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Tesla BREAKS Consumer Reports Scoring System with a 103 score!

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Yahoo has this great video on consumers reports review of the new Tesla P85D model.

 

https://www.yahoo.com/autos/tesla-model-s-p85d-breaks-the-consumer-reports-127707921452.html

 

Pretty interesting to listen to them, they admit it is not a perfect car, but still blew everything away with a 103 score.

 

Your thoughts?

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The Tesla must be better than perfect.   CR should retro-active adjust all other scores and take 3 points off every car off all time.   If Toyota ever makes an all electric Prius it will probably get 110 points out of a possible 100.

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