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Tesla BREAKS Consumer Reports Scoring System with a 103 score!

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Yahoo has this great video on consumers reports review of the new Tesla P85D model.

 

https://www.yahoo.com/autos/tesla-model-s-p85d-breaks-the-consumer-reports-127707921452.html

 

Pretty interesting to listen to them, they admit it is not a perfect car, but still blew everything away with a 103 score.

 

Your thoughts?

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Consumer Reports' rating system has been broken for decades...... they're only just now getting around to reporting the fact. 

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The Tesla must be better than perfect.   CR should retro-active adjust all other scores and take 3 points off every car off all time.   If Toyota ever makes an all electric Prius it will probably get 110 points out of a possible 100.

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    • By William Maley
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      Sources tell the FT that Tesla is also looking outside of the company for a possible replacement.
      Tesla didn't respond for comment, but Elon Musk took to Twitter last night to respond.
      "This is incorrect," he wrote.
      Source: Financial Times (Subscription Required), Bloomberg

      View full article
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