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Ghost Dog

Key GM-Delphi-UAW talks said to stall

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Ghost Dog    1

http://money.cnn.com/2006/02/09/news/companies/gm_delphi/

The talks are seen as a key to GM's efforts to avoid a bankruptcy filing of its own and return to profitability. GM has said it could be on the hook for as much as $12 billion in contract obligations to its former employees at Delphi as the auto parts maker demands deep pay and benefit cuts from the union.

Delphi has threatened to ask the bankruptcy court to void current labor deals without an agreement on concessions, a move that could spark a strike and cripple production at GM.

The paper reported that UAW Vice President Richard Shoemaker said Tuesday that talks have made little progress, and that a long strike is unavoidable if Delphi tries to throw out the current union contract.

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Ghost Dog    1

It's time to throw the gauntlet down with the UAW. GM should de-unionize their plants quietly one by one. Unions are a thing of the past. The UAW must die as a useless relic of the past.

Only the workers can Decertify the Union. Chances of that happening? None.

http://www.mlive.com/news/fljournal/index....9680.xml&coll=5

Edited by Ghost Dog

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ellives    0

I fear you're right to which I say "take them down with the ship!" It's high time GM stopped kissing their asses. The goose that laid the golden eggs has died. The UAW has been unsuccessful at Toyota so they should die and die quickly. As much as we want to complain about bad GM decisions, quality or designs, in the end it's all about money. GM can't afford to spend the R&D money to build a better product than Toyota when they have a $2K disadvantage per vehicle sold. When will we wake up to this?

Only the workers can Decertify the Union. Chances of that happening? None.

http://www.mlive.com/news/fljournal/index....9680.xml&coll=5

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ellives    0

... to which I say GM should offer the Delphi workers a non-union job with a defined contribution retirement plan if they opt to take it. No more defined benefit plans should be negotiated or even be on the table. They're just going to saddle GM with yet another obligation further degrading their competitive situation. Let Delphi go bankrupt and get the court to void the contract.

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Ghost Dog    1

If Delphi does strike, can non-union workers be hired right away?  I don't know how this works.

EEk! Those parts would be reliable for sure.

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ellives    0

If Delphi does strike, can non-union workers be hired right away?  I don't know how this works.

Nobody can really predict what will happen. The union likes to use the George W. tactic: Fear Uncertainty and Doubt (FUD.) In the end the UAW has to know the free ride is over and they'll HAVE to accept some major concessions if they intend to survive at all.

It will be a dare game to see which side dares to take the risk. GM will risk the strike if they insist on more concessions than the UAW will accept and the UAW will take the risk of having GM say no to their demands, which is something likely to happen since GM simply can not continue to be burdened with costs that are out of touch with the reality of the marketplace (and still survive.)

Personally I suspect (and hope) that GM and Wagoner grow a pair and tell the UAW to get out and see how many workers renounce the union and come to work anyway. The non-union thing works fine for Toyota - it should work fine for GM too.

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Ghost Dog    1

Nobody can really predict what will happen. The union likes to use the George W. tactic: Fear Uncertainty and Doubt (FUD.) In the end the UAW has to know the free ride is over and they'll HAVE to accept some major concessions if they intend to survive at all.

It will be a dare game to see which side dares to take the risk. GM will risk the strike if they insist on more concessions than the UAW will accept and the UAW will take the risk of having GM say no to their demands, which is something likely to happen since GM simply can not continue to be burdened with costs that are out of touch with the reality of the marketplace (and still survive.)

Personally I suspect (and hope) that GM and Wagoner grow a pair and tell the UAW to get out and see how many workers renounce the union and come to work anyway. The non-union thing works fine for Toyota - it should work fine for GM too.

Free Men don't "HAVE" to do anything.

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Ghost Dog    1

Is it true that Delphi supplies some parts to Toyota?  If it is a company wide strike would end up hurting them as well.

http://www.thecarconnection.com/Auto_News/...S175.A9913.html

It turns out Delphi is one of the top three suppliers for GM's Japanese archrival, Toyota. "Delphi is really important for us," confirmed Toyota media relations manager Dan Sieger. "If it runs into problems, it could hurt us, too." Delphi has six major plants specifically serving Toyota's North American assembly lines, providing the Asian maker with the likes of steering columns, vehicle sensors, climate control components and other important bits and pieces. Those goods go into critical models, including the Avalon, Corolla, Matrix, Sequoia - and the new Camry. Toyota would certainly like to avoid problems that could foul the launch of that hotly-touted sedan.

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