• Sign in to follow this  
    Followers 0

    Review: 2016 Hyundai Tucson Limited AWD


    • Months after our first drive, do we still think the Tucson is one of the best?

    The Hyundai Tucson has never been a real serious threat in the compact crossover segment. It isn’t that Hyundai wasn’t trying. They offered a lot of equipment at a low price and went with a unique design. But even with these traits, the Tucson wasn’t able to make a sizable dent into the compact crossover market where the likes of the Honda CR-V, Ford Escape, and Subaru Forester rule the roost. Hyundai isn’t giving up the fight, though. Last year, they launched the third-generation Tucson to make some inroads in the class. As we said in our first drive back in August, “it may be that the 2016 Hyundai Tucson can be considered one of the best in its class.” Let's see how we feel when we revisit the 2016 Tucson after some time has passed.

     

    To make the Tucson standout in a crowded class, Hyundai has put a lot of effort into the Tucson’s design. There is a fair amount of European influence with sharp lines and an uncluttered look. Hyundai’s trademark elements such as a large hexagonal grille and slim headlights are here. A set of 19-inch alloys on the Limited are designed in such a way that it looks like an airplane propeller. The design work has paid off as the Tucson is one of the sharpest looking models in the class.

     


    2016 Hyundai Tucson Limited AWD 9


    The Tucson’s interior doesn’t have the same flair as the exterior which is quite a shame. Is isn’t to say the interior is bad; there is a good mix of hard and soft materials, and controls are arranged in a logical fashion. But I found myself wishing Hyundai would take a small risk and add something special to the interior.

     

    Our Tucson Limited tester came with leather seats with power adjustments for the front. Comfort and support levels are excellent. In the back, the Tucson offers plenty of head and legroom for most passengers. As we noted in our first drive, the Tucson loses out in cargo space. Open the tailgate and you’ll be greeted with 31 cubic feet. Fold the rear seats and space increases to 61.9. Competitors such as the Honda CR-V (35.2, 70.9 cubic feet), Subaru Forester (34.4, 74.7 cubic feet), and Toyota RAV4 (38.4, 73.4 cubic feet) offer more space.

     

    When it comes to technology, the Tucson Limited does very well. There is an eight-inch touchscreen with the latest version of Hyundai’s infotainment system. We like this system as it is one of the easier systems to use thanks to large touchpoints and buttons under the screen to take you to the various parts of the system. One thing we are slightly disappointed is that you cannot option the larger screen on the Sport trim, which slightly hurts Hyundai’s value argument.

     

    Most Hyundai Tucsons will come equipped with a turbocharged 1.6L four-cylinder producing 175 horsepower and 195 pound-feet of torque. This is paired with a seven-speed dual-clutch automatic and the choice of either front or all-wheel drive. The turbo engine is potent thanks to the torque being available across a wide range (1,500 to 4,500 rpm). This means the Tucson is able to scoot along when you are trying to make a pass or leaving from a stop. The engine is also very refined with very little noise coming into the cabin.

     


    2016 Hyundai Tucson Limited AWD 7


     

    Sadly we cannot say the same about the dual-clutch transmission. Unlike the transmission we tried out on our first drive, the one in our test Tucson had issues of hesitating when leaving a stop and taking its sweet time to downshift whenever we needed to make a pass. At least upshifts were quick and smooth. Now when we turned in our Tucson tester, we learned that Hyundai issued an update for the transmission to fix the hesitation issue. If the Tucson was built before November 17, 2015 - which we suspect ours was - Hyundai’s dealers would perform the update on the vehicle. Tucsons built after November 17th have the update installed.

     

    The Hyundai Tucson Limited AWD is rated by the EPA at 24 City/28 Highway/26 Combined. Our average for the week landed around 26 MPG. Those who want to eek out a few more MPGs should look at the Tucson Eco that comes with some fuel saving tricks such as lighter wheels to improve fuel economy to 26 City/33 Highway/29 Combined for the front-wheel drive model. All-wheel drive models see a small decrease in fuel economy numbers.

     

    One thing that hasn’t changed from our first drive impressions is the Tucson’s ride and handling characteristics. Over Michigan’s terrible roads with endless bumps and potholes, the Tucson’s suspension was able to iron them out and provide a smooth ride. An extraordinary feat when you take into account the Tucson Limited feature a set of 19-inch wheels. Handling is impressive for a Hyundai with little body roll and the vehicle feeling planted. The only item we wished Hyundai would work on is the steering. There is still a slight dead zone when beginning to turn the wheel. At least some weight does appear the further you turn.

     


    2016 Hyundai Tucson Limited AWD 6


     

    It seems Hyundai has mostly hit it out of the park with the new Tucson. Not quite. The big issue for the Tucson is the value argument. Our Limited all-wheel drive came with a base price of $31,300. The as-tested price landed around $34,945 with the Ultimate package that adds HID headlights, ventilated front seats, heated rear seats, lane departure warning, and a panoramic sunroof. This about the average price you would expect for other loaded small crossovers.

     

    It is only when you drop down to other trims that you begin to realize the Tucson isn’t as a great of a value as you might think. For example, the Eco and Sport don’t come with any options. The only items you get to choose are color and whether you want front or all-wheel drive. If you want navigation or dual-zone climate control on the Sport, you’re out of luck.

     

    That isn’t to say there aren't a lot of good things to the Tucson because there are. It stands out with some of the sharpest looks in the class and the turbo engine is one of best we have driven. Hyundai also deserves some kudos for getting the ride and handling balance just right. But the Tucson has a value problem that could drive some folks away, along with a small cargo area for the class.

     

    The 2016 Tucson is good, but it isn’t the slam dunk we thought it was.

     

    Cheers: Exterior design that stands out, turbo engine, nice balance between sport and comfort
    Jeers: Value argument tough to argue on lower trims, small rear cargo area, interior design could use some more flair.

     

    Disclaimer: Hyundai Provided the Tuscon, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas

     

    Year: 2016
    Make: Hyundai
    Model: Tucson
    Trim: Limited AWD
    Engine: Turbocharged 1.6L GDI Four-Cylinder
    Driveline: Seven-Speed Dual-Clutch Automatic, All-Wheel Drive
    Horsepower @ RPM: 175 @ 5,500
    Torque @ RPM: 195 @ 1,500 - 4,500
    Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 24/28/26
    Curb Weight: 3,710 lbs
    Location of Manufacture: Ulsan, South Korea
    Base Price: $31,300
    As Tested Price: $34,945 (Includes $895.00 Destination Charge)

     

    Options:
    Ultimate Package for Limited - $2,750.00

    0


    Sign in to follow this  
    Followers 0


    User Feedback


    There are no comments to display.



    Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

    Guest
    You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
    Add a comment...

    ×   You have pasted content with formatting.   Remove formatting

      Only 75 emoticons maximum are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor




  • Popular Stories

  • Today's Birthdays

    1. stlcadet11
      stlcadet11
      (27 years old)
  • Similar Content

    • By ccap41
      Hey-o,
      I haven't really started a running thread for the new car yet so here it is. I think I owned the car for 8 days when I had my windows tinted 20% all the way around. I cannot stand driving a car w/o tint or the look of a vehicle w/o tint.
      This is about the only "before" picture I have of it.

      Only a few days and $270 later...
      There was actually one thing I bought prior to buying a car that I wanted in my next vehicle... a dash cam. After the accident and knowing that had I not had a witness stop and give their side of the story it could have been a hell hole of he-said she-said.. So I did a little research and bought a Spytec A119 w/ the GPS(you can get it w/o the GPS). Super clean and muuuuch easier install than I expected. The only wires exposed are coming from the center console down and then again from the headliner to the cam itself. The rest is completely hidden.


      A view from the driver's seat... I don't see it at all. That's exactly what I wanted to keep it from being a distraction.

      A view from the outside. It's very difficult to see.

      This past week I finally ordered and received my wheels and tires. This is the first vehicle I've ever actually gone through with changing them as I've always wanted to on all of my vehicles.
      I went with a 18x8 Konig Oversteer wrapped in a 225/45ZR18 Continental ExtremeContact DW. I'll be using the OE setup for the winter months.
      I'll get better pictures of the wheels when I get home.

      OE wheel/tire combo = 47lbs

      New wheel/tire combo = 42.5lbs

       
      I think the only other thing that I would really like to do is wrap the chrome door outline in black or a black chrome.
    • By William Maley
      In the past two years, I have driven three variations of the Volkswagen Golf; the GTI, SportWagen, and R. But I never had the chance to drive the standard Golf. That is until a couple of months ago when a Golf Wolfsburg Edition rolled up. For 2017, the Wolfsburg is one of the two trims on offer (the base S being the other) and comes with lots of equipment for a surprising price. But this is only the cherry on top of an impressive compact hatchback as I would find out.
      Let’s begin with that surprising price. Our Golf Wolfsburg tester came with an as-tested price of $23,515 and that includes a sunroof, push-button start, heated seats, backup camera, pre-collision braking, blind-spot monitoring, and rain-sensing wipers. Considering the amount of equipment on offer, this might be one of the best values in the compact class. I know that I’m beating a dead horse here, but I wished the Golf was just a little bit more exciting to look at. The clean lines and minimal brightwork make the Golf have a handsome profile. But park it next to something like a Chevrolet Cruze Hatchback, and you kind of wish that Volkswagen did something to make it standout. You could level the same complaint at the Golf’s interior as doesn’t have the same panache or sharpness as some competitors. But I can overlook it as the Golf has one the most functional and well-built interiors in the class. Controls are within easy reach and have a solid feel that is lacking in other compact models. It doesn’t hurt the Golf has a spacious interior for passengers and cargo. I’m 5’8” and found to have plenty of head and legroom sitting in the back. For cargo, the Golf offers up 22.8 cubic feet with the rear seats up and 52.7 cubic feet with them folded, putting it at the top of the class. Like the larger SportWagen and Alltrack, the regular Golf sports a turbocharged 1.8L four-cylinder producing 170 horsepower and 199 pound-feet of torque. My tester came with the optional six-speed automatic. A five-speed manual comes standard. This engine is such a sweetheart as it punches well above its weight. Power comes on a quick and smooth rate, meaning you’ll not be wanting for power when trying to make a pass. The automatic transmission is smart, knowing when it needs to up or downshift and doing so at a quick rate. One item that I gave the Golf SportWagen a lot of praise was the pleasant balance between a smooth ride and sharp handling. The regular Golf is much the same. Taking a corner, the vehicle shows little body roll and the steering provides a linear and quick response. It would be nice if the steering had some more weight, but otherwise, it is a fun car to hustle around. For the daily commute, the Golf offers up a comfortable ride where potholes and other imperfections are ironed out. Road and wind noise are kept to very acceptable levels. If I do have one complaint, it has to deal with the lack of adaptive cruise control. There is already a radar module up front for the pre-collision braking that can monitor vehicles ahead and bring the vehicle to a stop. So why isn’t there the ability to use that module to provide adaptive cruise control? Is it a technical issue or something dealing with the cost? (I'm thinking its the latter). That issue aside, I’m really impressed with the regular Golf. This is one of the vehicles that can deliver on being an all arounder without falling on its face due to one or many things. Plus, the Wolfsburg Edition might be the steal for the 2017 Golf lineup considering what you get. Disclaimer: Volkswagen Provided the Golf, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2017
      Make: Volkswagen
      Model: Golf
      Trim: Wolfsburg Edition
      Engine: 1.8L TSI Turbocharged Four-Cylinder
      Driveline: Six-Speed Automatic, Front-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 170 @ 4,500
      Torque @ RPM: 199 @ 1,600
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 25/35/29
      Curb Weight: 3,023 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Wolfsburg, Germany
      Base Price: $22,695
      As Tested Price: $23,515 (Includes $820.00 Destination Charge)
      Options: N/A

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      In the past two years, I have driven three variations of the Volkswagen Golf; the GTI, SportWagen, and R. But I never had the chance to drive the standard Golf. That is until a couple of months ago when a Golf Wolfsburg Edition rolled up. For 2017, the Wolfsburg is one of the two trims on offer (the base S being the other) and comes with lots of equipment for a surprising price. But this is only the cherry on top of an impressive compact hatchback as I would find out.
      Let’s begin with that surprising price. Our Golf Wolfsburg tester came with an as-tested price of $23,515 and that includes a sunroof, push-button start, heated seats, backup camera, pre-collision braking, blind-spot monitoring, and rain-sensing wipers. Considering the amount of equipment on offer, this might be one of the best values in the compact class. I know that I’m beating a dead horse here, but I wished the Golf was just a little bit more exciting to look at. The clean lines and minimal brightwork make the Golf have a handsome profile. But park it next to something like a Chevrolet Cruze Hatchback, and you kind of wish that Volkswagen did something to make it standout. You could level the same complaint at the Golf’s interior as doesn’t have the same panache or sharpness as some competitors. But I can overlook it as the Golf has one the most functional and well-built interiors in the class. Controls are within easy reach and have a solid feel that is lacking in other compact models. It doesn’t hurt the Golf has a spacious interior for passengers and cargo. I’m 5’8” and found to have plenty of head and legroom sitting in the back. For cargo, the Golf offers up 22.8 cubic feet with the rear seats up and 52.7 cubic feet with them folded, putting it at the top of the class. Like the larger SportWagen and Alltrack, the regular Golf sports a turbocharged 1.8L four-cylinder producing 170 horsepower and 199 pound-feet of torque. My tester came with the optional six-speed automatic. A five-speed manual comes standard. This engine is such a sweetheart as it punches well above its weight. Power comes on a quick and smooth rate, meaning you’ll not be wanting for power when trying to make a pass. The automatic transmission is smart, knowing when it needs to up or downshift and doing so at a quick rate. One item that I gave the Golf SportWagen a lot of praise was the pleasant balance between a smooth ride and sharp handling. The regular Golf is much the same. Taking a corner, the vehicle shows little body roll and the steering provides a linear and quick response. It would be nice if the steering had some more weight, but otherwise, it is a fun car to hustle around. For the daily commute, the Golf offers up a comfortable ride where potholes and other imperfections are ironed out. Road and wind noise are kept to very acceptable levels. If I do have one complaint, it has to deal with the lack of adaptive cruise control. There is already a radar module up front for the pre-collision braking that can monitor vehicles ahead and bring the vehicle to a stop. So why isn’t there the ability to use that module to provide adaptive cruise control? Is it a technical issue or something dealing with the cost? (I'm thinking its the latter). That issue aside, I’m really impressed with the regular Golf. This is one of the vehicles that can deliver on being an all arounder without falling on its face due to one or many things. Plus, the Wolfsburg Edition might be the steal for the 2017 Golf lineup considering what you get. Disclaimer: Volkswagen Provided the Golf, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2017
      Make: Volkswagen
      Model: Golf
      Trim: Wolfsburg Edition
      Engine: 1.8L TSI Turbocharged Four-Cylinder
      Driveline: Six-Speed Automatic, Front-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 170 @ 4,500
      Torque @ RPM: 199 @ 1,600
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 25/35/29
      Curb Weight: 3,023 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Wolfsburg, Germany
      Base Price: $22,695
      As Tested Price: $23,515 (Includes $820.00 Destination Charge)
      Options: N/A
    • By Drew Dowdell
      Hyundai has been trying hard with the Sonata in the crowded mid-size segment for at least 2 decades. When the 2015 Sonata debuted at the 2014 New York Auto Show, it was largely received with a yawn.  Despite being a competent vehicle (read our review of the 2015 Hyundai Sonata Sport 2.0T), it just wasn’t enough to fully challenge the Accord, Camry, and Fusion for love from the automotive press. As early as the following year, Hyundai had already announced a redesign for Sonata.
      Here we are back at the 2017 New York Auto Show with the redesigned 2018 Sonata.  A quick shake of the magic 8-ball says… “Outlook Not So Good”.  You can read the press release for the 2018 Hyundai Sonata here.
      The first and biggest sin in the mid-size segment is not having a Honda or Toyota badge on the hood.  The Sonata, like Optima, Malibu, and Altima, suffers from that sin.   Any car without that badge must then seriously overcome the sin in other ways.  The Subaru Legacy does it with its AWD system. The Malibu tries with a more stylish interior and useful infotainment systems.  The Fusion offers a large variety of powertrain options including a powerful turbo-charged V6 in the Fusion Sport or the more fuel sipping hybrid.
      The refreshed 2018 Sonata does not bring much new to the table. The engines are carry-over from the current model, though a new 8-speed auto is available on the top turbo model.  The interior is largely carry-over as well except for new gauges and center stack. The exterior gets a freshening with a new trapezoidal grille and new rear end treatment.  Neither of those updates feel strong enough to give the 2018 Sonata the visual distinction it needs to move the needle in the marketplace.
      For comparison sake, I spent some time poking around the 2018 Sonata and then immediately went to the Toyota, Honda, Chevy, and Kia stands.  The interior of the new Sonata just isn’t up to the task of taking on the big guns and still feels as dated as the Optima.
      In the end, the Sonata will still sell for people who want the warranty, but it’s not going to be to anyone who actually wants a Sonata… they’ll just be buying it for the deal. Is it better than the 2017 model?  Shake the Magic 8-Ball and see if you come up with a different answer. 
       

      View full article
    • By Drew Dowdell
      Hyundai has been trying hard with the Sonata in the crowded mid-size segment for at least 2 decades. When the 2015 Sonata debuted at the 2014 New York Auto Show, it was largely received with a yawn.  Despite being a competent vehicle (read our review of the 2015 Hyundai Sonata Sport 2.0T), it just wasn’t enough to fully challenge the Accord, Camry, and Fusion for love from the automotive press. As early as the following year, Hyundai had already announced a redesign for Sonata.
      Here we are back at the 2017 New York Auto Show with the redesigned 2018 Sonata.  A quick shake of the magic 8-ball says… “Outlook Not So Good”.  You can read the press release for the 2018 Hyundai Sonata here.
      The first and biggest sin in the mid-size segment is not having a Honda or Toyota badge on the hood.  The Sonata, like Optima, Malibu, and Altima, suffers from that sin.   Any car without that badge must then seriously overcome the sin in other ways.  The Subaru Legacy does it with its AWD system. The Malibu tries with a more stylish interior and useful infotainment systems.  The Fusion offers a large variety of powertrain options including a powerful turbo-charged V6 in the Fusion Sport or the more fuel sipping hybrid.
      The refreshed 2018 Sonata does not bring much new to the table. The engines are carry-over from the current model, though a new 8-speed auto is available on the top turbo model.  The interior is largely carry-over as well except for new gauges and center stack. The exterior gets a freshening with a new trapezoidal grille and new rear end treatment.  Neither of those updates feel strong enough to give the 2018 Sonata the visual distinction it needs to move the needle in the marketplace.
      For comparison sake, I spent some time poking around the 2018 Sonata and then immediately went to the Toyota, Honda, Chevy, and Kia stands.  The interior of the new Sonata just isn’t up to the task of taking on the big guns and still feels as dated as the Optima.
      In the end, the Sonata will still sell for people who want the warranty, but it’s not going to be to anyone who actually wants a Sonata… they’ll just be buying it for the deal. Is it better than the 2017 model?  Shake the Magic 8-Ball and see if you come up with a different answer. 
       
  • Recent Status Updates

  • Who's Online (See full list)