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William Maley

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Everything posted by William Maley

  1. I can only speak for me in this case. Doing the monthly (and the monthly/quarterly) numbers was an all-day affair as I would be pulling numbers right as they were being announced (or close to it) and posting them ASAP. It was a lot of work and I would feel quite drained. Since I have started the new job, I really don't have as much time to go do things like - hence why you see me sporadicly post a couple of news stories or the odd review during the week.
  2. Between the rain that is happening tomorrow? I really need to give my car a wash as it needs one quite badly.
  3. Rumor has it that the Malibu will be dropped by 2023
  4. Last month in the rumorpile, we reported that Mazda would be launching two new engine options for the 2021 3; a turbocharged 2.5L four and 2.0L four. Today, Mazda comfirmed the rumors with the announcement of 2021 3. The turbocharged 2.5L four-cylinder is an engine we know quite well as it powers the CX-5, CX-9, and 6 sedan. Output is rated at 227 horsepower and 310 pound-feet (or 250 hp and 320 lb-ft when running on 93 octane). It will come solely paired with a six-speed automatic and all-wheel drive. This model will be positioned above the top-line Premium trim and adds such items as a heated steering wheel, enlarged exhaust tips, and 18-inch aluminum-alloy wheels, As for the 2.0L SkyActiv-G four-cylinder, again its an engine we know from the last-generation 3 and CX-3. It produces a modest 155 hp and 150 lb-ft. This engine is only available on the sedan. We don't have any word on pricing, but we're guessing that 2.0L sedan will be around $20k to $21k. As for the turbo, expect base prices possibly between $28k to $32k. The 2.0L sedan arrives at dealers in August, while the turbo comes in towards the end of the year. Source: Mazda Press Release is on Page 2 2021 MAZDA3 2.5 TURBO: REFINED PERFORMANCE TURBO ENGINE NOW AVAILABLE FOR MAZDA3 HATCHBACK AND SEDAN World Car Design of the Year winner adds enhanced performance Skyactiv-G 2.5T engine will deliver up to 250 horsepower and 320 lb-ft of torque on premium 93 octane fuel IRVINE, Calif. (July 8, 2020) – The launch of the fourth generation Mazda3 stirred emotions with its bold yet sophisticated styling. Renowned as the World Car Design of the Year, fans were captivated by its mature interpretation of Kodo design, but some asked for more power and Mazda listened. Mazda North American Operations (MNAO) today announces the addition of the turbocharged Skyactiv-G 2.5T engine to the 2021 Mazda3 powertrain offering. Connected and engaging driving dynamics mean road trips are no longer just for special occasions. Each experience in the 2021 Mazda3 2.5 Turbo feels more pronounced and spirited. The Skyactiv-G 2.5T engine will deliver an impressive 250 horsepower and 320 lb-ft of torque with premium (93 octane) fuel or a solid 227 horsepower and 310 lb-ft of torque with regular (87 octane) fuel. This engine is specifically calibrated to the Mazda3 so as to deliver the unique driving dynamics expected by our most passionate drivers. The evolution of Mazda’s turbo engine brings a sense of refinement befitting the brand’s recent updates to the i-Activ all-wheel drive (AWD) system. The high torque characteristic of the Skyactiv-G 2.5T paired with the predictive i-Activ AWD create harmony with the driver’s intentions — delivering greater responsiveness and confidence. The Mazda3 2.5 Turbo comes standard with Apple CarPlayTM and Android AutoTM, Mazda Connected Services with three-year trial and in-car Wi-Fi hot spot with six-months or 2GB trial, Bose® 12-speaker premium audio, 8.8-inch large center display with Bluetooth hands-free phone and audio, two front USB inputs and Mazda Advanced Keyless Entry. Complementing the feel of refined performance, heated leather wrapped steering wheel with paddle shifters, frameless auto-dim rearview mirror and chrome finishes around the push button start and glove box are exclusive to the turbo offering. Other interior features include Mazda’s Active Driving Display head-up unit, power moonroof, dual-zone climate control, heated front seats, leatherette seating, leather wrapped shift knob and aluminum speaker grilles. To encourage peace of mind, the Mazda3 2.5 Turbo includes standard i-Activsense safety technologies such as Mazda Radar Cruise Control with stop and go function, Smart Brake Support, Blind Spot Monitoring with Rear Cross-Traffic Alert, Lane Departure Warning with Lane-Keep Assist, Driver Attention Alert, Adaptive Front-lighting system and High Beam Control. Additional standard equipment include larger tailpipes, 18-inch black aluminum alloy wheels, gloss black heated door mirrors, “TURBO” badge on the trunk and on the engine cover, rearview camera, LED daytime running lights, automatic on/off LED signature headlights, rain-sensing windshield wipers and a shark fin antenna. The Mazda3 2.5 Turbo sedan also features a gloss black front grille and sleek lower front bumper decoration. The new 2021 Mazda3 2.5 Turbo with Premium Plus Package heightens the refined styling with a gloss black rear lip spoiler for the sedan while the hatchback is equipped with a gloss black rear roof spoiler and front air dam. Further supporting driving confidence, this top-tier package introduces all-new i-Activsense safety technologies. Rear Smart City Brake Support with Rear Cross-Traffic Braking will automatically apply the brakes when the vehicle is in reverse, if an obstacle or a crossing vehicle is detected. The 360° View Monitor with front and rear parking sensors is now available on the Mazda3 with high-definition digital clarity. A new convenience feature, Traffic Jam Assist enhances Mazda Radar Cruise Control by providing steering inputs at speeds under 40 mph. These advancements in safety technology build upon other features such as Mazda’s Active Driving Display and Adaptive Front-lighting System, which help the Mazda3 stand out among entry-level premium vehicles. The Premium Plus package includes leather seats, navigation and adds HomeLink to the frameless auto-dimming rearview mirror. Fans are encouraged to download the MyMazda mobile app to receive exclusive Mazda content as it becomes available (must have push notifications turned on), including the latest information on Mazda3 2.5 Turbo, which is expected to arrive in dealerships by the end of this year. For information on Mazda3 2.5 Turbo, please visit: https://www.mazdausa.com/vehicles/2021-mazda3-turbo. 2021 MAZDA3: WELL-SUITED WITH ADDED POWERTRAINS Mazda Connected Services and in-car Wi-Fi hot spot standard across all models Available Skyactiv-G 2.0 joins Skyactiv-G 2.5 and Skyactiv-G 2.5T engine in Mazda3 offerings IRVINE, Calif. (July 8, 2020) – Following an impressive World Car Design of the Year win, the world’s best-selling Mazda is not resting on its laurels and will continue to find ways to enrich fan’s lives. Alongside the new Mazda3 2.5 Turbo, two additional powertrains are now available. With many options, fans can find a Mazda3 that best fits their unique lifestyle. Today, Mazda North American Operations is announcing that the 2021 Mazda3 will go on sale in the fall of 2020. New for 2021, the Mazda3 2.0 sedan is equipped with the efficient Skyactiv-G 2.0-liter engine, rated to deliver 155 horsepower and 150 lb-ft of torque with front-wheel drive and standard with G-Vectoring Control Plus. Three-year trial of Mazda Connected Services, which allows the ability to monitor or control certain features of the vehicle through the MyMazda app and includes in-car Wi-Fi hot spot with six-months or 2GB trial are newly standard on all 2021 Mazda3 models. Standard exterior features include LED daytime lights, automatic on/off LED headlights, LED taillights, 16-inch aluminum alloy wheels, matte finish front grille, rearview camera and rain-sensing windshield wipers. The stylish interior is standard with an 8.8-inch large center display, Bluetooth hands-free phone and audio, two USB inputs, AM/FM eight-speaker sound system with HD RadioTM, push button start, electronic parking brake and black cloth seats. Standard i-Activsense safety features comprise of Mazda Radar Cruise Control with stop and go function, Smart Brake Support, Lane Departure Warning with Lane-Keep Assist, Driver Attention Alert and High Beam Control. The Mazda3 2.5S, available in both hatchback and sedan, will continue to offer the Skyactiv-G 2.5-liter engine capable of 186 horsepower and 186 lb-ft of torque and standard front-wheel drive. Apple CarPlayTM and Android AutoTM are standard on Mazda3 2.5S, in addition to all the features equipped on the Mazda3 2.0. The Mazda3 2.5S with Select Package is a new offering for the hatchback and remains available for the sedan. Along with available i-Activ all-wheel drive, this package adds more conveniences such as Blind Spot Monitoring with Rear Cross-Traffic Alert, Mazda Advanced Keyless Entry, dual-zone automatic climate control, leather steering wheel and shift knob, black leatherette seats, rear armrest with cup holders and door mirror turn signals. The Select Package also upgrades to 18-inch gray aluminum alloy wheels. Opening to more potentials, the Mazda3 2.5S with Preferred Package now adds a power moonroof. The Preferred Package consists of heated front seats, gloss black front grille, door mirrors with memory positioning and eight-way power driver seats with power lumbar support and seat memory. As part of this package, the interior and leatherette seats are available in either black or greige. Elevating to the Mazda3 2.5S with Premium Package brings the highest qualities to the hatchback and sedan. New for 2021, this package is enhanced with navigation, Bose® 12-speaker premium audio with aluminum speaker grilles, SiriusXM® that includes a three-month trial subscription and a shark fin antenna. Also included in this package is Active Driving Display, Adaptive Front-lighting System and paddle shifters. Leather seats complement the quality of the interior. Along with available black interior, the white interior option is exclusive to the sedan with the red interior option reserved for the hatchback. For the exterior, this package is equipped with 18-inch black finish aluminum alloy wheels and LED signature illumination headlights and taillights. Limited to the Premium package hatchback FWD, Mazda will continue to offer its Skyactiv-MT six-speed manual transmission. 2021 Mazda3 pricing will be announced on a later date.
  5. Last month in the rumorpile, we reported that Mazda would be launching two new engine options for the 2021 3; a turbocharged 2.5L four and 2.0L four. Today, Mazda comfirmed the rumors with the announcement of 2021 3. The turbocharged 2.5L four-cylinder is an engine we know quite well as it powers the CX-5, CX-9, and 6 sedan. Output is rated at 227 horsepower and 310 pound-feet (or 250 hp and 320 lb-ft when running on 93 octane). It will come solely paired with a six-speed automatic and all-wheel drive. This model will be positioned above the top-line Premium trim and adds such items as a heated steering wheel, enlarged exhaust tips, and 18-inch aluminum-alloy wheels, As for the 2.0L SkyActiv-G four-cylinder, again its an engine we know from the last-generation 3 and CX-3. It produces a modest 155 hp and 150 lb-ft. This engine is only available on the sedan. We don't have any word on pricing, but we're guessing that 2.0L sedan will be around $20k to $21k. As for the turbo, expect base prices possibly between $28k to $32k. The 2.0L sedan arrives at dealers in August, while the turbo comes in towards the end of the year. Source: Mazda Press Release is on Page 2 2021 MAZDA3 2.5 TURBO: REFINED PERFORMANCE TURBO ENGINE NOW AVAILABLE FOR MAZDA3 HATCHBACK AND SEDAN World Car Design of the Year winner adds enhanced performance Skyactiv-G 2.5T engine will deliver up to 250 horsepower and 320 lb-ft of torque on premium 93 octane fuel IRVINE, Calif. (July 8, 2020) – The launch of the fourth generation Mazda3 stirred emotions with its bold yet sophisticated styling. Renowned as the World Car Design of the Year, fans were captivated by its mature interpretation of Kodo design, but some asked for more power and Mazda listened. Mazda North American Operations (MNAO) today announces the addition of the turbocharged Skyactiv-G 2.5T engine to the 2021 Mazda3 powertrain offering. Connected and engaging driving dynamics mean road trips are no longer just for special occasions. Each experience in the 2021 Mazda3 2.5 Turbo feels more pronounced and spirited. The Skyactiv-G 2.5T engine will deliver an impressive 250 horsepower and 320 lb-ft of torque with premium (93 octane) fuel or a solid 227 horsepower and 310 lb-ft of torque with regular (87 octane) fuel. This engine is specifically calibrated to the Mazda3 so as to deliver the unique driving dynamics expected by our most passionate drivers. The evolution of Mazda’s turbo engine brings a sense of refinement befitting the brand’s recent updates to the i-Activ all-wheel drive (AWD) system. The high torque characteristic of the Skyactiv-G 2.5T paired with the predictive i-Activ AWD create harmony with the driver’s intentions — delivering greater responsiveness and confidence. The Mazda3 2.5 Turbo comes standard with Apple CarPlayTM and Android AutoTM, Mazda Connected Services with three-year trial and in-car Wi-Fi hot spot with six-months or 2GB trial, Bose® 12-speaker premium audio, 8.8-inch large center display with Bluetooth hands-free phone and audio, two front USB inputs and Mazda Advanced Keyless Entry. Complementing the feel of refined performance, heated leather wrapped steering wheel with paddle shifters, frameless auto-dim rearview mirror and chrome finishes around the push button start and glove box are exclusive to the turbo offering. Other interior features include Mazda’s Active Driving Display head-up unit, power moonroof, dual-zone climate control, heated front seats, leatherette seating, leather wrapped shift knob and aluminum speaker grilles. To encourage peace of mind, the Mazda3 2.5 Turbo includes standard i-Activsense safety technologies such as Mazda Radar Cruise Control with stop and go function, Smart Brake Support, Blind Spot Monitoring with Rear Cross-Traffic Alert, Lane Departure Warning with Lane-Keep Assist, Driver Attention Alert, Adaptive Front-lighting system and High Beam Control. Additional standard equipment include larger tailpipes, 18-inch black aluminum alloy wheels, gloss black heated door mirrors, “TURBO” badge on the trunk and on the engine cover, rearview camera, LED daytime running lights, automatic on/off LED signature headlights, rain-sensing windshield wipers and a shark fin antenna. The Mazda3 2.5 Turbo sedan also features a gloss black front grille and sleek lower front bumper decoration. The new 2021 Mazda3 2.5 Turbo with Premium Plus Package heightens the refined styling with a gloss black rear lip spoiler for the sedan while the hatchback is equipped with a gloss black rear roof spoiler and front air dam. Further supporting driving confidence, this top-tier package introduces all-new i-Activsense safety technologies. Rear Smart City Brake Support with Rear Cross-Traffic Braking will automatically apply the brakes when the vehicle is in reverse, if an obstacle or a crossing vehicle is detected. The 360° View Monitor with front and rear parking sensors is now available on the Mazda3 with high-definition digital clarity. A new convenience feature, Traffic Jam Assist enhances Mazda Radar Cruise Control by providing steering inputs at speeds under 40 mph. These advancements in safety technology build upon other features such as Mazda’s Active Driving Display and Adaptive Front-lighting System, which help the Mazda3 stand out among entry-level premium vehicles. The Premium Plus package includes leather seats, navigation and adds HomeLink to the frameless auto-dimming rearview mirror. Fans are encouraged to download the MyMazda mobile app to receive exclusive Mazda content as it becomes available (must have push notifications turned on), including the latest information on Mazda3 2.5 Turbo, which is expected to arrive in dealerships by the end of this year. For information on Mazda3 2.5 Turbo, please visit: https://www.mazdausa.com/vehicles/2021-mazda3-turbo. 2021 MAZDA3: WELL-SUITED WITH ADDED POWERTRAINS Mazda Connected Services and in-car Wi-Fi hot spot standard across all models Available Skyactiv-G 2.0 joins Skyactiv-G 2.5 and Skyactiv-G 2.5T engine in Mazda3 offerings IRVINE, Calif. (July 8, 2020) – Following an impressive World Car Design of the Year win, the world’s best-selling Mazda is not resting on its laurels and will continue to find ways to enrich fan’s lives. Alongside the new Mazda3 2.5 Turbo, two additional powertrains are now available. With many options, fans can find a Mazda3 that best fits their unique lifestyle. Today, Mazda North American Operations is announcing that the 2021 Mazda3 will go on sale in the fall of 2020. New for 2021, the Mazda3 2.0 sedan is equipped with the efficient Skyactiv-G 2.0-liter engine, rated to deliver 155 horsepower and 150 lb-ft of torque with front-wheel drive and standard with G-Vectoring Control Plus. Three-year trial of Mazda Connected Services, which allows the ability to monitor or control certain features of the vehicle through the MyMazda app and includes in-car Wi-Fi hot spot with six-months or 2GB trial are newly standard on all 2021 Mazda3 models. Standard exterior features include LED daytime lights, automatic on/off LED headlights, LED taillights, 16-inch aluminum alloy wheels, matte finish front grille, rearview camera and rain-sensing windshield wipers. The stylish interior is standard with an 8.8-inch large center display, Bluetooth hands-free phone and audio, two USB inputs, AM/FM eight-speaker sound system with HD RadioTM, push button start, electronic parking brake and black cloth seats. Standard i-Activsense safety features comprise of Mazda Radar Cruise Control with stop and go function, Smart Brake Support, Lane Departure Warning with Lane-Keep Assist, Driver Attention Alert and High Beam Control. The Mazda3 2.5S, available in both hatchback and sedan, will continue to offer the Skyactiv-G 2.5-liter engine capable of 186 horsepower and 186 lb-ft of torque and standard front-wheel drive. Apple CarPlayTM and Android AutoTM are standard on Mazda3 2.5S, in addition to all the features equipped on the Mazda3 2.0. The Mazda3 2.5S with Select Package is a new offering for the hatchback and remains available for the sedan. Along with available i-Activ all-wheel drive, this package adds more conveniences such as Blind Spot Monitoring with Rear Cross-Traffic Alert, Mazda Advanced Keyless Entry, dual-zone automatic climate control, leather steering wheel and shift knob, black leatherette seats, rear armrest with cup holders and door mirror turn signals. The Select Package also upgrades to 18-inch gray aluminum alloy wheels. Opening to more potentials, the Mazda3 2.5S with Preferred Package now adds a power moonroof. The Preferred Package consists of heated front seats, gloss black front grille, door mirrors with memory positioning and eight-way power driver seats with power lumbar support and seat memory. As part of this package, the interior and leatherette seats are available in either black or greige. Elevating to the Mazda3 2.5S with Premium Package brings the highest qualities to the hatchback and sedan. New for 2021, this package is enhanced with navigation, Bose® 12-speaker premium audio with aluminum speaker grilles, SiriusXM® that includes a three-month trial subscription and a shark fin antenna. Also included in this package is Active Driving Display, Adaptive Front-lighting System and paddle shifters. Leather seats complement the quality of the interior. Along with available black interior, the white interior option is exclusive to the sedan with the red interior option reserved for the hatchback. For the exterior, this package is equipped with 18-inch black finish aluminum alloy wheels and LED signature illumination headlights and taillights. Limited to the Premium package hatchback FWD, Mazda will continue to offer its Skyactiv-MT six-speed manual transmission. 2021 Mazda3 pricing will be announced on a later date. View full article
  6. I felt very mixed when I reviewed the Mitsubishi Outlander last year, There was a lot to like about the crossover, but the list of negatives pushed me towards recommending it if you could find one at a good price. How would I feel when I drove the Outlander PHEV? Spoiler: About the same. (Author's Note: If you're looking for thoughts on the interior, I will direct you to my Mitsubishi Outlander review from last year as the PHEV shares all of the positives and negatives from the standard model.) Not much is different from the standard Outlander I drove last year to the PHEV except for the various hybrid badging around the vehicle, and additional fuel filler door on the rear passenger-side fender housing the charging outlets. The hybrid system is comprised of 60kW electric motors mounted on each axle providing 80 horsepower. The motors draw their power from a 12 kWh lithium-ion battery. A 2.0L inline-four acts as the generator for the battery and can power the wheels in certain situations. Total output stands at 190 hp. The driver has three different drive modes for which the Outlander can operate. EV which makes the Outlander PHEV only run electric power; Battery Save which turns on the engine to power the wheels to save charge; and Battery Charge where the generator charges up the battery. Most of my week, I found myself using Battery Save and Charge when driving on the freeway. Around town, it was left in EV or automatic mode. When the Outlander PHEV is running on electric power only, it provides enough grunt to get out of the way of traffic when leaving a green light. But begin to climb in speed and you realize this isn’t a quick car. Despite the instantaneous torque, the Outlander PHEV does take its time getting up to speed. Some of this can be attributed to the curb weight of 4,222 lbs. Not helping is when the engine comes on to charge/power the wheels. When the engine is put under a load, it sounds very harsh and under a lot of stress. EPA figures for the Outlander PHEV are 74 MPGe (electric and gas combined) and 25 MPG (gas only combined). My average for the week landed around 35 MPGe, which is well under the EPA figure. But I will cut it a fair amount of slack as it arrived during one of the coldest weeks Michigan experienced. For electric-only range, Mitsubishi claims 22 miles. I saw between 16-18 miles which isn’t bad considering the cold temps. On recharging, Mitsubishi says that the Outlander PHEV takes about 13 hours when plugged into 120V/8A outlet, or 8 hours for a 120V/12V outlet. In my testing with 120V charging, it took about 8 hours to fully charge a depleted battery. The Outlander PHEV feels at home on long stretches of road where it shows off one of its strongest attributes, a smooth ride. On some of the roughest roads in Metro Detroit, the Outlander glided over them like it was nothing. On a winding road, the Outlander PHEV feels slightly out of its depth partly due to very num steering. What is surprising is that the PHEV doesn’t have as much body roll as the standard model when put into a corner. I feel conflicted on the 2020 Outlander PHEV as on the surface, it is a pretty competent crossover with the ability to run on electric power only. But the gas engine needs a bit of NVH work and performance could be slightly better. Also, it has several issues that I talked about in the previous Outlander. The final nail is the price; $43,600 for the top-line GT seen here. Yes, it does qualify for a federal tax credit of almost $6,000 that drops the price to under $38,000. But that still a fair amount of money for what is an old crossover. If you can find one at a decent price, around $35,000 or less, then I would say take a closer look at it. Otherwise, wait to see Ford and Toyota’s entrants into the PHEV crossover market. Disclaimer: Mitsubishi Provided the Outlander PHEV, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas Year: 2020 Make: Mitsubishi Model: Outlander PHEV Trim: GT Engine: 60kW Electric Motors (Front and Rear Axles), 2.0L MIVEC DOHC 16-Valve Four-Cylinder Driveline: Single Speed Reduction Gearbox (Front & Rear), All-Wheel Drive Horsepower @ RPM: 80 @ 0 (Electric), 117 @ 4,500 (Gas), 190 (Total) Torque @ RPM: 101 @ 0 (Front Electric Motor), 144 @ 0 (Rear Electric Motor), 137 @ 4,500 (Gas) Fuel Economy: MPGe/Gasoline Combined - 74/25 Curb Weight: 4,222 lbs Location of Manufacture: Okazaki, Japan Base Price: $41,495 As Tested Price: $43,600 (Includes $1,095.00 Destination Charge) Options: GT Premium Interior Package - $400.00 Pearl White Paint - $395.00 Carpeted Floor Mats and Portfolio - $145.00 Charging Cable Storage Bag - $70.00
  7. I felt very mixed when I reviewed the Mitsubishi Outlander last year, There was a lot to like about the crossover, but the list of negatives pushed me towards recommending it if you could find one at a good price. How would I feel when I drove the Outlander PHEV? Spoiler: About the same. (Author's Note: If you're looking for thoughts on the interior, I will direct you to my Mitsubishi Outlander review from last year as the PHEV shares all of the positives and negatives from the standard model.) Not much is different from the standard Outlander I drove last year to the PHEV except for the various hybrid badging around the vehicle, and additional fuel filler door on the rear passenger-side fender housing the charging outlets. The hybrid system is comprised of 60kW electric motors mounted on each axle providing 80 horsepower. The motors draw their power from a 12 kWh lithium-ion battery. A 2.0L inline-four acts as the generator for the battery and can power the wheels in certain situations. Total output stands at 190 hp. The driver has three different drive modes for which the Outlander can operate. EV which makes the Outlander PHEV only run electric power; Battery Save which turns on the engine to power the wheels to save charge; and Battery Charge where the generator charges up the battery. Most of my week, I found myself using Battery Save and Charge when driving on the freeway. Around town, it was left in EV or automatic mode. When the Outlander PHEV is running on electric power only, it provides enough grunt to get out of the way of traffic when leaving a green light. But begin to climb in speed and you realize this isn’t a quick car. Despite the instantaneous torque, the Outlander PHEV does take its time getting up to speed. Some of this can be attributed to the curb weight of 4,222 lbs. Not helping is when the engine comes on to charge/power the wheels. When the engine is put under a load, it sounds very harsh and under a lot of stress. EPA figures for the Outlander PHEV are 74 MPGe (electric and gas combined) and 25 MPG (gas only combined). My average for the week landed around 35 MPGe, which is well under the EPA figure. But I will cut it a fair amount of slack as it arrived during one of the coldest weeks Michigan experienced. For electric-only range, Mitsubishi claims 22 miles. I saw between 16-18 miles which isn’t bad considering the cold temps. On recharging, Mitsubishi says that the Outlander PHEV takes about 13 hours when plugged into 120V/8A outlet, or 8 hours for a 120V/12V outlet. In my testing with 120V charging, it took about 8 hours to fully charge a depleted battery. The Outlander PHEV feels at home on long stretches of road where it shows off one of its strongest attributes, a smooth ride. On some of the roughest roads in Metro Detroit, the Outlander glided over them like it was nothing. On a winding road, the Outlander PHEV feels slightly out of its depth partly due to very num steering. What is surprising is that the PHEV doesn’t have as much body roll as the standard model when put into a corner. I feel conflicted on the 2020 Outlander PHEV as on the surface, it is a pretty competent crossover with the ability to run on electric power only. But the gas engine needs a bit of NVH work and performance could be slightly better. Also, it has several issues that I talked about in the previous Outlander. The final nail is the price; $43,600 for the top-line GT seen here. Yes, it does qualify for a federal tax credit of almost $6,000 that drops the price to under $38,000. But that still a fair amount of money for what is an old crossover. If you can find one at a decent price, around $35,000 or less, then I would say take a closer look at it. Otherwise, wait to see Ford and Toyota’s entrants into the PHEV crossover market. Disclaimer: Mitsubishi Provided the Outlander PHEV, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas Year: 2020 Make: Mitsubishi Model: Outlander PHEV Trim: GT Engine: 60kW Electric Motors (Front and Rear Axles), 2.0L MIVEC DOHC 16-Valve Four-Cylinder Driveline: Single Speed Reduction Gearbox (Front & Rear), All-Wheel Drive Horsepower @ RPM: 80 @ 0 (Electric), 117 @ 4,500 (Gas), 190 (Total) Torque @ RPM: 101 @ 0 (Front Electric Motor), 144 @ 0 (Rear Electric Motor), 137 @ 4,500 (Gas) Fuel Economy: MPGe/Gasoline Combined - 74/25 Curb Weight: 4,222 lbs Location of Manufacture: Okazaki, Japan Base Price: $41,495 As Tested Price: $43,600 (Includes $1,095.00 Destination Charge) Options: GT Premium Interior Package - $400.00 Pearl White Paint - $395.00 Carpeted Floor Mats and Portfolio - $145.00 Charging Cable Storage Bag - $70.00 View full article
  8. Automakers for the most part were hurting in sales during the second quarter. The COVID-19 pandemic and the economy coming to a screeching halt for a brief time caused new car sales to drop by a third according to Automotive News. But there is a slim silver lining to this, full-size pickups have moved into being the best-selling segment of vehicles. According to data from Automotive News, one out of four vehicles sold between April and June was a pickup truck. This helped put them ahead of compact crossovers, which have held the top spot for some time. The reason is that trucks didn't take as big of a hit due to 0 percent financing offers from automakers to help bring in buyers. A large number of dealers said they sold the majority of trucks sitting on their lots. Mark LaNeve, Ford's vice president of U.S. marketing, sales and service provides another reason why trucks didn't fall off a cliff. Speaking to AN, he said that people need trucks for work and "affluent consumers who often buy such vehicles have been less affected by the pandemic." Trucks still took quite the hit in the quarter, Chevrolet Silverado: Down 14% Ford F-Series: Down 23% GMC Sierra: Down 4% Ram: Down 35% Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required) View full article
  9. Automakers for the most part were hurting in sales during the second quarter. The COVID-19 pandemic and the economy coming to a screeching halt for a brief time caused new car sales to drop by a third according to Automotive News. But there is a slim silver lining to this, full-size pickups have moved into being the best-selling segment of vehicles. According to data from Automotive News, one out of four vehicles sold between April and June was a pickup truck. This helped put them ahead of compact crossovers, which have held the top spot for some time. The reason is that trucks didn't take as big of a hit due to 0 percent financing offers from automakers to help bring in buyers. A large number of dealers said they sold the majority of trucks sitting on their lots. Mark LaNeve, Ford's vice president of U.S. marketing, sales and service provides another reason why trucks didn't fall off a cliff. Speaking to AN, he said that people need trucks for work and "affluent consumers who often buy such vehicles have been less affected by the pandemic." Trucks still took quite the hit in the quarter, Chevrolet Silverado: Down 14% Ford F-Series: Down 23% GMC Sierra: Down 4% Ram: Down 35% Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required)
  10. The news came during dinner last Monday. My mother asked if I would be able to take any time off of work, and I said that I might be able to if the circumstances were considered important. She revealed that my grandfather, her dad passed away that afternoon. It wasn’t from COVID-19, but other complications that had put in him the hospital since early June. After dinner, I needed some time and space to begin processing the news. So I grabbed the keys to my car and went for a drive. The past few months have been difficult for all of us in varying degrees with COVID-19. Many places going on lockdown have caused massive disruptions to how we work, travel, and interact with the world. I have been hunkered down at home since mid-March when my employer announced our office would be closed for the time being, and we would be working from home. During the first month or so, I had put a moratorium on driving except for essential places such as the grocery store or pharmacy. Isolating to prevent catching and/or spreading the virus took priority over going for a drive. But after a month of just being in a house with family and doing the same things over and over, I was going stir crazy. I realized that I needed some space to not only prevent myself from losing it, but to give me some room to think about everything floating in my mind. Going for daily walks either by myself or with the dog helped a bit. But I still felt like I needed some more space, more time to myself. Back in 2015, I wrote an Afterthoughts column titled The Escape Machine. I talked about how the car for some of us was a way to escape the world for a time. You could go anywhere depending on how much fuel was in the tank and give the space needed to clear or process whatever was on the mind. I ended the piece with these two lines, That decision for me came in late April/early May. I would go for long drives, provided that I would wear a mask if I got out to go for a walk. Going for the first drive in over a month was a bit of revelation. Turing the steering wheel, pressing down on the accelerator and brake; and watching the world go past in blur made me realize how much I missed this. This seems like a trope, but you have a newfound appreciation for something you haven’t done in some time. This also gave me the space to begin piecing together various thoughts such as how do I keep myself from falling into the endless pit of despair, what can I do to keep myself from feeling bored, and do I dive back into automotive writing. I didn’t know how important this would become in the coming weeks as COVID-19 cases increased, the economy would come to a screeching halt; and the murder of George Floyd and the ensuing fallout. Whenever my mind would become overwhelmed or I just get too frustrated, I would hop into my vehicle and go somewhere. It didn’t matter where or how long, just as long as I had some space to think or to calm down, it would be enough. Back to last Monday night. As I drove, there was a lot I needed to process in terms of grief and wondering what would happen next: Would there be a funeral, what precautions should I take, will it be a long ceremony, and so on. I didn’t come up with any clear answers to these questions, but having that time to start putting things into perspective helped. It was on the way back that another thought popped into my head. At the moment, we’re all trying to find some sense of normal in a world that isn’t. For auto enthusiasts, that is to drive as it gives some sort of control. It may be a small thing, but they provide some much-needed comfort. Like many of us, I don’t what the rest of year holds if it continues to be a landfill fire or somehow begins to contain itself. But I do know that I’ll likely be taking more drives, whether that be my car or one that I’m reviewing. Having something that provides a sense of normal is welcomed. View full article
  11. The news came during dinner last Monday. My mother asked if I would be able to take any time off of work, and I said that I might be able to if the circumstances were considered important. She revealed that my grandfather, her dad passed away that afternoon. It wasn’t from COVID-19, but other complications that had put in him the hospital since early June. After dinner, I needed some time and space to begin processing the news. So I grabbed the keys to my car and went for a drive. The past few months have been difficult for all of us in varying degrees with COVID-19. Many places going on lockdown have caused massive disruptions to how we work, travel, and interact with the world. I have been hunkered down at home since mid-March when my employer announced our office would be closed for the time being, and we would be working from home. During the first month or so, I had put a moratorium on driving except for essential places such as the grocery store or pharmacy. Isolating to prevent catching and/or spreading the virus took priority over going for a drive. But after a month of just being in a house with family and doing the same things over and over, I was going stir crazy. I realized that I needed some space to not only prevent myself from losing it, but to give me some room to think about everything floating in my mind. Going for daily walks either by myself or with the dog helped a bit. But I still felt like I needed some more space, more time to myself. Back in 2015, I wrote an Afterthoughts column titled The Escape Machine. I talked about how the car for some of us was a way to escape the world for a time. You could go anywhere depending on how much fuel was in the tank and give the space needed to clear or process whatever was on the mind. I ended the piece with these two lines, That decision for me came in late April/early May. I would go for long drives, provided that I would wear a mask if I got out to go for a walk. Going for the first drive in over a month was a bit of revelation. Turing the steering wheel, pressing down on the accelerator and brake; and watching the world go past in blur made me realize how much I missed this. This seems like a trope, but you have a newfound appreciation for something you haven’t done in some time. This also gave me the space to begin piecing together various thoughts such as how do I keep myself from falling into the endless pit of despair, what can I do to keep myself from feeling bored, and do I dive back into automotive writing. I didn’t know how important this would become in the coming weeks as COVID-19 cases increased, the economy would come to a screeching halt; and the murder of George Floyd and the ensuing fallout. Whenever my mind would become overwhelmed or I just get too frustrated, I would hop into my vehicle and go somewhere. It didn’t matter where or how long, just as long as I had some space to think or to calm down, it would be enough. Back to last Monday night. As I drove, there was a lot I needed to process in terms of grief and wondering what would happen next: Would there be a funeral, what precautions should I take, will it be a long ceremony, and so on. I didn’t come up with any clear answers to these questions, but having that time to start putting things into perspective helped. It was on the way back that another thought popped into my head. At the moment, we’re all trying to find some sense of normal in a world that isn’t. For auto enthusiasts, that is to drive as it gives some sort of control. It may be a small thing, but they provide some much-needed comfort. Like many of us, I don’t what the rest of year holds if it continues to be a landfill fire or somehow begins to contain itself. But I do know that I’ll likely be taking more drives, whether that be my car or one that I’m reviewing. Having something that provides a sense of normal is welcomed.
  12. Glad to see the rear wing of the G6 GXP Coupe lives on

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