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    Rumorpile: Q50 Eau Rouge Heads To Production


    • Infiniti seems very intent on sending the Q50 Eau Rouge into production

    Infiniti has been making the auto show rounds with their Q50 Eau Rouge concept which previews a possible competitor to the likes of BMW's M and Mercedes-Benz's AMG division. According to a source, the Q50 Eau Rouge concept could become a reality.

    Auto Express learned from a source at the at the Beijing Motor Show that momentum is building for the high performance sedan.

    “At this stage it would take more to stop the car getting made than to start things. There is a real buzz about it,” said the source.

    No word on when a production version of the Q50 Eau Rouge could be shown.

    Source: Auto Express

    William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.com or you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster.

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    Interesting, first I have heard of this car. What is the engine type, spec's any better pictures as until now, I have not heard of this car at all. Must be an inner circle thing that has been buzzing all about it as the public sure has not.

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