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    As the Diesel Emits: Kenneth Feinberg Says 'Generous Solution' Is Coming


    • There is a compensation program coming, but when that will be is unknown

    Kenneth Feinberg is still hard at work on developing a compensation plan for TDI owners in the U.S. affected by the diesel emission scandal. But in an interview with German newspaper Frankfurter Allgemeine Sonntagszeitung, Feinberg says "there will be a generous solution."

     

    Now what that solution will end up being is unknown at this time. Part of the problem is Feinberg has his hands tied as Volkswagen and the EPA/CARB are still working on trying to figure out a fix for the 2.0L TDI engine.

     

    "..my hands are tied, while VW and the authorities do not resolve their differences. The original time frame could be delayed, therefore."

     

    The other problem is trying to figure out what an appropriate compensation will look like.

     

    “The jury is still out, and at the moment all options are up for debate: cash payments, buybacks, repairs, replacements with new cars,” said Feinberg.

     

    Not helping matters are the different generations of the engine in question - the EA189. One generation of the engine might have a different program than the other.

     

    Feinberg believes that once the compensation program comes online, most owners will take advantage of it.

     

    "When funds for the victims of September 11, 97 percent of claimants have accepted my offer. If GM and BP were also more than 90 percent. This must also be the target for VW."

     

    Source: Frankfurter Allgemeine Sonntagszeitung, Reuters

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    My friend with a 13 Jetta TDI(6 spd!) got a $500 Visa Prepaid card and $500 towards anything from Volkswagen(gift card as well). 

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