• Sign in to follow this  
    Followers 0

    As the Diesel Emits: Continental CEO Says Volkswagen's Diesel Mess Could End Diesel Cars In the U.S.


    • The CEO of Continental AG says Volkswagen Diesel Scandal could kill the diesel market in a few countries

    Continental AG's CEO says the diesel scandal that Volkswagen finds itself embroiled in could kill the marketplace for diesel vehicles in China, Japan, and United States.

     

    Elmar Degenhart tells German publication Boersen-Zeitung, "The diesel passenger car could sooner or later disappear from these markets."

     

    Degenhart also revealed that diesel had a market share of only 1 to 3 percent in these countries. This pales in comparison to Europe where diesels make up 53 percent of the market.

     

    Interestingly, the diesel scandal hasn't affected sales of diesel vehicles in Europe or the U.S. according to Continental's finance chief last month.

     

    Source: Boersen-Zeitung via Reuters

    0


      Report Article
    Sign in to follow this  
    Followers 0


    User Feedback


    I think governments such as China, Japan and the US will use this to push for Volt type auto's and long range Electrics. This equals the death of Diesel cars.

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    With gasoline engines soon launching with 40% efficiency, and continued development in the works for 45% after that.....governments won't need to do anything.  It is the customer who has spoken by not wanting Diesel today, and who will again speak louder yet when that efficiency comes out in the near future.  So smooth, quiet, clean and efficient as well as torquey as well as cheaper.....will be hard to ignore.  Hybrids will benefit as well.  No need for pricier PHEV.

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    With gasoline engines soon launching with 40% efficiency, and continued development in the works for 45% after that.....governments won't need to do anything.  It is the customer who has spoken by not wanting Diesel today, and who will again speak louder yet when that efficiency comes out in the near future.  So smooth, quiet, clean and efficient as well as torquey as well as cheaper.....will be hard to ignore.  Hybrids will benefit as well.  No need for pricier PHEV.

     

    I'm not questioning this logic, but I am questioning why diesels cannot have the same or similar gains in efficiency?

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

     

    With gasoline engines soon launching with 40% efficiency, and continued development in the works for 45% after that.....governments won't need to do anything.  It is the customer who has spoken by not wanting Diesel today, and who will again speak louder yet when that efficiency comes out in the near future.  So smooth, quiet, clean and efficient as well as torquey as well as cheaper.....will be hard to ignore.  Hybrids will benefit as well.  No need for pricier PHEV.

     

    I'm not questioning this logic, but I am questioning why diesels cannot have the same or similar gains in efficiency?

     

     

    Part of that answer has to do with the fact that gasoline is sort of becoming or borrowing from Diesel.  Specifically higher combustion pressures, higher CR's and direct injection and even boosting.  So I think there is more room to move with gas. Smarter cam development is currently being understood with all these new gasoline tuning knobs as well. And although Diesel has not yet hit a wall with it's development, it is still a dirty combustion process that needs expensive compensation to bring down to a tolerable level.  And you are still stuck with more NVH and smell and cost than gas, hence my prognostication.

     

    DIesel has it's use though, for sure.

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Other than trucks, towing and the commercial market, you see many people not happy with the dirty fuel of Diesel at the pump. It is a turnoff for many.

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

     

     

    With gasoline engines soon launching with 40% efficiency, and continued development in the works for 45% after that.....governments won't need to do anything.  It is the customer who has spoken by not wanting Diesel today, and who will again speak louder yet when that efficiency comes out in the near future.  So smooth, quiet, clean and efficient as well as torquey as well as cheaper.....will be hard to ignore.  Hybrids will benefit as well.  No need for pricier PHEV.

     

    I'm not questioning this logic, but I am questioning why diesels cannot have the same or similar gains in efficiency?

     

     

    Part of that answer has to do with the fact that gasoline is sort of becoming or borrowing from Diesel.  Specifically higher combustion pressures, higher CR's and direct injection and even boosting.  So I think there is more room to move with gas. Smarter cam development is currently being understood with all these new gasoline tuning knobs as well. And although Diesel has not yet hit a wall with it's development, it is still a dirty combustion process that needs expensive compensation to bring down to a tolerable level.  And you are still stuck with more NVH and smell and cost than gas, hence my prognostication.

     

    DIesel has it's use though, for sure.

     

     

    Gasoline tuning knobs?!  :blink:  :blink:

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I could see cng making those gains because of the octane rating of it being able to support the approximate 18 to 1 that in theory cng could burn at without explosion. Then again there is the matter of the 10% advantage that diesel has over gasoline. Diesel will always make more torque and with governments(all) regulations cars will continue to gain weight.

     

    Alas as battery tech gets better and more are built the cost advantage that the ice powered vehicals have now will evaporate as will its marketshare

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

    Guest
    You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
    Add a comment...

    ×   You have pasted content with formatting.   Remove formatting

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    Loading...



  • Popular Stories

  • Similar Content

    • By William Maley
      It has been a mixed few days at Audi. Last Friday, sources told Reuters that no evidence was found that Audi CEO Rupert Stadler knew about the illegal cheating software. Stadler was questioned earlier in the week by U.S. law firm Jones Day - the group brought in by Volkswagen to conduct an internal investigation. Stadler's questioning came around the same time as media reports saying that Audi was more entangled in the diesel emission scandal than previously thought.
      "Nothing burdensome against Stadler was found," said a source.
      Then on Monday, Audi's r&d head Stefan Knirsch stepped down from his post and left the company. As we reported last week , Knirsch reportedly knew about the illegal software and lied about under oath during an internal investigation. At the time, Knirsch was going to be suspended. In a statement, Audi said Knirsch would be leaving immediately. The company did not say the reason for his departure or who would take his place.
      Source: Reuters, 2

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      It has been a mixed few days at Audi. Last Friday, sources told Reuters that no evidence was found that Audi CEO Rupert Stadler knew about the illegal cheating software. Stadler was questioned earlier in the week by U.S. law firm Jones Day - the group brought in by Volkswagen to conduct an internal investigation. Stadler's questioning came around the same time as media reports saying that Audi was more entangled in the diesel emission scandal than previously thought.
      "Nothing burdensome against Stadler was found," said a source.
      Then on Monday, Audi's r&d head Stefan Knirsch stepped down from his post and left the company. As we reported last week , Knirsch reportedly knew about the illegal software and lied about under oath during an internal investigation. At the time, Knirsch was going to be suspended. In a statement, Audi said Knirsch would be leaving immediately. The company did not say the reason for his departure or who would take his place.
      Source: Reuters, 2
    • By William Maley
      If there is one bright spot in Volkswagen, it has to be their commercial division. Through August, the division has seen sales increase 8.2 percent to 308,500 models. With their success, it should come as no surprise they are considering moving into other markets such as the U.S.
      Eckhard Scholz, Volkswagen's commercial vehicles division CEO tells Reuters that the United States "are still a highly interesting market." A lot of this comes from many commercial vehicle manufacturers operating in the U.S. are taking ideas from their European counterparts. But when asked about possibly selling vehicles in the U.S., Scholz said,
      "A lot of things come to mind but at the moment I have nothing concrete to say."
      Volkswagen's commercial division handles the Caddy, Transporter, and Crafter vans, along with the Amarok pickup. 
      This isn't the first time that Volkswagen has considered bringing over some of their commercial vehicles. Last year, then CEO of Volkswagen of America, Michael Horn said the automaker was looking at possibly bringing over one of their vans into the U.S.
      But there is a big elephant in the room; the diesel emission scandal. A fair number of commercial vehicle buyers like diesel engines for fuel economy and the ability to handle heavy loads. But Volkswagen may have a very difficult time trying to get diesel engines certified in the U.S. They might have to go with gas engines for the time being which could limit their appeal. 
      Source: Reuters

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      If there is one bright spot in Volkswagen, it has to be their commercial division. Through August, the division has seen sales increase 8.2 percent to 308,500 models. With their success, it should come as no surprise they are considering moving into other markets such as the U.S.
      Eckhard Scholz, Volkswagen's commercial vehicles division CEO tells Reuters that the United States "are still a highly interesting market." A lot of this comes from many commercial vehicle manufacturers operating in the U.S. are taking ideas from their European counterparts. But when asked about possibly selling vehicles in the U.S., Scholz said,
      "A lot of things come to mind but at the moment I have nothing concrete to say."
      Volkswagen's commercial division handles the Caddy, Transporter, and Crafter vans, along with the Amarok pickup. 
      This isn't the first time that Volkswagen has considered bringing over some of their commercial vehicles. Last year, then CEO of Volkswagen of America, Michael Horn said the automaker was looking at possibly bringing over one of their vans into the U.S.
      But there is a big elephant in the room; the diesel emission scandal. A fair number of commercial vehicle buyers like diesel engines for fuel economy and the ability to handle heavy loads. But Volkswagen may have a very difficult time trying to get diesel engines certified in the U.S. They might have to go with gas engines for the time being which could limit their appeal. 
      Source: Reuters
    • By William Maley
      There are changes afoot in the Volkswagen Golf family. We'll begin with the bad news, the two-door Golf GTI will be no more in the U.S. Car and Driver was able to confirm this news with Volkswagen. Why? 
      “The trend is clearly shifting toward four-door models,” said Volkswagen of America’s marketing chief, Hendrik Muth.
      Originally, Volkswagen was planning to offer the two-door GTI for 2017, but only in the base S trim. 
      Now for the possible good news, Volkswagen is considering adding all-wheel drive to the standard Golf. During the press launch of the Golf Alltrack, Volkswagen's vice president of product marketing and strategy Dr. Hendrik Muth explained that adding 4Motion to the Puebla, Mexico factory has brought forth new possibilities. The Truth About Cars asked if one of the possibilities was adding all-wheel drive to the standard Golf and Muth answered "Yes".
      Volkswagen wants to give Subaru a real challenge in the compact class. The Japanese automaker is the only one that offers all-wheel drive on their standard compact models - Impreza and XV Crosstrek. 
      Source: Car and Driver, The Truth About Cars
      Pic Credit: William Maley for Cheers & Gears

      View full article
  • Recent Status Updates

  • Who's Online (See full list)