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Found 3 results

  1. Automakers have been trying different technologies and ideas in an effort to boost fuel economy and reduce emissions. On paper, the new technologies do make a difference. But in the real world, it is a completely different matter. Emissions Analytics, an independent U.K.-based company has been investigating what technologies actually make a difference in reducing emissions and fuel consumption. For the past four years, the company has tested over 500 vehicles in the U.S. since 2013 in real-world driving situations. Globally, it has tested over 1,000 vehicles. Next month, the company will be releasing a study showing which of those technologies help and hurt. "You can only decide if you have the right information. The EPA sticker is — I would say — good up to a point, but we can give a lot more information," said Nick Molden, Emissions Analytics' founder and CEO. Their data shows that over four years of testing in the U.S., there is "no actual improvement in overall fuel economy and no decrease in CO2 emissions," despite new technologies and complex powertrains. EA's data also revealed that downsized turbo engines show huge discrepancies between the EPA's findings and the real world. In the lab, the engines aren't put under stress and can produce high fuel economy figures. But it is a different story out in the real world when the turbos are engaged to keep up with traffic and becomes less efficient than a non-turbocharged engine. "Downsizing is a good thing up to a point. You go past a certain inflection point and actually you can find that the real-world mpg will actually get worse if you go too small," said Molden. "As soon as you start going below 2 liters, that's where we start seeing the gaps open up between EPA sticker and real world." The study did deliver some good news for hybrids. EA found traditional hybrid vehicle provided high fuel economy figures and reduced emissions. Other technologies such as multispeed transmissions, adding lightness, and picking the right tires provide a meaningful impact. Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required) View full article
  2. Automakers have been trying different technologies and ideas in an effort to boost fuel economy and reduce emissions. On paper, the new technologies do make a difference. But in the real world, it is a completely different matter. Emissions Analytics, an independent U.K.-based company has been investigating what technologies actually make a difference in reducing emissions and fuel consumption. For the past four years, the company has tested over 500 vehicles in the U.S. since 2013 in real-world driving situations. Globally, it has tested over 1,000 vehicles. Next month, the company will be releasing a study showing which of those technologies help and hurt. "You can only decide if you have the right information. The EPA sticker is — I would say — good up to a point, but we can give a lot more information," said Nick Molden, Emissions Analytics' founder and CEO. Their data shows that over four years of testing in the U.S., there is "no actual improvement in overall fuel economy and no decrease in CO2 emissions," despite new technologies and complex powertrains. EA's data also revealed that downsized turbo engines show huge discrepancies between the EPA's findings and the real world. In the lab, the engines aren't put under stress and can produce high fuel economy figures. But it is a different story out in the real world when the turbos are engaged to keep up with traffic and becomes less efficient than a non-turbocharged engine. "Downsizing is a good thing up to a point. You go past a certain inflection point and actually you can find that the real-world mpg will actually get worse if you go too small," said Molden. "As soon as you start going below 2 liters, that's where we start seeing the gaps open up between EPA sticker and real world." The study did deliver some good news for hybrids. EA found traditional hybrid vehicle provided high fuel economy figures and reduced emissions. Other technologies such as multispeed transmissions, adding lightness, and picking the right tires provide a meaningful impact. Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required)
  3. G. David Felt Staff Writer Alternative Energy - www.CheersandGears.com Bosch Selling WaterBoost Injection for Turbo Engines Seems since BMW M4 using a Bosch water injection system that works, Bosch has decided this is what the future is for all turbo engines and has come out with a solution kit to sell to all OEMs of Turbo Engines called WaterBoost. Essentially this is added to the intake side with a water vapor injection to cool the piston, increasing density and driving longer life and more power from the engine. This technology is not new and has been around since WWII when it was used in supercharged planes to assist during hard maneuvers and intense battle fights. The early days of water injection for auto's started with the 1962 Oldsmobile Cutlass Turbo Jetfire, water injection made another appearance in the 1980's in Formula 1 cars. Bosch states 2019 for kit availability to OEMS and aftermarket. As per the Seattle Times story, biggest challenge will be to get the OEMs to redesign their intake system to accept the waterboost injector and customers having to refill the storage bottle with Distilled water. The second issue might not be so hard at least for Diesel owners who are already used to filling up their Urea bottles to clean up their emissions. Yet will the average petro driver want to deal with refilling a water bottle on the engine and how long will the water bottle last, what happens once it is empty, will the engine still run or stop or detune? Interesting times we live in for the auto industry builders. Big question is what is the cost? Will it be worth the 5% greater engine performance, 13% less fuel consumption and 4% less CO2 emitted per the Bosch web site? Info Source Bosch web site Seattle Times web site

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