Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Flybrian

Alliance of Auto Mfgrs call for more 'rational' CAFE rule

6 posts in this topic

Carmaker group backs House fuel-saving plan
Toyota, Big 3 alliance call proposed 32 mpg for vehicles "rational" hike in gas economy rule
Posted Image
Ken Thomas | Associated Press | Link to Original Article @ DetNews


WASHINGTON -- A key auto industry group on Monday endorsed a House proposal to increase gas mileage standards for new passenger vehicles to at least 32 miles per gallon by 2022, calling it a more reasonable approach than a Senate plan approved last month.

The Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers, which represents General Motors Corp., Ford Motor Co., Toyota Motor Corp. and DaimlerChrysler AG, said it would build support for the plan to require cars and trucks to get more on a gallon of gasoline. The group opposes a competing measure that would demand 35 mpg for new vehicles by 2018.

"This is a rational increase in fuel economy and it's one that's going to help a cross-section of consumers but at the same time it's an achievable result," said Auto Alliance president Dave McCurdy.

Reps. Baron Hill, D-Ind., and Lee Terry, R-Neb., last week proposed increasing the so-called CAFE standards to up to 35 mpg by 2022 -- or a minimum of 32 mpg. But their system would keep separate requirements for passenger cars and trucks while seeking more modest gains than a House alternative and the proposal passed by the Senate.

The Senate approved legislation in June that would require the auto industry to meet a combined standard of 35 mpg by 2020.

The auto industry has said it would severely harm manufacturers and force them to reduce the variety of large vehicles offered to consumers.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Carmaker group backs House fuel-saving plan

Toyota, Big 3 alliance call proposed 32 mpg for vehicles "rational" hike in gas economy rule

Posted Image

Ken Thomas | Associated Press | Link to Original Article @ DetNews

WASHINGTON -- A key auto industry group on Monday endorsed a House proposal to increase gas mileage standards for new passenger vehicles to at least 32 miles per gallon by 2022, calling it a more reasonable approach than a Senate plan approved last month.

The Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers, which represents General Motors Corp., Ford Motor Co., Toyota Motor Corp. and DaimlerChrysler AG, said it would build support for the plan to require cars and trucks to get more on a gallon of gasoline. The group opposes a competing measure that would demand 35 mpg for new vehicles by 2018.

"This is a rational increase in fuel economy and it's one that's going to help a cross-section of consumers but at the same time it's an achievable result," said Auto Alliance president Dave McCurdy.

Reps. Baron Hill, D-Ind., and Lee Terry, R-Neb., last week proposed increasing the so-called CAFE standards to up to 35 mpg by 2022 -- or a minimum of 32 mpg. But their system would keep separate requirements for passenger cars and trucks while seeking more modest gains than a House alternative and the proposal passed by the Senate.

The Senate approved legislation in June that would require the auto industry to meet a combined standard of 35 mpg by 2020.

The auto industry has said it would severely harm manufacturers and force them to reduce the variety of large vehicles offered to consumers.

i think this is more acceptable... but the price of vehicles will dramatically skyrocket if this is to be met and hp will remain... we can always go back to the 140 hp v8's...

ohh god... how that would make the 4th gen f-body a classic if power were to decrease in such a fashion...

=)

the corvette could get 32 mpg if the lowered the hp rating a little and gave it a little bit better technology...

hell some people get that already on the manual transmission corvettes...

and if the corvette can get it, so should large sedans with lots less power...

but with direct injection, diesel cars, vvt, afm, the volt, 2 mode hybrid systems, 6-7 speed transmissions, more manual transmissions, and maybe a few other goodies i left out, should be able to boost all of gm's line up of cars to receive an average of 32 mpg

and with 15 years to generate some steam we should have the fuel cell... and some better technology, in the 60's if they could dream of a 505 hp vehicle getting 26 mpg on the highway they would have thought you were mad, they'd think of the viper and say, yah... thats how you do it... with like 13 mpg...

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your so right who would have though 505hp and 26mpg. You must keep in mind cars like the Z06 are very light and sedans like say an STS are heavier by a significant amount.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't understand what the big deal is. Thirty years ago, vehicles were going in the right direction, forced to by OPEC. Weights dropped, horsepower dropped, innovative technology was explored (fuel injection became commonplace, for example) and fuel mileage improved. A mid-80s K-car could get 30 mpg, but of course had anemic performance, which is shunned on C&G, naturally. :huh:

Manufacturers can do this. Consumers will get used to it. I doubt it will be all that painful. If countries like Brazil can do this, with their meager resources, then why can't we? The past 15 years we have seen an explosion in horsepower and weight, which is contrary to what was happening in the '70s and '80s. Where did we suddenly get the idea that we were awash in $10 a barrel oil?

I don't think anybody wants to see a return to the lines and shortages of the '70s, so let's make this work before some crackpot in Iran or Venezuela forces it on us.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a thought. GM is supposed to have the Volt ready by 2011, right? What if they put a Volt system (or something like it) on the majority of their vehicles? How to do you evaluate the mpg of a car that doesn't use gas for the first 40 miles?

I know that's simplistic and there are a million reasons why that won't happen, but my point is, there are 15 years until this takes place. Given the number of technologies being explored, will gas mpg even be a relevant standard by then?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a thought. GM is supposed to have the Volt ready by 2011, right? What if they put a Volt system (or something like it) on the majority of their vehicles? How to do you evaluate the mpg of a car that doesn't use gas for the first 40 miles?

I know that's simplistic and there are a million reasons why that won't happen, but my point is, there are 15 years until this takes place. Given the number of technologies being explored, will gas mpg even be a relevant standard by then?

Hopefully, it won't be relevant. Alternative fuels, along with other technologies may make this argument moot.

The knuckleheads in D.C. are too backward to see that pushing these technologies is a more logical and beneficial approach.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

Guest
You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
Reply to this topic...

×   You have pasted content with formatting.   Remove formatting

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0