SAmadei

Members
  • Content count

    3,836
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    27

SAmadei last won the day on April 8 2014

SAmadei had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

224 #winning

About SAmadei

  • Rank
    Denali Member

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Jersey
  1. 2010 G6 Production

    I wasn't in love with the G6, as most of them are awkward looking sedans... but compared to a lot of newer cars, even the sedan looks better and better to me. I actually like the coupe and convertible versions... I just missed picking up a convertible... and now I'm looking at one that is "rear ended" but in actuality, the convertible mechanism is screwed up... but its too far away to act on. As for the salvage project, I hope to have it driving around the yard next week... maybe wait another week to see if the right parts pop up. If not, I'm starting to consider putting a mild body kit on it... as its about the same price as the correct 2010 parts. I'm just not sure how the body kit will enhance or detract from its resale value. I figure that the car is going to cost me $1600 to get done... and I was hoping to net about $1500~2000... but that might be tough to get considering the mileage (125K) on a base level car. Depending on your source, book value is a tick under $5K, but the salvage brand cuts into that quite a bit... I'm hoping that documenting the repair will help convince any potential buyer that the car wasn't seriously damaged. Who knows. Stephen
  2. 2010 G6 Production

    So, I've figured out why this car was totaled out. No way to return it economically to original specs using GM parts because most of the parts changed during the 2009.5 refresh are fairly hard to find. Even the headlights assemblies are slightly different, as GM changed the amber turn signal lenses into clear ones. Really sucks since I had a line on a complete parts car in the right color... but it sold before I could get there with cash in hand. I have a feeling I'm about to use older parts. Stephen
  3. 2010 G6 Production

    Wiki and GM seem to mark the last G6 as produced in early 2010. I suspect that the penultimate G6 was produced and was featured on the newswire... and then later it turned out that some G3s were built in Mexico in Dec 2009. Since GM didn't want the final Pontiac being built in Mexico, they cranked up the assembly line for one more car in 2010. My G6 is made with parts dated Sep-Nov 2009. Stephen
  4. 2010 G6 Production

    Looking through the old sales tickers, I was unable to determine a breakout of 2010 vs 2009 G6s... I heard the only Pontiac G6 made in actual 2010 was the Final Pontiac... also there was news back then of holdover fleet sales and a reported 100 2010 G6s needed for a fleet order which were built in the tail end of 2009. After all the smoke has cleared, do we have any idea how many 2010 G6s were actually made? Why? I just bought one. Its salvage, but I'm rebuilding it... pretty easy fix... probably a flip as its too damn small for me to drive. I suspect it may have been a rental. Just curious of its curiosity value. Stephen
  5. Question: Tire Pressure 'Energy' Parallels?

    I would convert to joules (1 foot pounds = 1.355 joules) and see if anything in this list is "lay-man" enough... though, I'll admit a lot of whats in the list is not really applicable... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orders_of_magnitude_(energy)
  6. I drive with the gas, not the brake... I've never had a problem with brake temperatures and DOT3 is what the car had... and its cheaper. Dexcool was supposedly better, too... but its been removed from most of my cars because it seems to be better at rotting the cooling system. Anyway, I'd be pulling the same amount as if I was evacuating the AC system... they go surprisingly low. Brake system has a smaller volume as the AC. While you never get a perfect vacuum, even at near vacuum, a lot of liquids' boiling points drop real fast. I wish I could find a phase diagram for brake fluid or polyethylene glycol... but most searches give me ethylene glycol.
  7. Maybe I need to be a bit more clear. Unless someone knows better, manufacturers "install" brake fluid by using a vacuum pump on the master cylinder... pull a vacuum, switch to brake fluid... vacuum pulls brake fluid into system, air-free. No other part of the system is touched. I could easily build such a tool, however, my brake system has brake fluid and, most likely, air behind some of that brake fluid. In a vacuum, most liquids will boil off and get sucked out... but I don't know if DOT3 will. If it does not, would a vacuum pull the air which is behind the brake fluid? Does anyone know what would happen to brake fluid in a vacuum? What I really need is some glassware that can withstand a vacuum... so I can see what happens. What I like, though, is if the DOT3 _does_ boil off, it would be possible to use such a tool to flush the system by removing old fluid.
  8. I've used several of these and they never work perfectly right for me... usually leaking or the plastic parts wear out quickly. Granted, I have not used the top end kits. Also, reverse bleeding is reported to potentially damage seals and it seems to me that it would trap air in the master cylinder... which is why it needs bench bleeding in the first place. This is not what I had in mind... what I have in mind would not require touching anything but the master cylinder.
  9. "That's Not a Buick" Ad Campaign a Success?

    Buick is the brand that is surprising people. Not surprising me. Really? It doesn't suprise you that they are "Not your father's Buick" anymore? My father never bought a Buick... and never would have bought a modern one. Dad liked RWD and would have had about the same problems getting into and driving a modern Buick as I do. It doesn't surprise me that they are still the "Anonymous Brand Chasing Lexus". As far as the tagline "Not your father's Oldsmobile" goes... that was certainly and unfortunately true 15 years ago since my father installed the engine in the family Cutlass Supreme... and it left stripes on the pavement when you hit the faster pedal.
  10. So... I've been working on a lot of brake lines... basically, I have two cars which have required nearly complete brake line replacements. Unfortunately, in order to adapt and fit new lines in a car without taking it completely apart, you use unions... and in retrospect, I seem to have gotten some unions that do not seal well... so I've had several cycles of bleed brakes - observe leak - take apart everything and tighten fitting - rinse and repeat. In any case, I hate doing any work to the car that I cannot do solo... and the one man bleeding solutions out there just suck. This got me to thinking... How do manufacturers "install" brake fluid? Its obvious that GM is not bench bleeding master cylinders and then two-manning a full system bleeding. After some research, it appears that manufacturers do something akin to how they "install" refridgerant... they pull a vacuum then switch over to a source of brake fluid... letting the brake fluid suck into the system without any air being introduced. So I got to thinking about this and I figure this would not be difficult to implement at home... except for the fact that your system already has some old brake fluid in it. In AC systems, when you pull a vacuum, all the refridgerant, oils, water, etc. boil off and is pumped out by the vacuum pump. My question is what would happen if you did this to a brake system? Would the brake fluid boil off? If the brake fluid did not boil off, would the air beyond the brake fluid get pumped out? If the brake fluid boils off, would it condense once outside the vacuum pump? Thoughts?
  11. "That's Not a Buick" Ad Campaign a Success?

    Buick is the brand that is surprising people. Not surprising me.
  12. The new front end isn't doing anything special for me... the old one was fine. OTOH, I wish GM would have changed the ugly Tahoe/Suburban front end. It would have looked so much better with the Silverado front. If I ever end up with a current Tahoe/Suburban, I'll have to have Leepu graft the Silverado nose on it. ;-)
  13. Vehicle : 1940 Ford C.O.E.

    1.5hrs... not bad. I did the same thing back in 1994ish... probably 2.5~3 hrs beforeI gave up... I got through most of the tire, but couldn't cut the steel going through the bead with the tools I had. I would try the tires and just keep an eye on them. I had some 20 year old bias tires tires I used a for a short time once and they held up pretty good... with no tubes, even. I probably don't even want to think about the bias tires on the big trailer right now... they are probably over 20 years old. I thought using tubes in tires was illegal in NJ... or are these designed for that?
  14. Vehicle : 1940 Ford C.O.E.

    Rebuilt a couple 2BBLs and a couple Quadrajets, and some small engine carbs, including several that really was too far gone. I'm amazed how much one can do, as far as bushings and repairs go.
  15. Trivia Tuesday, April 7 2015

    This smells like an AMC innovation. I'm going to say its an early to mid '60s Rambler.