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Tesla Sued, Insane Mode not Insane Enough!

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Gizmodo reports Tesla is being sued by 127 people in Norway cause Insane mode is not insane enough.

http://gizmodo.com/telsa-sued-because-insane-mode-not-insane-enough-1786893579

Pretty interesting reading, clearly buying the P85D with insane mode is understandably not as insane as a P90D or P100D. Guess these people have more money than brains.

 

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36 minutes ago, dfelt said:

Gizmodo reports Tesla is being sued by 127 people in Norway cause Insane mode is not insane enough.

http://gizmodo.com/telsa-sued-because-insane-mode-not-insane-enough-1786893579

Pretty interesting reading, clearly buying the P85D with insane mode is understandably not as insane as a P90D or P100D. Guess these people have more money than brains.

 

Unreal in that the p85 and p90 have been beating Hellcats on drag-strips.  How insane is insane?

 

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20 minutes ago, A Horse With No Name said:

Unreal in that the p85 and p90 have been beating Hellcats on drag-strips.  How insane is insane?

Interesting is that in the lawsuite it states they cannot get the car to hit the stated 0-60 time of 3.3 seconds, they only get 3.5 seconds proving insane mode is not insane.

:dizzy:

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56 minutes ago, dfelt said:

Interesting is that in the lawsuite it states they cannot get the car to hit the stated 0-60 time of 3.3 seconds, they only get 3.5 seconds proving insane mode is not insane.

:dizzy:

Maybe they need to lose a few pounds...

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Ford had a lawsuit on the Cobras back in about 1998 when they actually had to bump the horsepower up to match what was advertised.

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23 minutes ago, Drew Dowdell said:

Maybe they need to lose a few pounds...

:roflmao: +1

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