• Sign in to follow this  
    Followers 0

    As the Diesel Emits: GM's Powertrain Chief To Push For Global Emission Standard


    • GM's Powertrain Chief Wants To Have A Global Standard for Emissions

    If there is anything the Volkswagen diesel emission scandal has shown us, it has shown the various regulations used around the world are tricky to enforce and that automakers will take advantage of loopholes. General Motors' powertrain chief wants to change that by unifying emission standards around the world.

     

    Dan Nicholson, GM's powertrain chief tells Automotive News that he plans to use his upcoming presidency of the International Federation of Automotive Engineering Societies (Fisita) to push for the unification of emission standards around the world.

     

    “We want all our engineering resources focused on improving air quality and reducing CO2. With different sets of rules, we have to put our engineering resources into nuanced regulatory differences rather than working on the root problem,” said Nicholson.

     

    Nicholson said the differences between emission standards set by the EPA and those upcoming from the European Union are small. But engineering the same vehicle to meet different standards was costing a large sum across the industry.

     

    Harmonizing the different standards will be difficult, but Nicholson says the benefits will outweigh the negatives.

     

    “There is more overlap in the areas of interest than people think,” said Nicholson.

     

    There's also another reason why Nicholson wants to take this on. China is in the process of setting up their own emission standards.

     

    “With China in discussions right now, we are at a key pivot point. I’m concerned that if we miss our opportunities now they won’t come again for a long time,” explained Nicholson.

     

    Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required)

    0


      Report Article
    Sign in to follow this  
    Followers 0


    User Feedback


    We have heard this from other auto companies and now GM, I have to say that the more I think about this and to read that China is now considering an Emissions agency, the world really does need a single standard.

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

    Guest
    You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
    Add a comment...

    ×   You have pasted content with formatting.   Remove formatting

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    Loading...



  • Popular Stories

  • Today's Birthdays

    1. swgforthefence
      swgforthefence
      (58 years old)
    2. trevormac98
      trevormac98
      (33 years old)
  • Similar Content

    • By William Maley
      It has been a mixed few days at Audi. Last Friday, sources told Reuters that no evidence was found that Audi CEO Rupert Stadler knew about the illegal cheating software. Stadler was questioned earlier in the week by U.S. law firm Jones Day - the group brought in by Volkswagen to conduct an internal investigation. Stadler's questioning came around the same time as media reports saying that Audi was more entangled in the diesel emission scandal than previously thought.
      "Nothing burdensome against Stadler was found," said a source.
      Then on Monday, Audi's r&d head Stefan Knirsch stepped down from his post and left the company. As we reported last week , Knirsch reportedly knew about the illegal software and lied about under oath during an internal investigation. At the time, Knirsch was going to be suspended. In a statement, Audi said Knirsch would be leaving immediately. The company did not say the reason for his departure or who would take his place.
      Source: Reuters, 2

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      It has been a mixed few days at Audi. Last Friday, sources told Reuters that no evidence was found that Audi CEO Rupert Stadler knew about the illegal cheating software. Stadler was questioned earlier in the week by U.S. law firm Jones Day - the group brought in by Volkswagen to conduct an internal investigation. Stadler's questioning came around the same time as media reports saying that Audi was more entangled in the diesel emission scandal than previously thought.
      "Nothing burdensome against Stadler was found," said a source.
      Then on Monday, Audi's r&d head Stefan Knirsch stepped down from his post and left the company. As we reported last week , Knirsch reportedly knew about the illegal software and lied about under oath during an internal investigation. At the time, Knirsch was going to be suspended. In a statement, Audi said Knirsch would be leaving immediately. The company did not say the reason for his departure or who would take his place.
      Source: Reuters, 2
    • By William Maley
      In the neverending saga that is the Volkswagen diesel emission scandal, Audi's head of R&D will be suspended this week due to knowing about the cheat used in the 3.0L TDI V6.
      German newspaper Bild am Sonntag (via Reuters) learned from sources that Stefan Knirsch knew about the software and lied under oath about it during an internal investigation. Bild says Knirsch has been asked to clear his desk. Not surprisingly, Volkswagen, Audi and Audi's works council declined to comment.
      Source: Bild am Sonntag via Reuters

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      In the neverending saga that is the Volkswagen diesel emission scandal, Audi's head of R&D will be suspended this week due to knowing about the cheat used in the 3.0L TDI V6.
      German newspaper Bild am Sonntag (via Reuters) learned from sources that Stefan Knirsch knew about the software and lied under oath about it during an internal investigation. Bild says Knirsch has been asked to clear his desk. Not surprisingly, Volkswagen, Audi and Audi's works council declined to comment.
      Source: Bild am Sonntag via Reuters
    • By William Maley
      The first person has been charged in the U.S.' Volkswagen diesel emission probe. Today at the U.S. Federal Court in Detroit, James Robert Liang, leader of diesel competence for Volkswagen from 2008 until June of this year entered a plea of guilty to conspiracy to defraud the U.S. government, commit wire fraud, and violate the Clean Air Act. 
      According to grand jury indictment filed back in June and unsealed today,  “Liang and his co-conspirators, including current and former employees, and others, agreed to defraud the U.S. and VW customers, and violate the Clean Air Act, by misleading the U.S. and VW customers about whether VW diesel motors complied with U.S. emissions standards,” prosecutors wrote.
      Documents showed Liang was on the team that developed the diesel engine at the center of this scandal, the EA 189 2.0L four-cylinder back in 2006. The team realized that the engine wouldn't meet the strict U.S. standards on nitrogen oxide emissions while also attracting “sufficient customer demand.” Thus the decision was made to develop and install the 'defeat device' software on the EA 189 to pass emission tests. This engine would be installed on various Volkswagen vehicles starting in 2009.
      In 2014, Liang's team would update the software to help cut down on warranty claims. Engineers believed the reason for the increase in claims was due to the vehicle operating with the defeat device on for too long. Around this time, U.S. regulators would begin asking Volkswagen questions about the discrepancies between the amount of emissions being emitted during lab tests and in real-world driving. Various Volkswagen employees either lied when talking with regulators. 
      “I know VW did not disclose the defeat device to U.S. regulators in order to sell the cars in the U.S. That’s what makes me guilty,” said Liang to the court.
      Liang faces up to five years in jail and a fine of up to $250,000 or twice the gross gain or loss. In a plea agreement signed on August 31st, prosecutors say in exchange for his agreement to cooperate with the probe, the U.S. government agrees not to use any new information about Liang’s own criminal conduct during the sentencing hearing expected to take place on January 11th. Liang cooperation could help out in the investigation and shine a light on more people involved.
      When asked for comment, Volkswagen spokeswoman Jeannine Ginivan declined.
      Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required), Bloomberg, The Detroit News

      View full article
  • Recent Status Updates

  • Who's Online (See full list)