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  • William Maley
    William Maley

    Trump Administration To Revisit Self-Driving Guidelines

      A New Presidency Means Changes, Including Guidelines for Self-Driving Vehicles

    Towards the end of Obama presidency, the administration unveiled guidelines for testing and deployment of self-driving cars in the US. But there is a new presidency in the White House and that means things will be changing - although details are scarce as to how.

    U.S. Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao said in Detroit yesterday the Department of Transportation would revisit and revise the guidelines put forth by the previous administration within the next few months.

    "The pressure is mounting for the federal government to do something" about autonomous vehicles, said Chao.

    "We don't want rules that impede future technological advances."

    Chao didn't go into details about the changes that would be made or how it would differ from those made under the Obama presidency.

    The current guidelines introduced last fall includes a 15-point assessment that automakers would use to determine whether an autonomous vehicle was ready to go on the road or not. The assessment includes such items as privacy and validation methods.

    Automakers have voiced concerns on the guidelines, saying it would delay the testing by months and requires them to hand over data.

    Source: Reuters

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    Testing for personal safety is important and I question why the automakers are wanting to not have a standardized set of final testing. Without it, I can see law suits and big problems for companies.

    I really wonder just how much the current administration cares about humanity and the public in comparison to their own lining of their wallet and making a buck at all costs. Things are showing a war of the 1% against the world as I see a push for a global cast system. The future is going to be very interesting.

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