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SAmadei

Grindy, but no start

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I have to move the '69 Firebird. It has a fairly worn Chevy 350. About six years ago I last attempted to start it and was unsuccessful. At that time it had sat for about 2 years. Now it hasn't been attempted to start in about 6 years. I checked my fluids, poured some gas in the carb and put a battery on it, and even with a good battery, I'm getting nowhere.

The engine does turn over... slowly... but it sounds nasty... a deep, dry, grinding. Normally, I would panic, but I recall a different, worn, engine which sounded similar (father's worn 350 Chevy Cubevan) until I got enough juice into the starter... at which point it fired up and ran.

Is this grinding the bearings rubbing while dry? I don't want to ruin the engine, but it would be a small loss... its so worn its time for a rebuild... for some other car... this Firebird is getting a Pontiac 400 with a cut down 455 crank that is sitting in the garage right now. Right now, I'd like to get it started... what else could be grinding?

I've obviously gotten spoiled on fuel injection (even though I hate the throttle response on fuel injection), as I like the idea of something starting on the first crank after sitting for years. Both the Firebird and my '81 Bonneville need to move and are proving stubborn after sitting.

BTW, I know I need to check for spark next, but these are at my other place and I didn't bring my timing light (to detect spark... I don't like doing the spark test where I purposely electricute myself), I'm just wondering if I should continue to turn the engine, causing more possible damage.

Edited by SAmadei
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I have to move the '69 Firebird. It has a fairly worn Chevy 350. About six years ago I last attempted to start it and was unsuccessful. At that time it had sat for about 2 years. Now it hasn't been attempted to start in about 6 years. I checked my fluids, poured some gas in the carb and put a battery on it, and even with a good battery, I'm getting nowhere.

The engine does turn over... slowly... but it sounds nasty... a deep, dry, grinding. Normally, I would panic, but I recall a different, worn, engine which sounded similar (father's worn 350 Chevy Cubevan) until I got enough juice into the starter... at which point it fired up and ran.

Is this grinding the bearings rubbing while dry? I don't want to ruin the engine, but it would be a small loss... its so worn its time for a rebuild... for some other car... this Firebird is getting a Pontiac 400 with a cut down 455 crank that is sitting in the garage right now. Right now, I'd like to get it started... what else could be grinding?

I've obviously gotten spoiled on fuel injection (even though I hate the throttle response on fuel injection), as I like the idea of something starting on the first crank after sitting for years. Both the Firebird and my '81 Bonneville need to move and are proving stubborn after sitting.

BTW, I know I need to check for spark next, but these are at my other place and I didn't bring my timing light (to detect spark...

I don't like doing the spark test where I purposely electricute myself)

, I'm just wondering if I should continue to turn the engine, causing more possible damage.

Then I would hazard a guess that you wouldn't care for the fuel pump test that requires removing the fuel line, where it enters the carb, and cranking the motor, with a live coil firing under-the hood, and pumping gas into a one gallon milk jug, seeing it burst into lively flames, which lick at your exposed skin.

I foolishly indulged this trial 31 years ago. I was fortunate to not have been flambe'ed where I stood.

The culprit was finally found to be a defective (cooked by under hood heat) ignition module. From that point on I carried a spare.

The vehicle was a 1975 Ford Gran Torino.

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