Postal Service. Workhorse has 6,000 orders for a truck based on the W-15 Prototype, and those orders would be moved to Lordstown for production. Workhorse is targeting fleet buyers. With fewer moving parts and lower fuel costs, it could translate to lower cost-to-own for fleet operators. Lordstown Motors still needs to go through several more rounds of fund raising in order to continue development, conduct safety testing, and retool the plant for production.
  8. Lordstown Motors, the outfit affiliated with the hybrid truck manufacturer Workhorse is still aiming to buy the Lordstown assembly facility from General Motors. They have been in talks with GM since the summer and are aiming to build their headquarters in Lordstown because of the availability of the workforce. It would not just include manufacturing, but sales, human resources, and engineering positions would be there too. The plant would be a hub for electric vehicle manufacturing. They want to design and supply EV components not just to GM, but to many manufacturers. Wiring harnesses, electric motors, and other components would all be manufactured at the plant alongside the trucks they intend to build. Along with the workers, LM says that the existing GM supply chain is an advantage as well. Hyperion, a company preparing hydrogen fuel cell vehicles, has signed on as a partner. They are preparing their prototypes and will likely be shown to the public sometime next year. One hiccup now is the talks between the UAW and General Motors. As part of the deal in the works, GM would re-open Lordstown as a battery plant. If that happens, Lordstown Motors would need to find another local facility to locate themselves.
  9. Back in early May, we reported that electric truck maker Workhorse was in talks with General Motors to buy the shuttered Lordstown Assembly plant that formerly built the Chevrolet Cruze. The plan seemed founded more on hopes and dreams rather than actual financial reality. Workhorse's only model, the W-15 is a truck with an 80 mile range and a built in range extender, has not exactly been climbing the sales charts. In fact, the company booked only $6,000 in sales in the 2nd quarter of 2019, roughly $70 per day. Following that report, the company's stock plunged 35%. Deliveries of the truck are currently on hold and will resume in the 4th quarter this year. There is currently a $70 Million backlog of orders to fill. Hopes of a solution for Lordstown coming from Workhorse are dim, but there is one thing that could save the deal: a $6.3 Billion contract from the US Postal Service to build the next generation of mail trucks, though Tom Colton, a spokesman for Workhorse said that the Lordstown deal isn't contingent on the contract from the USPS. Under the proposed Lordstown deal, a new company would be formed called Lordstown Motors Corp. which would license the Workhorse technology to produce vehicles based on the W-15 model. Workhorse itself would own a minority stake in the company. The UAW is still in talks with General Motors to reopen the plant and assign new product to it.
  10. General Motors has extended the plant shutdown at their Lordstown, Ohio plant by 'several weeks' as a way to help cut back on the inventory of the Chevrolet Cruzes. According to The Detroit News, workers at the plant were notified of the extension this morning. GM did not say how long the extension would be. Robert Morales, president of UAW Local 1714 said the union doesn't have any information on how long the shutdown will last. GM has been trying to reduce the amount of Cruzes sitting around. Back in November, GM cut a shift at the plant which affected 1,243 workers. The good news is that Cruze inventory has dropped from a 121-day supply that we reported in December to around a 100-day supply. Cruze sales in January increased 38.9 percent to 19,949 units. Source: The Detroit News Pic Credit: William Maley for Cheers & Gears View full article
  11. As sales of compacts and sport cars begin declining, automakers are faced with tough decisions as to what in terms of production and workers. General Motors made the difficult decision to lay off 2,000 workers at two plants. Bloomberg reports that GM will be cutting the third shift at their Lansing Grand River plant in Michigan (home to Cadillac ATS, CTS, and Chevrolet Camaro) and a shift at Lordstown, Ohio plant (home to the Chevrolet Cruze). GM spokesman Tom Wickham said the company is treating the layoffs as permanent, although some workers will be able to transfer to other plants. The layoffs are due to sales of compact and sports cars going down due to consumers buying more crossovers. Sales of the Chevrolet Cruze dropped 20 percent through October, while the Camaro has seen a drop of 9 percent. On the same day, General Motors announced a $900 million investment for three plants - Toledo Transmission Operations, Bedford Casting Operations in Indiana, and Lansing Grand River. Wickham said this investment would not add any new jobs. Source: Bloomberg, General Motors Press Release is on Page 2 General Motors today announced initiatives to strengthen and align its production output at key U.S. manufacturing operations. The plans include investing more than $900 million in three facilities — Toledo Transmission Operations in Ohio, Lansing Grand River in Michigan and Bedford Casting Operations in Indiana — to prepare the facilities for future product programs. GM also announced plans to align production output with demand for cars built at the Lordstown, Ohio, and Lansing Grand River, Michigan, assembly plants. As the customer shift from cars to crossovers and trucks is projected to continue, GM will suspend the third shift of production at both facilities in the first quarter of 2017. View full article
  12. GM's Lordstown facility has been sold to startup Lordstown Motors. Lordstown Motors will produce the Workhorse Endurance pickup truck, an all-electric truck, at the site. The Endurance has all-wheel drive via 4 motors, one for each wheel. It also has outlets to allow for the use of power tools. Workhorse is also in the bidding to make plug-in mail trucks for the U.S. Postal Service. Workhorse has 6,000 orders for a truck based on the W-15 Prototype, and those orders would be moved to Lordstown for production. Workhorse is targeting fleet buyers. With fewer moving parts and lower fuel costs, it could translate to lower cost-to-own for fleet operators. Lordstown Motors still needs to go through several more rounds of fund raising in order to continue development, conduct safety testing, and retool the plant for production. View full article
  13. Lordstown Motors, the outfit affiliated with the hybrid truck manufacturer Workhorse is still aiming to buy the Lordstown assembly facility from General Motors. They have been in talks with GM since the summer and are aiming to build their headquarters in Lordstown because of the availability of the workforce. It would not just include manufacturing, but sales, human resources, and engineering positions would be there too. The plant would be a hub for electric vehicle manufacturing. They want to design and supply EV components not just to GM, but to many manufacturers. Wiring harnesses, electric motors, and other components would all be manufactured at the plant alongside the trucks they intend to build. Along with the workers, LM says that the existing GM supply chain is an advantage as well. Hyperion, a company preparing hydrogen fuel cell vehicles, has signed on as a partner. They are preparing their prototypes and will likely be shown to the public sometime next year. One hiccup now is the talks between the UAW and General Motors. As part of the deal in the works, GM would re-open Lordstown as a battery plant. If that happens, Lordstown Motors would need to find another local facility to locate themselves. View full article
  14. Back in early May, we reported that electric truck maker Workhorse was in talks with General Motors to buy the shuttered Lordstown Assembly plant that formerly built the Chevrolet Cruze. The plan seemed founded more on hopes and dreams rather than actual financial reality. Workhorse's only model, the W-15 is a truck with an 80 mile range and a built in range extender, has not exactly been climbing the sales charts. In fact, the company booked only $6,000 in sales in the 2nd quarter of 2019, roughly $70 per day. Following that report, the company's stock plunged 35%. Deliveries of the truck are currently on hold and will resume in the 4th quarter this year. There is currently a $70 Million backlog of orders to fill. Hopes of a solution for Lordstown coming from Workhorse are dim, but there is one thing that could save the deal: a $6.3 Billion contract from the US Postal Service to build the next generation of mail trucks, though Tom Colton, a spokesman for Workhorse said that the Lordstown deal isn't contingent on the contract from the USPS. Under the proposed Lordstown deal, a new company would be formed called Lordstown Motors Corp. which would license the Workhorse technology to produce vehicles based on the W-15 model. Workhorse itself would own a minority stake in the company. The UAW is still in talks with General Motors to reopen the plant and assign new product to it. View full article
  15. When General Motors announced that it would be potentially selling its Lordstown plant to electric car start-up Workhorse Group Inc, there was a fair amount of head-scratching. The company is best for their W-15 range-extended pickup (which has been delayed) and electric vans. They are also known for the Surefly octocopter drone their former CEO Steve Burns is trying to sell. Why the skepticism? Workhorse isn't looking so good on the financial sheets. Back in March, Trucks.com published a report talking about the various financial setbacks the company has been facing. From their story, The news hasn't gotten any better in 2019. Their most recent financial statement to the SEC reveals the company has $2,847,936 of on-hand cash at the end of March. They also reported a net loss of $6,264,172. "Workhorse appears to be a very slow-moving venture that has a lot of risk, and no massive amount of funding. Lordstown is a massive facility, and despite some investments over the years, I don't believe it would be easily converted to build electric pickups without substantial investment," said Jeff Schuster, an industry analyst for LMC Automotive to The Detroit News. But Workhorse has a plan for this. Both the News and Trucks.com report that “newly formed entity” would be created and Workhorse would be a minority stakeholder. The entity "would own Lordstown and use Workhorse technology and intellectual property to build a vehicle." Where would the business get the capital to this is unclear. Workhorse spokesman Tom Colton declined to comment when asked about possible funding sources. “There’s got to be some big contract behind this because Workhorse’s financials and forecasts just don’t merit a plant that makes 450,000 units a year,” said Kristin Dziczek, director of the labor and industry group for the Center for Automotive Research. There is also the issue of utilizing all of that space that Lordstown offers - 6.2 million square feet. Analysis done by LMC says Workhorse would need to produce 410,000 trucks and vans per year to reach full capacity. At the moment, LMC forecasts Workhorse producing between 5,000 to 10,000 vehicles. Again, Workhorse may have a solution. Here is GM Spokesman Jim Cain speaking to The Detroit News, As mentioned earlier, Workhorse is one of the five finalists on building new trucks for the U.S. Postal Service. They are teamed up with VT Hackney - a company that builds specialized bodies for work trucks - Emergency services and Beverage trucks to give some examples. The contract is worth $6.3 billion. But Jalopnik reported yesterday that the post office truck would not be built in Lordstown. As it stands, there are a lot of questions and unknowns about this possible deal. Source: The Detroit News, Trucks.com View full article
  16. In a series of tweets today, Trump announced that General Motors will be selling their Lordstown plant to electric truck maker Workhorse. Lordstown was shut down in March of this year and formerly built the Chevrolet Cruze. The details of the plant sale have not yet been announced. Workhorse is a Cincinnati based company who builds EV pickups with a built in range extender, similar in concept to the Chevrolet Volt. Workhorse's sole model is the W-15, capable of driving up to 80 miles on a charge before a gasoline powered range extender kicks in. It uses two motors to provide all-wheel drive. The only configuration available is an extended cab with 6.5 foot bed. They can tow up to 5,000 lbs and have a payload of 2,200 lbs. Pricing starts at $54,500 before tax credits. Workhorse intends to start production for the retail market sometime in 2019. Fleet orders have already started. GM is not denying any of the information in the tweets from Trump. Update: General Motors has confirmed that talks are ongoing. View full article
  17. Trump posted multiple tweets regarding the closure of GM's Lordstown Ohio plant today. In those tweets he says he has spoken to GM CEO Mary Barra about his displeasure over the closing of the facility. He said he demanded swift action on either the selling of the plant or reopening it. He further stated the Ms. Barra blamed the UAW for the closure. In a further series of tweets, Trump mentioned that GM and the UAW will be starting talks in September of this year, but that he is impatient with that timeline. Claiming that we have one of the best economies in history, he wants to see the plant opened or sold to another car company. While Lordstown has shuttered on reality, on paper it still needs to negotiate its closure with the UAW during contract negotiations later this year. In a report last week, it appears that General Motors has something in the works for the Lordstown plant that Governor DeWine said could be a possible sale of Lordstown. Some have pondered why Trump is focusing on the Lordstown facility out of all 5 GM plant closures and the answer seems to be in Ohio's status as a presidential election swing state. UAW 1112 President David Green has sent multiple letters to Trump asking for his assistance to help save the facility, but at last report has not heard back from the administration. View full article
  18. After announcing the closure of 5 plants back in November, General Motors ended production of the Chevrolet Cruze at the Lordstown Ohio assembly plant last week. Now, Ohio Governor Mike DeWine has said that in his discussions with General Motors, that the company has plans to make an announcement in about 4 to 6 weeks. DeWine said that it is his understanding that GM is looking to sell the plant, but that he doesn't know who GM is talking to. While he reiterated his uncertainty, he said The governor stated he or his office is in contact with GM at least twice a week. View full article

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