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Found 9 results

  1. I was a bit surprised when I got word that I would be spending a few days with a Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross only a few weeks after doing a brief first drive. As I noted in my report, I came away pretty impressed with certain aspects of this latest contender in the compact crossover class. But there were some items that I needed more time to mess around with such as the infotainment system and powertrain. With a bit more time behind the wheel, how would Mitsubishi’s newest model fare? As I talked about in my quick first drive, Mitsubishi’s design staff went crazy with the Eclipse Cross. Sharp angles, a split shape for the tailgate, and aggressive front end treatment will draw a lot of comment. But credit should be given to the design team as they have created something that does stand out in a very crowded class. The polarizing design can be toned down a lot if you choose a different color than the red as seen on my tester. Sadly, that polarizing design doesn’t carry into the interior. But the plain look does allow for most controls to be easy to find and reach. Only the placement of the trip computer controls (behind the steering wheel) and climate control (nestled deep in the center stack) will invoke some frustration. Mitsubishi has also made some noticeable improvements to overall interior quality. There are higher quality hard plastics and some soft-touch materials used throughout. Also, there were no glaring build quality concerns that I noticed in the Outlander Sport. The front seats provide decent support for short trips, but I was wishing for more padding after doing a day trip to Ohio. The sloping roofline and large sunroof will eat into rear headroom, but legroom is decent for most passengers. Cargo space is on the low side with 22.6 cubic feet with the seats up and 48.9 cubic feet when folded. The sloping tailgate design does also mean you’ll need to plan carefully as to how you plan on loading cargo. Mitsubishi equips all Eclipse Cross models with a seven-inch touchscreen, but only the LE and above get a free-standing version with a touchpad controller. The touchpad controller reminds a lot of the Lexus’ Remote Touch system and its issues. Both systems exhibit some slowness to respond when your finger is moving across the pad. At least the Mitsubishi system has a touchscreen as another input method, but you’ll be stretching your arm to use it. The graphics and overall performance do trail competitors, but it is a huge step forward when compared to the previous systems Mitsubishi has installed. Android Auto and Apple CarPlay compatibility are standard on LE models and above. A new turbocharged 1.5L four-cylinder powers the Eclipse Cross. Output is rated at 152 horsepower and 184 pound-feet of torque. All models come with a CVT and the choice of either front or Mitsubishi’s Super All-Wheel-Control (S-AWC). During my first drive, I came away mostly impressed with the turbo-four as it moved the vehicle with subtle verve around town. This still held true during my time with the vehicle. But I did find the engine runs out of steam at higher speeds, making it somewhat difficult to pass quickly when traveling on the highway. Also, the engine does sound somewhat unrefined in hard acceleration. The CVT is similar; providing excellent performance around town, but noticeably struggles on the highway. EPA fuel economy on the Eclipse Cross SEL S-AWC is 25 City/26 Highway/25 Combined. My average for the five-day period I had the vehicle landed around 27.2 on a 70/30 mix of highway and city driving. Despite the Eclipse name on the vehicle, this is not a sporty crossover. There is pronounced body lean and the steering feels noticeably light. But for most buyers, this is not a big issue. They’re more concerned about how the Eclipse Cross rides and the news is better. The suspension does a great job of absorbing most bumps. Wind noise is kept to very acceptable levels, but there was a fair amount of road noise coming inside - especially when traveling on the highway. This makes long trips somewhat tiring. While many enthusiasts may bemoan the fact that Mitsubishi is using the Eclipse name on a crossover, I’ll be the first to admit this is their best vehicle in quite some time. The design and turbo engine help the model stand out in what is becoming a quite crowded class. Plus, the starting price of $23,295 for the base ES makes it quite tempting. Still, the Eclipse Cross does trail the pack in terms of comfort, cargo space, and performance at higher speeds. There is room for improvement, but Mitsubishi has most of the basics right on the money. Disclaimer: Mitsubishi Provided the Eclipse Cross, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas Year: 2018 Make: Mitsubishi Model: Eclipse Cross Trim: SEL S-AWC Engine: Turbocharged 1.5L Direct-Injected Four-Cylinder Driveline: CVT, All-Wheel Drive Horsepower @ RPM: 152 @ 5,550 Torque @ RPM: 184 @ 2,000 Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 25/26/25 Curb Weight: 3,516 lbs Location of Manufacture: Okazaki, Japan Base Price: $27,895 As Tested Price: $32,310 (Includes $995.00 Destination Charge) Options: Touring Package - $2,500.00 Red Diamond Paint - $595.00 Accessory Tonneau Cover - $190.00 Accessory Carpeted Floormats and Portfolio - $135.00 View full article
  2. I was a bit surprised when I got word that I would be spending a few days with a Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross only a few weeks after doing a brief first drive. As I noted in my report, I came away pretty impressed with certain aspects of this latest contender in the compact crossover class. But there were some items that I needed more time to mess around with such as the infotainment system and powertrain. With a bit more time behind the wheel, how would Mitsubishi’s newest model fare? As I talked about in my quick first drive, Mitsubishi’s design staff went crazy with the Eclipse Cross. Sharp angles, a split shape for the tailgate, and aggressive front end treatment will draw a lot of comment. But credit should be given to the design team as they have created something that does stand out in a very crowded class. The polarizing design can be toned down a lot if you choose a different color than the red as seen on my tester. Sadly, that polarizing design doesn’t carry into the interior. But the plain look does allow for most controls to be easy to find and reach. Only the placement of the trip computer controls (behind the steering wheel) and climate control (nestled deep in the center stack) will invoke some frustration. Mitsubishi has also made some noticeable improvements to overall interior quality. There are higher quality hard plastics and some soft-touch materials used throughout. Also, there were no glaring build quality concerns that I noticed in the Outlander Sport. The front seats provide decent support for short trips, but I was wishing for more padding after doing a day trip to Ohio. The sloping roofline and large sunroof will eat into rear headroom, but legroom is decent for most passengers. Cargo space is on the low side with 22.6 cubic feet with the seats up and 48.9 cubic feet when folded. The sloping tailgate design does also mean you’ll need to plan carefully as to how you plan on loading cargo. Mitsubishi equips all Eclipse Cross models with a seven-inch touchscreen, but only the LE and above get a free-standing version with a touchpad controller. The touchpad controller reminds a lot of the Lexus’ Remote Touch system and its issues. Both systems exhibit some slowness to respond when your finger is moving across the pad. At least the Mitsubishi system has a touchscreen as another input method, but you’ll be stretching your arm to use it. The graphics and overall performance do trail competitors, but it is a huge step forward when compared to the previous systems Mitsubishi has installed. Android Auto and Apple CarPlay compatibility are standard on LE models and above. A new turbocharged 1.5L four-cylinder powers the Eclipse Cross. Output is rated at 152 horsepower and 184 pound-feet of torque. All models come with a CVT and the choice of either front or Mitsubishi’s Super All-Wheel-Control (S-AWC). During my first drive, I came away mostly impressed with the turbo-four as it moved the vehicle with subtle verve around town. This still held true during my time with the vehicle. But I did find the engine runs out of steam at higher speeds, making it somewhat difficult to pass quickly when traveling on the highway. Also, the engine does sound somewhat unrefined in hard acceleration. The CVT is similar; providing excellent performance around town, but noticeably struggles on the highway. EPA fuel economy on the Eclipse Cross SEL S-AWC is 25 City/26 Highway/25 Combined. My average for the five-day period I had the vehicle landed around 27.2 on a 70/30 mix of highway and city driving. Despite the Eclipse name on the vehicle, this is not a sporty crossover. There is pronounced body lean and the steering feels noticeably light. But for most buyers, this is not a big issue. They’re more concerned about how the Eclipse Cross rides and the news is better. The suspension does a great job of absorbing most bumps. Wind noise is kept to very acceptable levels, but there was a fair amount of road noise coming inside - especially when traveling on the highway. This makes long trips somewhat tiring. While many enthusiasts may bemoan the fact that Mitsubishi is using the Eclipse name on a crossover, I’ll be the first to admit this is their best vehicle in quite some time. The design and turbo engine help the model stand out in what is becoming a quite crowded class. Plus, the starting price of $23,295 for the base ES makes it quite tempting. Still, the Eclipse Cross does trail the pack in terms of comfort, cargo space, and performance at higher speeds. There is room for improvement, but Mitsubishi has most of the basics right on the money. Disclaimer: Mitsubishi Provided the Eclipse Cross, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas Year: 2018 Make: Mitsubishi Model: Eclipse Cross Trim: SEL S-AWC Engine: Turbocharged 1.5L Direct-Injected Four-Cylinder Driveline: CVT, All-Wheel Drive Horsepower @ RPM: 152 @ 5,550 Torque @ RPM: 184 @ 2,000 Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 25/26/25 Curb Weight: 3,516 lbs Location of Manufacture: Okazaki, Japan Base Price: $27,895 As Tested Price: $32,310 (Includes $995.00 Destination Charge) Options: Touring Package - $2,500.00 Red Diamond Paint - $595.00 Accessory Tonneau Cover - $190.00 Accessory Carpeted Floormats and Portfolio - $135.00
  3. As we got off the on-ramp to I-94, my driving partner realized something. “We’re going the wrong direction.” Instead of going westbound, we were traveling eastbound. We had misread the directions only a few hundred yards from the starting point. Once realizing this, I drove towards the next exit to turn around. A few extra miles wouldn’t hurt either in the vehicle that I was piloting. Mitsubishi had invited a small number of Detroit-based automotive writers to drive the new Eclipse Cross and Outlander PHEV. Which is how I found myself behind the wheel of the Eclipse Cross to begin the drive. This is Mitsubishi’s contender in the hotly contested compact crossover marketplace. The company is hoping the combination of a distinctive design, turbocharged engine, and other features will bring in people into the showroom. My first impression shows some good signs, but there are some quirks that may put off some people. I should note this isn’t going to be a full-blown first drive. I only had about 15 to 20 miles of driving under my belt, while the rest saw me sitting in the passenger seat, proving directions to my partner and exploring various bits of the vehicle. Think of this as the appetizer to hopefully a full review sometime in the future. Mitsubishi’s design team went slightly overboard with the Eclipse Cross’ exterior. Busy would be an understatement considering the various details on display with sharp angles, a fair amount of chrome for the front, and a split-window tailgate. The color really plays a key role in emphasizing the various details. My particular vehicle was finished in white, which helped tone down some of the design. I will give Mitsubishi credit for designing something that stands out from what is becoming a very crowded field. A slight disappointment is the lack of the design flair for the interior. It looks somewhat stale and plain. But Mitsubishi has made an effort to fix some of the weaknesses I highlighted in my Outlander Sport review. Material quality is noticeably better with Mitsubishi using more solid feeling plastics throughout. There are some spots where some soft-touch plastics are used such on the door panels. Build quality is improved with solid thunk when the doors close and tight gaps. One item I sadly did not get the chance to try fully is the 7-inch infotainment system. The base model has the screen integrated into the dash, while LE models and above have the screen sitting above the dash. LE and above also get a touchpad controller to move around the system. I have concerns about the touchpad considering how many problems I have with something similar used in Lexus models. But those who have tried the touchpad say it works very well with quick responses. Power comes from a turbocharged 1.5L four-cylinder punching out 152 horsepower and 184 pound-feet. This is connected to a CVT and routes power to either the front-wheels (only available on the ES) or Mitsubishi’s Super All-Wheel Control. The engine feels quite adequate as it provides decent oomph when leaving a stop or needing to getting up to speed with traffic. One item I did find odd was the slight delay of the powertrain responding after suddenly stepping on the accelerator hard. Not sure if this is an engine programming issue or something to do with the CVT. The suspension does a surprising job of ironing out most bumps and imperfections. There is a tradeoff as the Eclipse Cross has some significant body roll when cornering. Disclaimer: Mitsubishi provided breakfast, a quick snack, and the Eclipse Cross for this first drive event. Year: 2018 Make: Mitsubishi Model: Eclipse Cross Engine: Turbocharged 1.5L MIVEC Direct-Injected Inline-Four Driveline: Front or All-Wheel Drive, CVT Horsepower @ RPM: 152 @ 6,000 Torque @ RPM: 184 @ 3,500 Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 26/29/27 (ES FWD), 25/26/28 (ES S-AWC), 25/26/25 (LE, SE, and SEL S-AWC) Curb Weight: 3,307 - 3,516 lbs Location of Manufacture: Kurashiki, Okayama, Japan Base Price: $23,295 - $30,395 (Doesn't include a $995 destination charge)
  4. As we got off the on-ramp to I-94, my driving partner realized something. “We’re going the wrong direction.” Instead of going westbound, we were traveling eastbound. We had misread the directions only a few hundred yards from the starting point. Once realizing this, I drove towards the next exit to turn around. A few extra miles wouldn’t hurt either in the vehicle that I was piloting. Mitsubishi had invited a small number of Detroit-based automotive writers to drive the new Eclipse Cross and Outlander PHEV. Which is how I found myself behind the wheel of the Eclipse Cross to begin the drive. This is Mitsubishi’s contender in the hotly contested compact crossover marketplace. The company is hoping the combination of a distinctive design, turbocharged engine, and other features will bring in people into the showroom. My first impression shows some good signs, but there are some quirks that may put off some people. I should note this isn’t going to be a full-blown first drive. I only had about 15 to 20 miles of driving under my belt, while the rest saw me sitting in the passenger seat, proving directions to my partner and exploring various bits of the vehicle. Think of this as the appetizer to hopefully a full review sometime in the future. Mitsubishi’s design team went slightly overboard with the Eclipse Cross’ exterior. Busy would be an understatement considering the various details on display with sharp angles, a fair amount of chrome for the front, and a split-window tailgate. The color really plays a key role in emphasizing the various details. My particular vehicle was finished in white, which helped tone down some of the design. I will give Mitsubishi credit for designing something that stands out from what is becoming a very crowded field. A slight disappointment is the lack of the design flair for the interior. It looks somewhat stale and plain. But Mitsubishi has made an effort to fix some of the weaknesses I highlighted in my Outlander Sport review. Material quality is noticeably better with Mitsubishi using more solid feeling plastics throughout. There are some spots where some soft-touch plastics are used such on the door panels. Build quality is improved with solid thunk when the doors close and tight gaps. One item I sadly did not get the chance to try fully is the 7-inch infotainment system. The base model has the screen integrated into the dash, while LE models and above have the screen sitting above the dash. LE and above also get a touchpad controller to move around the system. I have concerns about the touchpad considering how many problems I have with something similar used in Lexus models. But those who have tried the touchpad say it works very well with quick responses. Power comes from a turbocharged 1.5L four-cylinder punching out 152 horsepower and 184 pound-feet. This is connected to a CVT and routes power to either the front-wheels (only available on the ES) or Mitsubishi’s Super All-Wheel Control. The engine feels quite adequate as it provides decent oomph when leaving a stop or needing to getting up to speed with traffic. One item I did find odd was the slight delay of the powertrain responding after suddenly stepping on the accelerator hard. Not sure if this is an engine programming issue or something to do with the CVT. The suspension does a surprising job of ironing out most bumps and imperfections. There is a tradeoff as the Eclipse Cross has some significant body roll when cornering. Disclaimer: Mitsubishi provided breakfast, a quick snack, and the Eclipse Cross for this first drive event. Year: 2018 Make: Mitsubishi Model: Eclipse Cross Engine: Turbocharged 1.5L MIVEC Direct-Injected Inline-Four Driveline: Front or All-Wheel Drive, CVT Horsepower @ RPM: 152 @ 6,000 Torque @ RPM: 184 @ 3,500 Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 26/29/27 (ES FWD), 25/26/28 (ES S-AWC), 25/26/25 (LE, SE, and SEL S-AWC) Curb Weight: 3,307 - 3,516 lbs Location of Manufacture: Kurashiki, Okayama, Japan Base Price: $23,295 - $30,395 (Doesn't include a $995 destination charge) View full article

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