• Sign in to follow this  
    Followers 0

    As the Diesel Emits: Did Volkswagen's Managers Know About the Emission Problem in 2014?


    • An uncovered letter casts doubt as to when Volkswagen first knew about the diesel emission problem

    Volkswagen has said time and time again they didn't know about the emission cheating until sometime in 2015. But a new report calls this into question.

     

    German newspaper Bild am Sonntag (via Reuters) reported over the weekend that an employee known internally as "Winterkorn's fireman" notified senior managers - including Volkswagen's CEO at the time Martin Winterkorn - about the U.S. possibly probing some of VW's diesel vehicles for high emission levels back in May of 2014. The letter came from Volkswagen's product quality and safety department.

     

    "It can be assumed that the authorities will investigate VW systems to establish whether Volkswagen has implemented test-recognition software," the letter states.

     

    The letter was uncovered by Jones Day, the law firm conducting the Volkswagen's internal investigation.

     

    Two sources tell Reuters that they knew about the letter, but couldn't say if Winterkorn saw the letter or not.

     

    A Volkswagen spokesman declined to comment.

     

    Source: Bild via Reuters

    0


      Report Article
    Sign in to follow this  
    Followers 0


    User Feedback


    There are no comments to display.



    Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

    Guest
    You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
    Add a comment...

    ×   You have pasted content with formatting.   Remove formatting

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    Loading...



  • Popular Stories

  • Today's Birthdays

    1. BowTieFarmer
      BowTieFarmer
      (57 years old)
    2. will75
      will75
      (41 years old)
  • Similar Content

    • By William Maley
      It has been a mixed few days at Audi. Last Friday, sources told Reuters that no evidence was found that Audi CEO Rupert Stadler knew about the illegal cheating software. Stadler was questioned earlier in the week by U.S. law firm Jones Day - the group brought in by Volkswagen to conduct an internal investigation. Stadler's questioning came around the same time as media reports saying that Audi was more entangled in the diesel emission scandal than previously thought.
      "Nothing burdensome against Stadler was found," said a source.
      Then on Monday, Audi's r&d head Stefan Knirsch stepped down from his post and left the company. As we reported last week , Knirsch reportedly knew about the illegal software and lied about under oath during an internal investigation. At the time, Knirsch was going to be suspended. In a statement, Audi said Knirsch would be leaving immediately. The company did not say the reason for his departure or who would take his place.
      Source: Reuters, 2

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      It has been a mixed few days at Audi. Last Friday, sources told Reuters that no evidence was found that Audi CEO Rupert Stadler knew about the illegal cheating software. Stadler was questioned earlier in the week by U.S. law firm Jones Day - the group brought in by Volkswagen to conduct an internal investigation. Stadler's questioning came around the same time as media reports saying that Audi was more entangled in the diesel emission scandal than previously thought.
      "Nothing burdensome against Stadler was found," said a source.
      Then on Monday, Audi's r&d head Stefan Knirsch stepped down from his post and left the company. As we reported last week , Knirsch reportedly knew about the illegal software and lied about under oath during an internal investigation. At the time, Knirsch was going to be suspended. In a statement, Audi said Knirsch would be leaving immediately. The company did not say the reason for his departure or who would take his place.
      Source: Reuters, 2
    • By William Maley
      In the neverending saga that is the Volkswagen diesel emission scandal, Audi's head of R&D will be suspended this week due to knowing about the cheat used in the 3.0L TDI V6.
      German newspaper Bild am Sonntag (via Reuters) learned from sources that Stefan Knirsch knew about the software and lied under oath about it during an internal investigation. Bild says Knirsch has been asked to clear his desk. Not surprisingly, Volkswagen, Audi and Audi's works council declined to comment.
      Source: Bild am Sonntag via Reuters

      View full article
  • Recent Status Updates

  • Who's Online (See full list)