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Found 4 results

  1. Purchasing a car at a dealership is a stressful and painful experience: Finding the right vehicle, dealing with various sales and finance people, mountains of paperwork, and so on. Hyundai is hoping a new program will make the experience slightly better. Hyundai Shopper Assurance promises to streamline the buying process with four key parts; fair-market pricing (MSRP minus incentives and dealer discounts), flexible test drives at a customer's place of choice, streamlined purchasing process, and three-day money back guarantee. “Shopper Assurance is the next step in that tradition and is car buying made simple. We expect this to be a differentiator, as our research showed that 84 percent of people would visit a dealership that offered all four features over one that did not. It is the future of car buying, and our commitment to creating a flexible, efficient and better way to purchase a car in partnership with our dealer body,” said Dean Evans, chief marketing officer for Hyundai Motor America. Most of the parts are self-explanatory except for the 'streamlined purchasing process'. This means a buyer can complete the paperwork, apply for financing, get a credit approval, figure out monthly payments, and value their trade-in all from the comfort of their home. Hyundai will launch Shopper Assurance in four markets this year; Dallas, Houston, Miami, and Orlando. The program will expand nationwide early next year. Source: Hyundai Press Release is on Page 2 HYUNDAI TRANSFORMS RETAIL CAR BUYING WITH SHOPPER ASSURANCE Industry-First Nationwide Commitment to Modernizing Car Shopping Offers More Options and Convenience for Customers Launches Today in Miami, Orlando, Dallas and Houston and Will Roll Out to All Hyundai Dealers in Early 2018 FOUNTAIN VALLEY, Calif., Oct. 10, 2017 – In building on the brand promise to provide customers with a better experience, Hyundai introduces Shopper Assurance, an industry-first nationwide program that streamlines and modernizes the car-buying experience. Today, a majority of car buyers are frustrated with the automotive retail experience and are looking for new ways to shop for and buy a new car. Shopper Assurance focuses on four elements that make the often arduous process of purchasing a car easier, faster and worry-free. Transparent Pricing: Participating dealers post the fair market pricing (MSRP minus incentives and any dealer offered discounts) on the dealer websites, so the customer knows exactly what the market pricing is for the vehicle. This can reduce the time it takes to negotiate a price and can eliminate the frustration of widely advertised incentives not being available on dealer websites. Flexible Test Drive: Customers are given the option to conduct a test drive for any new vehicle on their own terms through Hyundai Drive, a platform that allows the test drive to be scheduled by contacting the dealer on their website, by phone or by using a custom-built app (in available markets). The selected test-drive vehicle can be at a location of the customer’s choosing, such as their home, their office or a coffee shop. Streamlined Purchase: Reduces the time customers spend at the dealer by allowing car buyers to complete most of the paperwork online prior to visiting the dealership for a vehicle in the dealer’s inventory. This includes applying for financing, obtaining credit approvals, calculating payment estimates and valuing trade-ins. Three-Day Money Back Guarantee: Any customer who is not satisfied with their purchase is given a three-day buy back period to return the car for a full refund, contingent upon a dealer inspection and the vehicle having fewer than 300 miles since the purchase/lease date. This turns potential second thoughts into peace of mind. “For nearly a decade, the word ‘Assurance’ has been synonymous with Hyundai and represents our efforts in redefining the car ownership experience,” said Dean Evans, chief marketing officer, Hyundai Motor America. “Shopper Assurance is the next step in that tradition and is car buying made simple. We expect this to be a differentiator, as our research showed that 84 percent of people would visit a dealership that offered all four features over one that did not. It is the future of car buying, and our commitment to creating a flexible, efficient and better way to purchase a car in partnership with our dealer body.” “We’ve listened to our customers, and they want convenience and simplicity when it comes to buying a car. Shopper Assurance is going to give our dealers the tools we need to exceed the expectations of today’s shopper,” said Andrew DiFeo, chairman, Hyundai National Dealer Council and dealer principal, Hyundai of St. Augustine. “With a strong lineup of new cars and CUVs, we expect that Shopper Assurance will give us a competitive advantage and help turn prospects into buyers. We are creating a modern purchasing process where transparency and convenience are paramount.” Shopper Assurance is available for any new model in the Hyundai lineup and will initially launch in dealerships in four markets: Miami, Orlando, Dallas and Houston. It will be live nationwide by early 2018.
  2. Purchasing a car at a dealership is a stressful and painful experience: Finding the right vehicle, dealing with various sales and finance people, mountains of paperwork, and so on. Hyundai is hoping a new program will make the experience slightly better. Hyundai Shopper Assurance promises to streamline the buying process with four key parts; fair-market pricing (MSRP minus incentives and dealer discounts), flexible test drives at a customer's place of choice, streamlined purchasing process, and three-day money back guarantee. “Shopper Assurance is the next step in that tradition and is car buying made simple. We expect this to be a differentiator, as our research showed that 84 percent of people would visit a dealership that offered all four features over one that did not. It is the future of car buying, and our commitment to creating a flexible, efficient and better way to purchase a car in partnership with our dealer body,” said Dean Evans, chief marketing officer for Hyundai Motor America. Most of the parts are self-explanatory except for the 'streamlined purchasing process'. This means a buyer can complete the paperwork, apply for financing, get a credit approval, figure out monthly payments, and value their trade-in all from the comfort of their home. Hyundai will launch Shopper Assurance in four markets this year; Dallas, Houston, Miami, and Orlando. The program will expand nationwide early next year. Source: Hyundai Press Release is on Page 2 HYUNDAI TRANSFORMS RETAIL CAR BUYING WITH SHOPPER ASSURANCE Industry-First Nationwide Commitment to Modernizing Car Shopping Offers More Options and Convenience for Customers Launches Today in Miami, Orlando, Dallas and Houston and Will Roll Out to All Hyundai Dealers in Early 2018 FOUNTAIN VALLEY, Calif., Oct. 10, 2017 – In building on the brand promise to provide customers with a better experience, Hyundai introduces Shopper Assurance, an industry-first nationwide program that streamlines and modernizes the car-buying experience. Today, a majority of car buyers are frustrated with the automotive retail experience and are looking for new ways to shop for and buy a new car. Shopper Assurance focuses on four elements that make the often arduous process of purchasing a car easier, faster and worry-free. Transparent Pricing: Participating dealers post the fair market pricing (MSRP minus incentives and any dealer offered discounts) on the dealer websites, so the customer knows exactly what the market pricing is for the vehicle. This can reduce the time it takes to negotiate a price and can eliminate the frustration of widely advertised incentives not being available on dealer websites. Flexible Test Drive: Customers are given the option to conduct a test drive for any new vehicle on their own terms through Hyundai Drive, a platform that allows the test drive to be scheduled by contacting the dealer on their website, by phone or by using a custom-built app (in available markets). The selected test-drive vehicle can be at a location of the customer’s choosing, such as their home, their office or a coffee shop. Streamlined Purchase: Reduces the time customers spend at the dealer by allowing car buyers to complete most of the paperwork online prior to visiting the dealership for a vehicle in the dealer’s inventory. This includes applying for financing, obtaining credit approvals, calculating payment estimates and valuing trade-ins. Three-Day Money Back Guarantee: Any customer who is not satisfied with their purchase is given a three-day buy back period to return the car for a full refund, contingent upon a dealer inspection and the vehicle having fewer than 300 miles since the purchase/lease date. This turns potential second thoughts into peace of mind. “For nearly a decade, the word ‘Assurance’ has been synonymous with Hyundai and represents our efforts in redefining the car ownership experience,” said Dean Evans, chief marketing officer, Hyundai Motor America. “Shopper Assurance is the next step in that tradition and is car buying made simple. We expect this to be a differentiator, as our research showed that 84 percent of people would visit a dealership that offered all four features over one that did not. It is the future of car buying, and our commitment to creating a flexible, efficient and better way to purchase a car in partnership with our dealer body.” “We’ve listened to our customers, and they want convenience and simplicity when it comes to buying a car. Shopper Assurance is going to give our dealers the tools we need to exceed the expectations of today’s shopper,” said Andrew DiFeo, chairman, Hyundai National Dealer Council and dealer principal, Hyundai of St. Augustine. “With a strong lineup of new cars and CUVs, we expect that Shopper Assurance will give us a competitive advantage and help turn prospects into buyers. We are creating a modern purchasing process where transparency and convenience are paramount.” Shopper Assurance is available for any new model in the Hyundai lineup and will initially launch in dealerships in four markets: Miami, Orlando, Dallas and Houston. It will be live nationwide by early 2018. View full article
  3. Whenever someone finds out that I'm an automotive writer, sooner or later I will get asked "I'm looking for 'x' vehicle and I was wondering if you could help me out," or some other variation. These are the times where I wish I could make a smoke cloud appear, allowing me to make an escape. But alas, that is only a dream. This is a common thing that a number of us - automotive writers - tend to get whether it is from family, friends, or some random stranger. We want to try and help, but most of the time the suggestions seem to go nowhere. It comes down to various reasons such as none of the ideas are appealing or the person going in a completely different direction (wanted a sedan, now interested in a crossover). But I also believe that we as a group need to take some of the blame as we sometimes try to push someone into a vehicle they are not interested or vice versa. I learned this at an early age when I was trying to push my parents away from leasing a Ford Freestyle due to the poor reviews it got in the automotive press. They ended up with one and I ate my fair amount of crow as I grew to like the Freestyle. Other times, it seems that the suggestions we give out are a bit ridiculous. For example, recommending someone getting a high-performance wagon when all they want is a crossover. I can't help but wonder if some of the suggestions I have heard are due to someone trying to live vicariously through another person. Aside from wishing I could throw on an invisibility cloak whenever this question is asked, I have been trying figure out what could be the best way to help someone while giving myself some plausible deniability. It hit me recently when I was at friend’s birthday gathering. I was chatting with my friend’s dad and he asked me about what car should he recommend to a co-worker. She was looking at a BMW X3 and wanted to know if this was a good choice. Plus, was there any other vehicles she should consider? To get my mind in the right place, I found myself asking a lot of questions. Did she have kids? What are her big considerations? Are there types of vehicles or brands she doesn’t want to deal with? How much does she want to spend? So on and so forth. It was a version of twenty questions where there is no correct answer and somehow less fun. Once I had gotten enough information to get my mind working, I began to recommend a few vehicles that are worth a closer look such as the Audi Q5, Lincoln MKC, and Subaru Outback. I also said the new X3 is quite good and would possibly consider going with a certified pre-owned model for a slightly lower price and warranty. After having this conversation, it hit me: I had figured out a possible fool proof way of offering car advice. It comes down to me taking on the role of a guide where I ask a person what they are and are not interested in, and build out a group of vehicles that I can show someone that possibly fits what they are looking. I don't know what the co-worker ended up choosing and I hope to find out in the near future. So if you want to ask me what car you want to buy, be prepared to answer a lot of questions and not be given a definitive answer. You might be annoyed by this, but the end result is hopefully you finding a car that works. Plus, we might be on speaking terms after this.
  4. Whenever someone finds out that I'm an automotive writer, sooner or later I will get asked "I'm looking for 'x' vehicle and I was wondering if you could help me out," or some other variation. These are the times where I wish I could make a smoke cloud appear, allowing me to make an escape. But alas, that is only a dream. This is a common thing that a number of us - automotive writers - tend to get whether it is from family, friends, or some random stranger. We want to try and help, but most of the time the suggestions seem to go nowhere. It comes down to various reasons such as none of the ideas are appealing or the person going in a completely different direction (wanted a sedan, now interested in a crossover). But I also believe that we as a group need to take some of the blame as we sometimes try to push someone into a vehicle they are not interested or vice versa. I learned this at an early age when I was trying to push my parents away from leasing a Ford Freestyle due to the poor reviews it got in the automotive press. They ended up with one and I ate my fair amount of crow as I grew to like the Freestyle. Other times, it seems that the suggestions we give out are a bit ridiculous. For example, recommending someone getting a high-performance wagon when all they want is a crossover. I can't help but wonder if some of the suggestions I have heard are due to someone trying to live vicariously through another person. Aside from wishing I could throw on an invisibility cloak whenever this question is asked, I have been trying figure out what could be the best way to help someone while giving myself some plausible deniability. It hit me recently when I was at friend’s birthday gathering. I was chatting with my friend’s dad and he asked me about what car should he recommend to a co-worker. She was looking at a BMW X3 and wanted to know if this was a good choice. Plus, was there any other vehicles she should consider? To get my mind in the right place, I found myself asking a lot of questions. Did she have kids? What are her big considerations? Are there types of vehicles or brands she doesn’t want to deal with? How much does she want to spend? So on and so forth. It was a version of twenty questions where there is no correct answer and somehow less fun. Once I had gotten enough information to get my mind working, I began to recommend a few vehicles that are worth a closer look such as the Audi Q5, Lincoln MKC, and Subaru Outback. I also said the new X3 is quite good and would possibly consider going with a certified pre-owned model for a slightly lower price and warranty. After having this conversation, it hit me: I had figured out a possible fool proof way of offering car advice. It comes down to me taking on the role of a guide where I ask a person what they are and are not interested in, and build out a group of vehicles that I can show someone that possibly fits what they are looking. I don't know what the co-worker ended up choosing and I hope to find out in the near future. So if you want to ask me what car you want to buy, be prepared to answer a lot of questions and not be given a definitive answer. You might be annoyed by this, but the end result is hopefully you finding a car that works. Plus, we might be on speaking terms after this. View full article

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