• Sign in to follow this  
    Followers 0

    As the Diesel Emits: GM's Powertrain Chief To Push For Global Emission Standard


    • GM's Powertrain Chief Wants To Have A Global Standard for Emissions

    If there is anything the Volkswagen diesel emission scandal has shown us, it has shown the various regulations used around the world are tricky to enforce and that automakers will take advantage of loopholes. General Motors' powertrain chief wants to change that by unifying emission standards around the world.

     

    Dan Nicholson, GM's powertrain chief tells Automotive News that he plans to use his upcoming presidency of the International Federation of Automotive Engineering Societies (Fisita) to push for the unification of emission standards around the world.

     

    “We want all our engineering resources focused on improving air quality and reducing CO2. With different sets of rules, we have to put our engineering resources into nuanced regulatory differences rather than working on the root problem,” said Nicholson.

     

    Nicholson said the differences between emission standards set by the EPA and those upcoming from the European Union are small. But engineering the same vehicle to meet different standards was costing a large sum across the industry.

     

    Harmonizing the different standards will be difficult, but Nicholson says the benefits will outweigh the negatives.

     

    “There is more overlap in the areas of interest than people think,” said Nicholson.

     

    There's also another reason why Nicholson wants to take this on. China is in the process of setting up their own emission standards.

     

    “With China in discussions right now, we are at a key pivot point. I’m concerned that if we miss our opportunities now they won’t come again for a long time,” explained Nicholson.

     

    Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required)

    0


    Sign in to follow this  
    Followers 0


    User Feedback


    We have heard this from other auto companies and now GM, I have to say that the more I think about this and to read that China is now considering an Emissions agency, the world really does need a single standard.

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

    Guest
    You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
    Add a comment...

    ×   You have pasted content with formatting.   Remove formatting

      Only 75 emoticons maximum are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor




  • Popular Stories

  • Today's Birthdays

    1. 94commo
      94commo
      (50 years old)
    2. Aerodynamic
      Aerodynamic
      (30 years old)
    3. LPE427Fbird
      LPE427Fbird
      (42 years old)
  • Similar Content

    • By William Maley
      One question that we have found ourselves wondering is who blew the whistle on the software cheat Volkswagen was using on their TDI models. A new book says it was someone at Volkswagen of America.
      Automotive News got their hands on Faster, Higher, Farther: The Volkswagen Scandal by New York Times reporter Jack Ewing. In the book, Ewing reveals that the head of VW’s Engineering and Environmental Office in the U.S., Stuart Johnson revealed the existence of the cheat to federal authorities. Johnson was the primary contact for the various regulation agencies in the U.S. and would be one of the people on the front lines when the scandal unfolded.
      In the book, CARB deputy executive director Alberto Ayala named Johnson as the person who revealed the existence of Volkswagen's illegal software. This revelation took place prior to a key meeting between CARB and Volkswagen on August 19, 2015. By revealing this information, Johnson was violating orders given by VW's higher ups. This meeting is mentioned in the federal indictment of Oliver Schmidt, a former VW executive who is facing 11 federal charges dealing with the scandal. Johnson is mentioned in the indictment as “Cooperating Witness 1.”
      The indictment also states the witness “has agreed to cooperate with the government’s investigation in exchange for an agreement that the government will not prosecute CW1 in the United States.”
      Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required)

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      One question that we have found ourselves wondering is who blew the whistle on the software cheat Volkswagen was using on their TDI models. A new book says it was someone at Volkswagen of America.
      Automotive News got their hands on Faster, Higher, Farther: The Volkswagen Scandal by New York Times reporter Jack Ewing. In the book, Ewing reveals that the head of VW’s Engineering and Environmental Office in the U.S., Stuart Johnson revealed the existence of the cheat to federal authorities. Johnson was the primary contact for the various regulation agencies in the U.S. and would be one of the people on the front lines when the scandal unfolded.
      In the book, CARB deputy executive director Alberto Ayala named Johnson as the person who revealed the existence of Volkswagen's illegal software. This revelation took place prior to a key meeting between CARB and Volkswagen on August 19, 2015. By revealing this information, Johnson was violating orders given by VW's higher ups. This meeting is mentioned in the federal indictment of Oliver Schmidt, a former VW executive who is facing 11 federal charges dealing with the scandal. Johnson is mentioned in the indictment as “Cooperating Witness 1.”
      The indictment also states the witness “has agreed to cooperate with the government’s investigation in exchange for an agreement that the government will not prosecute CW1 in the United States.”
      Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required)
    • By William Maley
      More good news for Volkswagen as the EPA has finally given the ok for the company to start selling repaired TDI vehicles. Bloomberg has learned from Volkswagen Group of America spokeswoman Jeannine Ginivan that dealers can sell TDI models from the 2015 model year once they have been updated with new software. The fix will also include new hardware for the diesel engine, but dealers don't have to wait for the parts to come in early next year.
      "We are still finalizing the details of this program and will provide more information on its implementation at the appropriate time,” said Ginivan.
      It should be noted this is only a symbolic step as only 67,000 vehicles are eligible for this - 12,000 of which are currently sitting on dealer lots. The big question is whether or not anyone is interested in buying a Volkswagen TDI vehicle considering all of the trouble it has brought.
      Source: Bloomberg

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      More good news for Volkswagen as the EPA has finally given the ok for the company to start selling repaired TDI vehicles. Bloomberg has learned from Volkswagen Group of America spokeswoman Jeannine Ginivan that dealers can sell TDI models from the 2015 model year once they have been updated with new software. The fix will also include new hardware for the diesel engine, but dealers don't have to wait for the parts to come in early next year.
      "We are still finalizing the details of this program and will provide more information on its implementation at the appropriate time,” said Ginivan.
      It should be noted this is only a symbolic step as only 67,000 vehicles are eligible for this - 12,000 of which are currently sitting on dealer lots. The big question is whether or not anyone is interested in buying a Volkswagen TDI vehicle considering all of the trouble it has brought.
      Source: Bloomberg
    • By William Maley
      With Volkswagen buying back a large chunk of the 2.0L TDIs involved the diesel emission scandal, the question arises of where to store them. The answer according to the German automaker is they are storing them at "regional facilities." One of those regional facilities is the parking lot of the Pontiac Silverdome - former home to the Detroit Lions - in Pontiac, MI. However, the vehicles stored there find themselves in a bit of legal trouble.
      The Oakland Press reports that the City of Pontiac has filed a lawsuit against the owners of Silverdome, the Triple Investment Group for numerous violations in zoning, safety, and a municipal code dealing with the storage of vehicles; "a special exemption permit is needed for parking and exterior storage of vehicles." A hearing was planned last week, but was adjourned.
      “Our client is actively engaged and working with the city. We hope to resolve our differences with the city and we believe we are making good progress and working together. We are still waiting on a schedule for (the hearing) but we are hopeful that we will resolve the differences in the meantime and further hearings won’t be necessary,” said J. Patrick Lennon, a partner at Honigman Miller Schwartz and Cohn, the lawfirm representing Triple Investment Group.
      A Volkswagen spokeswoman told Automotive News the company is talking with their “service provider” to see if all of the permits that allow vehicles to be stored at the Silverdome are up to date.
      Source: The Oakland Press, Automotive News (Subscription Required)
      Pic Credit: WXYZ

      View full article
  • Recent Status Updates

  • Who's Online (See full list)