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Found 4 results

  1. It came as a shock to many when Volkswagen admitted that it used illegal software to cheat emission tests with their diesel. But there was one group that wasn't surprised, automakers. Kent Falck, a future product specialist at Volvo said a recent event that many automakers were very suspicious of Volkswagen's emission results with their TDI engines. Falck explained that many were puzzled as to how Volkswagen was able to achieve lower emissions despite using the same suppliers as other automakers. “We have the same suppliers, we have Bosch, we have Denso, we are working with the same partners, so we know this technology doesn’t exist,” said Falck. “I have known that for seven years.” “We sat in a room and reviewed all the facts, figures, whatever we have, with the specialists. (But) we can’t manage it, how are the others doing it? We don’t know.” At first, Falck thought Volkswagen had some sort of proprietary technology to pull this off without resorting to such technologies such urea injection. “There is always intellectual properties in the world ... there might be something out there in the technology ... that we are not allowed to buy because it’s owned by a supplier. We were wondering how (VW met strict US emissions targets) that’s for sure.” But soon enough, Falck and other people at various automakers realized Volkswagen was going at it an illegal way. Source: News.com.au View full article
  2. It came as a shock to many when Volkswagen admitted that it used illegal software to cheat emission tests with their diesel. But there was one group that wasn't surprised, automakers. Kent Falck, a future product specialist at Volvo said a recent event that many automakers were very suspicious of Volkswagen's emission results with their TDI engines. Falck explained that many were puzzled as to how Volkswagen was able to achieve lower emissions despite using the same suppliers as other automakers. “We have the same suppliers, we have Bosch, we have Denso, we are working with the same partners, so we know this technology doesn’t exist,” said Falck. “I have known that for seven years.” “We sat in a room and reviewed all the facts, figures, whatever we have, with the specialists. (But) we can’t manage it, how are the others doing it? We don’t know.” At first, Falck thought Volkswagen had some sort of proprietary technology to pull this off without resorting to such technologies such urea injection. “There is always intellectual properties in the world ... there might be something out there in the technology ... that we are not allowed to buy because it’s owned by a supplier. We were wondering how (VW met strict US emissions targets) that’s for sure.” But soon enough, Falck and other people at various automakers realized Volkswagen was going at it an illegal way. Source: News.com.au
  3. The emission cheating that went back to 2006 and would land Volkswagen in deep trouble last September was an open secret in the automaker's engine development department. German newspaper Sueddeutsche Zeitung along with regional broadcasters NDR and WDR reported on Friday some of the results of Volkswagen's internal investigation into the diesel cheating scandal. The cheating goes back to 2006 at Volkswagen's engine development department. With strict U.S. emissions standards looming, the department was given an impossible task; find a cost effective solution to develop clean diesel engines. Pressure from the board and fear of telling their bosses that it could not be done only added to fire of going with cheating. "Within the company there was a culture of 'we can do everything', so to say something cannot be done, was not acceptable," said Sueddeutsche Zeitung in its report (and translated by Reuters). Thus, the decision was made the development team to commit fraud to meet this impossible task. Sueddeutsche Zeitung says the cheating began in earnest in November 2006 and the staff took solace that regulators would not be able to detect the cheating with regular testing methods. The cheat was an open secret to those in the department. That doesn't mean someone tried to speak out. The report says in 2011, a whistleblower who was involved in the deception, told a senior manager outside the department about the cheating. The manager reportedly did nothing. A Volkswagen spokesman declined to comment on what he called 'speculation'. Source: Sueddeutsche Zeitung, Reuters
  4. The emission cheating that went back to 2006 and would land Volkswagen in deep trouble last September was an open secret in the automaker's engine development department. German newspaper Sueddeutsche Zeitung along with regional broadcasters NDR and WDR reported on Friday some of the results of Volkswagen's internal investigation into the diesel cheating scandal. The cheating goes back to 2006 at Volkswagen's engine development department. With strict U.S. emissions standards looming, the department was given an impossible task; find a cost effective solution to develop clean diesel engines. Pressure from the board and fear of telling their bosses that it could not be done only added to fire of going with cheating. "Within the company there was a culture of 'we can do everything', so to say something cannot be done, was not acceptable," said Sueddeutsche Zeitung in its report (and translated by Reuters). Thus, the decision was made the development team to commit fraud to meet this impossible task. Sueddeutsche Zeitung says the cheating began in earnest in November 2006 and the staff took solace that regulators would not be able to detect the cheating with regular testing methods. The cheat was an open secret to those in the department. That doesn't mean someone tried to speak out. The report says in 2011, a whistleblower who was involved in the deception, told a senior manager outside the department about the cheating. The manager reportedly did nothing. A Volkswagen spokesman declined to comment on what he called 'speculation'. Source: Sueddeutsche Zeitung, Reuters View full article

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