Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Oracle of Delphi

GM seeks a green jolt with a green Volt

8 posts in this topic

Automaker racing to get first plug-in hybrid on the market by 2010

Posted Image

DETROIT - General Motors already has five hybrid vehicles on the road, but it is banking its future on a radical departure onto the green road: By 2010, the automaker hopes to have a plug-in electric passenger car in customers' driveways.

I love delivering the unexpected. And right now, the unexpected is a General Motors vehicle that uses no fuel,” said Bob Lutz, GM's vice chairman of product development, who introduced the Chevrolet Volt concept car to enormous attention in January at the North American International Automotive Show in Detroit.

For Lutz, who was brought out of retirement six years ago to rethink GM's product line, the Volt is quite a turnaround. Better known as the father of the high-powered gas-guzzling Dodge Viper, Lutz, 75, once dismissed Toyota's gas-electric hybrid Prius as a publicity stunt.

But now U.S. automakers, who just five years ago were pushing behemoths like the Hummer, find themselves racing to catch up with Japan to put fuel-efficient and environmentally friendly “green” cars on the road. Today, 90 percent of all hybrids sold in the United States are Japanese, and half of them are Priuses.

In response, GM has cut more than $7 billion in annual costs, shed more than 34,000 hourly workers and rolled out more than 20 new models in the last two years in an attempt to regain sales lost to Asian competitors.

Article continues: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/19938313/

Edited by Pontiac Custom-S
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bob was right about the Prius.

The value of getting the Volt to market is incalculable to GM.

The triumph of substance over Hype?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is turning out to be one of the more interesting contests in the U.S. auto market. Yes, it's important who gets here first. I still think there is a limited market for hybrids and every day that one is on the market without the other, the market for the latter gets smaller.

I also think it will be interesting to see how the marketing of these vehicles will play out. So far, word out of Toyota has circled around the 100+ mpg argument, whereas GM is opting for the "no fuel used" (within a 40 mile range) argument. Which one will resonate with customers better?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No gas would seem more logical. I will not be buying a Volt but if it lures in greenies, go for it!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would actually consider one depending on price.. then I can justify getting a project car that will be pushing out 1000+ hp and 8mpg 8)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is turning out to be one of the more interesting contests in the U.S. auto market. Yes, it's important who gets here first. I still think there is a limited market for hybrids and every day that one is on the market without the other, the market for the latter gets smaller.

I also think it will be interesting to see how the marketing of these vehicles will play out. So far, word out of Toyota has circled around the 100+ mpg argument, whereas GM is opting for the "no fuel used" (within a 40 mile range) argument. Which one will resonate with customers better?

Sure is an interesting race, and it seems to me, that GM has something up their corporate sleeve they aren't telling us yet. All of the press releases about the Volt just ooze cinfidence, and coming from conservative GM, that gives me pause.

One thing though, calling the Volt a hybrid seems really inaccurate to me. The car is really in another class altogether - a superior one.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is turning out to be one of the more interesting contests in the U.S. auto market. Yes, it's important who gets here first. I still think there is a limited market for hybrids and every day that one is on the market without the other, the market for the latter gets smaller.

I also think it will be interesting to see how the marketing of these vehicles will play out. So far, word out of Toyota has circled around the 100+ mpg argument, whereas GM is opting for the "no fuel used" (within a 40 mile range) argument. Which one will resonate with customers better?

Sure is an interesting race, and it seems to me, that GM has something up their corporate sleeve they aren't telling us yet. All of the press releases about the Volt just ooze cinfidence, and coming from conservative GM, that gives me pause.

One thing though, calling the Volt a hybrid seems really inaccurate to me. The car is really in another class altogether - a superior one.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sure is an interesting race, and it seems to me, that GM has something up their corporate sleeve they aren't telling us yet. All of the press releases about the Volt just ooze cinfidence, and coming from conservative GM, that gives me pause.

One thing though, calling the Volt a hybrid seems really inaccurate to me. The car is really in another class altogether - a superior one.

I may buy it as a work car, since I only work 8 miles from home, well that is if I'm not working from home. :AH-HA_wink:

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

Guest
You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
Reply to this topic...

×   You have pasted content with formatting.   Remove formatting

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0