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Found 14 results

  1. We've been hearing for some time that Hyundai is planning an N version of the Tucson crossover. Some new details have come to light via a new report from Auto Express. According to sources, Hyundai is planning to launch a Tucson N as a swan song for the current model within the next couple of years. The model will be aimed at the likes of the Audi SQ5 and produce around 340 horsepower. 0-60 mph is said to take under six seconds. No mention of what engine will be used, or the various changes to the suspension and braking. Source: Auto Express
  2. We've been hearing for some time that Hyundai is planning an N version of the Tucson crossover. Some new details have come to light via a new report from Auto Express. According to sources, Hyundai is planning to launch a Tucson N as a swan song for the current model within the next couple of years. The model will be aimed at the likes of the Audi SQ5 and produce around 340 horsepower. 0-60 mph is said to take under six seconds. No mention of what engine will be used, or the various changes to the suspension and braking. Source: Auto Express View full article
  3. Auto Express had the chance to speak with Byung Kwon Rhim, Hyundai's global head of sales at the reveal of the 2019 Santa Fe last week. The topic of the N performance division came up and Auto Express asked if there are plans for expansion. "Tucson is under development, and other models will come after that,” Rhim said. We first heard about a fast Tucson last May when the head of N, Albert Biermann expressed interest in building one. "We started with the [i30] C segment and the Fastback [coupe] will follow and we are already working on some other concepts for the B segment [Accent] and SUV also. Right now we are open," said Biermann. Auto Express thinks the Tucson N could debut sometime in 2019. It may feature the 275 horsepower, 2.0L turbocharged four-cylinder found under the hoods of the i30 N and upcoming Veloster N Source: Auto Express View full article
  4. Auto Express had the chance to speak with Byung Kwon Rhim, Hyundai's global head of sales at the reveal of the 2019 Santa Fe last week. The topic of the N performance division came up and Auto Express asked if there are plans for expansion. "Tucson is under development, and other models will come after that,” Rhim said. We first heard about a fast Tucson last May when the head of N, Albert Biermann expressed interest in building one. "We started with the [i30] C segment and the Fastback [coupe] will follow and we are already working on some other concepts for the B segment [Accent] and SUV also. Right now we are open," said Biermann. Auto Express thinks the Tucson N could debut sometime in 2019. It may feature the 275 horsepower, 2.0L turbocharged four-cylinder found under the hoods of the i30 N and upcoming Veloster N Source: Auto Express
  5. We had high hopes for the Hyundai Tucson when we did a first drive back in August 2015. But when we did our full review last April, we ended it by saying the model wasn’t “the slam dunk we thought it was.” This was due to some key issues such as a small cargo area, a tough value argument and a dual-clutch transmission having some hesitating issues. A year later, we find ourselves revisiting the Tucson. There has been a software update to the transmission, along with some minor changes to the infotainment system and interior. A quick refresher on the Tucson’s powertrain lineup: A 2.0L four-cylinder producing 164 horsepower and 151 pound-feet of torque is used on the base SE and SE Plus. The rest of the Tucson lineup features a turbocharged 1.6L four-cylinder with 175 horsepower and 195 pound-feet of torque. A six-speed automatic comes standard on the 2.0L, while the turbo 1.6 gets a seven-speed dual-clutch transmission. The engine does show some turbo lag when leaving a stop, but it will soon pick up steam and move the Tucson at a pretty decent rate. The engine doesn’t feel overtaxed when you need to make a pass. The seven-speed dual-clutch transmission still has issues. While Hyundai has reduced some of the hesitation issues we experienced in the last Tucson via a software update, there is still a fair amount of this when leaving from a dead stop. We also noticed some rough upshifts during our week. At least the ride and handling characteristics have not changed since our last test. The Tucson still provides one of the smoothest rides in the class, even with the Limited’s 19-inch wheels. It doesn’t flinch when going around a corner as body motions are kept in check. A Mazda CX-5 would be more fun to drive as it is quicker when transitioning from one corner to another and the steering has the right amount of weight and feel. Road and wind noise are kept to very acceptable levels. The interior remains mostly unchanged except for a couple of minor things. The 8-inch touchscreen system now features Android Auto and Apple CarPlay compatibility. We’re impressed with how fast the system was able to find the iPhone and bring up the CarPlay interface. The other change deals with more soft-touch materials being added to various parts of the interior. There is still a fair amount of hard plastics, even on the high-end Limited model which is very disappointing. There is still a lot to like about the Tucson’s interior. Space is plentiful for those sitting in the front or rear seats, even with the optional panoramic sunroof. The list of standard equipment is quite extensive as well. Limited models get automatic headlights, power and heated front seats, an 8-speaker Infinity sound system, dual-zone automatic climate control, proximity key with push-button start, and blind-spot monitoring. Cargo space still trails competitors with only 31 cubic feet with the rear seats up and 61.9 cubic feet when folded. The CR-V offers 35.2 and 70.9 cubic feet respectively. The Limited seen here came with a $35,210 as-tested price, which is about average for a fully-loaded crossover in this class. But the Tucson becomes a bit of a tough sell when dropping to the lower trims as you cannot get certain features. As we noted in our full review last year, “if you want navigation or dual-zone climate control on the Sport, you’re out of luck.” Despite some of the changes made for 2017, our verdict is much the same as the 2016 Tucson. There is a lot to like about the Tucson, but there are still some issues the company needs to address - smoothing out the dual-clutch and trying to make the model a better value. Disclaimer: Hyundai Provided the Tucson, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas Year: 2017 Make: Hyundai Model: Tucson Trim: Limited AWD Engine: Turbocharged 1.6L GDI Four-Cylinder Driveline: Seven-Speed Dual-Clutch Automatic, All-Wheel Drive Horsepower @ RPM: 175 @ 5,500 Torque @ RPM: 195 @ 1,500-4,500 Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 24/28/25 Curb Weight: 3,686 lbs Location of Manufacture: Ulsan, South Korea Base Price: $31,175 As Tested Price: $35,201 (Includes $895.00 Destination Charge) Options: Ultimate Package - $2,750.00 Cargo Cover - $190.00 Reversible Cargo Tray - $100.00 Rear Bumper Applique - $70.00 First Aid Kit - $30.00 View full article
  6. We had high hopes for the Hyundai Tucson when we did a first drive back in August 2015. But when we did our full review last April, we ended it by saying the model wasn’t “the slam dunk we thought it was.” This was due to some key issues such as a small cargo area, a tough value argument and a dual-clutch transmission having some hesitating issues. A year later, we find ourselves revisiting the Tucson. There has been a software update to the transmission, along with some minor changes to the infotainment system and interior. A quick refresher on the Tucson’s powertrain lineup: A 2.0L four-cylinder producing 164 horsepower and 151 pound-feet of torque is used on the base SE and SE Plus. The rest of the Tucson lineup features a turbocharged 1.6L four-cylinder with 175 horsepower and 195 pound-feet of torque. A six-speed automatic comes standard on the 2.0L, while the turbo 1.6 gets a seven-speed dual-clutch transmission. The engine does show some turbo lag when leaving a stop, but it will soon pick up steam and move the Tucson at a pretty decent rate. The engine doesn’t feel overtaxed when you need to make a pass. The seven-speed dual-clutch transmission still has issues. While Hyundai has reduced some of the hesitation issues we experienced in the last Tucson via a software update, there is still a fair amount of this when leaving from a dead stop. We also noticed some rough upshifts during our week. At least the ride and handling characteristics have not changed since our last test. The Tucson still provides one of the smoothest rides in the class, even with the Limited’s 19-inch wheels. It doesn’t flinch when going around a corner as body motions are kept in check. A Mazda CX-5 would be more fun to drive as it is quicker when transitioning from one corner to another and the steering has the right amount of weight and feel. Road and wind noise are kept to very acceptable levels. The interior remains mostly unchanged except for a couple of minor things. The 8-inch touchscreen system now features Android Auto and Apple CarPlay compatibility. We’re impressed with how fast the system was able to find the iPhone and bring up the CarPlay interface. The other change deals with more soft-touch materials being added to various parts of the interior. There is still a fair amount of hard plastics, even on the high-end Limited model which is very disappointing. There is still a lot to like about the Tucson’s interior. Space is plentiful for those sitting in the front or rear seats, even with the optional panoramic sunroof. The list of standard equipment is quite extensive as well. Limited models get automatic headlights, power and heated front seats, an 8-speaker Infinity sound system, dual-zone automatic climate control, proximity key with push-button start, and blind-spot monitoring. Cargo space still trails competitors with only 31 cubic feet with the rear seats up and 61.9 cubic feet when folded. The CR-V offers 35.2 and 70.9 cubic feet respectively. The Limited seen here came with a $35,210 as-tested price, which is about average for a fully-loaded crossover in this class. But the Tucson becomes a bit of a tough sell when dropping to the lower trims as you cannot get certain features. As we noted in our full review last year, “if you want navigation or dual-zone climate control on the Sport, you’re out of luck.” Despite some of the changes made for 2017, our verdict is much the same as the 2016 Tucson. There is a lot to like about the Tucson, but there are still some issues the company needs to address - smoothing out the dual-clutch and trying to make the model a better value. Disclaimer: Hyundai Provided the Tucson, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas Year: 2017 Make: Hyundai Model: Tucson Trim: Limited AWD Engine: Turbocharged 1.6L GDI Four-Cylinder Driveline: Seven-Speed Dual-Clutch Automatic, All-Wheel Drive Horsepower @ RPM: 175 @ 5,500 Torque @ RPM: 195 @ 1,500-4,500 Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 24/28/25 Curb Weight: 3,686 lbs Location of Manufacture: Ulsan, South Korea Base Price: $31,175 As Tested Price: $35,201 (Includes $895.00 Destination Charge) Options: Ultimate Package - $2,750.00 Cargo Cover - $190.00 Reversible Cargo Tray - $100.00 Rear Bumper Applique - $70.00 First Aid Kit - $30.00
  7. The Hyundai Tucson has never been a real serious threat in the compact crossover segment. It isn’t that Hyundai wasn’t trying. They offered a lot of equipment at a low price and went with a unique design. But even with these traits, the Tucson wasn’t able to make a sizable dent into the compact crossover market where the likes of the Honda CR-V, Ford Escape, and Subaru Forester rule the roost. Hyundai isn’t giving up the fight, though. Last year, they launched the third-generation Tucson to make some inroads in the class. As we said in our first drive back in August, “it may be that the 2016 Hyundai Tucson can be considered one of the best in its class.” Let's see how we feel when we revisit the 2016 Tucson after some time has passed. To make the Tucson standout in a crowded class, Hyundai has put a lot of effort into the Tucson’s design. There is a fair amount of European influence with sharp lines and an uncluttered look. Hyundai’s trademark elements such as a large hexagonal grille and slim headlights are here. A set of 19-inch alloys on the Limited are designed in such a way that it looks like an airplane propeller. The design work has paid off as the Tucson is one of the sharpest looking models in the class. The Tucson’s interior doesn’t have the same flair as the exterior which is quite a shame. Is isn’t to say the interior is bad; there is a good mix of hard and soft materials, and controls are arranged in a logical fashion. But I found myself wishing Hyundai would take a small risk and add something special to the interior. Our Tucson Limited tester came with leather seats with power adjustments for the front. Comfort and support levels are excellent. In the back, the Tucson offers plenty of head and legroom for most passengers. As we noted in our first drive, the Tucson loses out in cargo space. Open the tailgate and you’ll be greeted with 31 cubic feet. Fold the rear seats and space increases to 61.9. Competitors such as the Honda CR-V (35.2, 70.9 cubic feet), Subaru Forester (34.4, 74.7 cubic feet), and Toyota RAV4 (38.4, 73.4 cubic feet) offer more space. When it comes to technology, the Tucson Limited does very well. There is an eight-inch touchscreen with the latest version of Hyundai’s infotainment system. We like this system as it is one of the easier systems to use thanks to large touchpoints and buttons under the screen to take you to the various parts of the system. One thing we are slightly disappointed is that you cannot option the larger screen on the Sport trim, which slightly hurts Hyundai’s value argument. Most Hyundai Tucsons will come equipped with a turbocharged 1.6L four-cylinder producing 175 horsepower and 195 pound-feet of torque. This is paired with a seven-speed dual-clutch automatic and the choice of either front or all-wheel drive. The turbo engine is potent thanks to the torque being available across a wide range (1,500 to 4,500 rpm). This means the Tucson is able to scoot along when you are trying to make a pass or leaving from a stop. The engine is also very refined with very little noise coming into the cabin. Sadly we cannot say the same about the dual-clutch transmission. Unlike the transmission we tried out on our first drive, the one in our test Tucson had issues of hesitating when leaving a stop and taking its sweet time to downshift whenever we needed to make a pass. At least upshifts were quick and smooth. Now when we turned in our Tucson tester, we learned that Hyundai issued an update for the transmission to fix the hesitation issue. If the Tucson was built before November 17, 2015 - which we suspect ours was - Hyundai’s dealers would perform the update on the vehicle. Tucsons built after November 17th have the update installed. The Hyundai Tucson Limited AWD is rated by the EPA at 24 City/28 Highway/26 Combined. Our average for the week landed around 26 MPG. Those who want to eek out a few more MPGs should look at the Tucson Eco that comes with some fuel saving tricks such as lighter wheels to improve fuel economy to 26 City/33 Highway/29 Combined for the front-wheel drive model. All-wheel drive models see a small decrease in fuel economy numbers. One thing that hasn’t changed from our first drive impressions is the Tucson’s ride and handling characteristics. Over Michigan’s terrible roads with endless bumps and potholes, the Tucson’s suspension was able to iron them out and provide a smooth ride. An extraordinary feat when you take into account the Tucson Limited feature a set of 19-inch wheels. Handling is impressive for a Hyundai with little body roll and the vehicle feeling planted. The only item we wished Hyundai would work on is the steering. There is still a slight dead zone when beginning to turn the wheel. At least some weight does appear the further you turn. It seems Hyundai has mostly hit it out of the park with the new Tucson. Not quite. The big issue for the Tucson is the value argument. Our Limited all-wheel drive came with a base price of $31,300. The as-tested price landed around $34,945 with the Ultimate package that adds HID headlights, ventilated front seats, heated rear seats, lane departure warning, and a panoramic sunroof. This about the average price you would expect for other loaded small crossovers. It is only when you drop down to other trims that you begin to realize the Tucson isn’t as a great of a value as you might think. For example, the Eco and Sport don’t come with any options. The only items you get to choose are color and whether you want front or all-wheel drive. If you want navigation or dual-zone climate control on the Sport, you’re out of luck. That isn’t to say there aren't a lot of good things to the Tucson because there are. It stands out with some of the sharpest looks in the class and the turbo engine is one of best we have driven. Hyundai also deserves some kudos for getting the ride and handling balance just right. But the Tucson has a value problem that could drive some folks away, along with a small cargo area for the class. The 2016 Tucson is good, but it isn’t the slam dunk we thought it was. Cheers: Exterior design that stands out, turbo engine, nice balance between sport and comfort Jeers: Value argument tough to argue on lower trims, small rear cargo area, interior design could use some more flair. Disclaimer: Hyundai Provided the Tuscon, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas Year: 2016 Make: Hyundai Model: Tucson Trim: Limited AWD Engine: Turbocharged 1.6L GDI Four-Cylinder Driveline: Seven-Speed Dual-Clutch Automatic, All-Wheel Drive Horsepower @ RPM: 175 @ 5,500 Torque @ RPM: 195 @ 1,500 - 4,500 Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 24/28/26 Curb Weight: 3,710 lbs Location of Manufacture: Ulsan, South Korea Base Price: $31,300 As Tested Price: $34,945 (Includes $895.00 Destination Charge) Options: Ultimate Package for Limited - $2,750.00
  8. The Hyundai Tucson has never been a real serious threat in the compact crossover segment. It isn’t that Hyundai wasn’t trying. They offered a lot of equipment at a low price and went with a unique design. But even with these traits, the Tucson wasn’t able to make a sizable dent into the compact crossover market where the likes of the Honda CR-V, Ford Escape, and Subaru Forester rule the roost. Hyundai isn’t giving up the fight, though. Last year, they launched the third-generation Tucson to make some inroads in the class. As we said in our first drive back in August, “it may be that the 2016 Hyundai Tucson can be considered one of the best in its class.” Let's see how we feel when we revisit the 2016 Tucson after some time has passed. To make the Tucson standout in a crowded class, Hyundai has put a lot of effort into the Tucson’s design. There is a fair amount of European influence with sharp lines and an uncluttered look. Hyundai’s trademark elements such as a large hexagonal grille and slim headlights are here. A set of 19-inch alloys on the Limited are designed in such a way that it looks like an airplane propeller. The design work has paid off as the Tucson is one of the sharpest looking models in the class. The Tucson’s interior doesn’t have the same flair as the exterior which is quite a shame. Is isn’t to say the interior is bad; there is a good mix of hard and soft materials, and controls are arranged in a logical fashion. But I found myself wishing Hyundai would take a small risk and add something special to the interior. Our Tucson Limited tester came with leather seats with power adjustments for the front. Comfort and support levels are excellent. In the back, the Tucson offers plenty of head and legroom for most passengers. As we noted in our first drive, the Tucson loses out in cargo space. Open the tailgate and you’ll be greeted with 31 cubic feet. Fold the rear seats and space increases to 61.9. Competitors such as the Honda CR-V (35.2, 70.9 cubic feet), Subaru Forester (34.4, 74.7 cubic feet), and Toyota RAV4 (38.4, 73.4 cubic feet) offer more space. When it comes to technology, the Tucson Limited does very well. There is an eight-inch touchscreen with the latest version of Hyundai’s infotainment system. We like this system as it is one of the easier systems to use thanks to large touchpoints and buttons under the screen to take you to the various parts of the system. One thing we are slightly disappointed is that you cannot option the larger screen on the Sport trim, which slightly hurts Hyundai’s value argument. Most Hyundai Tucsons will come equipped with a turbocharged 1.6L four-cylinder producing 175 horsepower and 195 pound-feet of torque. This is paired with a seven-speed dual-clutch automatic and the choice of either front or all-wheel drive. The turbo engine is potent thanks to the torque being available across a wide range (1,500 to 4,500 rpm). This means the Tucson is able to scoot along when you are trying to make a pass or leaving from a stop. The engine is also very refined with very little noise coming into the cabin. Sadly we cannot say the same about the dual-clutch transmission. Unlike the transmission we tried out on our first drive, the one in our test Tucson had issues of hesitating when leaving a stop and taking its sweet time to downshift whenever we needed to make a pass. At least upshifts were quick and smooth. Now when we turned in our Tucson tester, we learned that Hyundai issued an update for the transmission to fix the hesitation issue. If the Tucson was built before November 17, 2015 - which we suspect ours was - Hyundai’s dealers would perform the update on the vehicle. Tucsons built after November 17th have the update installed. The Hyundai Tucson Limited AWD is rated by the EPA at 24 City/28 Highway/26 Combined. Our average for the week landed around 26 MPG. Those who want to eek out a few more MPGs should look at the Tucson Eco that comes with some fuel saving tricks such as lighter wheels to improve fuel economy to 26 City/33 Highway/29 Combined for the front-wheel drive model. All-wheel drive models see a small decrease in fuel economy numbers. One thing that hasn’t changed from our first drive impressions is the Tucson’s ride and handling characteristics. Over Michigan’s terrible roads with endless bumps and potholes, the Tucson’s suspension was able to iron them out and provide a smooth ride. An extraordinary feat when you take into account the Tucson Limited feature a set of 19-inch wheels. Handling is impressive for a Hyundai with little body roll and the vehicle feeling planted. The only item we wished Hyundai would work on is the steering. There is still a slight dead zone when beginning to turn the wheel. At least some weight does appear the further you turn. It seems Hyundai has mostly hit it out of the park with the new Tucson. Not quite. The big issue for the Tucson is the value argument. Our Limited all-wheel drive came with a base price of $31,300. The as-tested price landed around $34,945 with the Ultimate package that adds HID headlights, ventilated front seats, heated rear seats, lane departure warning, and a panoramic sunroof. This about the average price you would expect for other loaded small crossovers. It is only when you drop down to other trims that you begin to realize the Tucson isn’t as a great of a value as you might think. For example, the Eco and Sport don’t come with any options. The only items you get to choose are color and whether you want front or all-wheel drive. If you want navigation or dual-zone climate control on the Sport, you’re out of luck. That isn’t to say there aren't a lot of good things to the Tucson because there are. It stands out with some of the sharpest looks in the class and the turbo engine is one of best we have driven. Hyundai also deserves some kudos for getting the ride and handling balance just right. But the Tucson has a value problem that could drive some folks away, along with a small cargo area for the class. The 2016 Tucson is good, but it isn’t the slam dunk we thought it was. Cheers: Exterior design that stands out, turbo engine, nice balance between sport and comfort Jeers: Value argument tough to argue on lower trims, small rear cargo area, interior design could use some more flair. Disclaimer: Hyundai Provided the Tuscon, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas Year: 2016 Make: Hyundai Model: Tucson Trim: Limited AWD Engine: Turbocharged 1.6L GDI Four-Cylinder Driveline: Seven-Speed Dual-Clutch Automatic, All-Wheel Drive Horsepower @ RPM: 175 @ 5,500 Torque @ RPM: 195 @ 1,500 - 4,500 Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 24/28/26 Curb Weight: 3,710 lbs Location of Manufacture: Ulsan, South Korea Base Price: $31,300 As Tested Price: $34,945 (Includes $895.00 Destination Charge) Options: Ultimate Package for Limited - $2,750.00 View full article
  9. FOUNTAIN VALLEY, Calif., March 1, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- Hyundai Motor America today reported its best February in company history, selling 53,009 units for the month, up one percent versus the same period last year. "The strong demand for the all-new Tucson continued through the month with sales up 90 percent over last February," said Derrick Hatami, vice president of national sales for Hyundai Motor America. "Our refreshed Santa Fe and Santa Fe Sport models have begun hitting showrooms. Combined with the success of Tucson, we expect our CUV lineup to lead the charge as we close out the first quarter." Genesis sedan saw sales gains of 13 percent while Equus climbed 38 percent. Other standouts include Sonata with sales up 25 percent and Veloster up 35 percent. CARLINE FEB/2016 FEB/2015 CY/2016 CY/2015 ACCENT 4,897 4,867 9,947 9,305 SONATA 17,470 13,987 32,679 26,350 ELANTRA 11,973 15,708 21,858 27,948 SANTA FE 5,532 8,762 10,671 16,511 AZERA 438 757 847 1,341 TUCSON 7,336 3,869 12,554 6,905 VELOSTER 2,101 1,555 4,124 2,857 GENESIS 2,976 2,793 4,883 5,366 EQUUS 286 207 457 427 TOTAL 53,009 52,505 98,020 97,010
  10. Americans can’t seem to get enough crossovers. A study done by IHS Automotive showed that one out of every three vehicles sold in the U.S. is a crossover of some various size. Hence why it seems a week doesn’t go by without an announcement of a new crossover from ‘x’ automaker. One area that seems to have new or redesigned models coming fast and furious is the compact crossover class. New models are wanting to take a nice chunk of sales from the stalwarts such as the Honda CR-V, Subaru Forester, and Toyota RAV4. Whether it's with impressive handling characteristics (Mazda CX-5) or the availability to have three rows (Nissan Rogue), new models are beginning to take a stand on the sales chart. Hyundai is the latest automaker to ready an attack on the old guard with the third-generation Tucson. The Korean automaker hopes the formula it has seemingly perfected over the past few years of great looks, an impressive feature set, and a low price tag can make the Tucson a contender in the class. I recently spent some time in Minneapolis and parts of Wisconsin driving the new Tucson to see if the model has a chance. One of the key focuses for Hyundai on the 2016 Tucson was style. How do you make your model stand out in a crowded class? Hyundai decided to grace the 2016 Tucson with its Fluidic Sculpture 2.0 design language complete with sharp lines, hexagonal grille, and a set of slimmer head and taillights. One key design item Hyundai pointed out during the briefing was how the wheel arches were raked forward to promote the feeling of movement. I have to admit that Fluidic Sculpture 2.0 has been hit and miss on some of the Hyundai models. I think it works great on the Genesis as it gives it an identity, while it makes the Sonata quite boring. For the Tucson, it works very well. The model is very striking and at certain angles, reminds me of the Mazda CX-5. The interior doesn’t have quite the same flair as the exterior, which is kind of a shame. But that doesn’t mean Hyundai left the interior as an afterthought. The design is simple with a wraparound dashboard and the use of contrasting materials. There is an equal mix of hard and soft-touch materials throughout, common for the class. Higher trims get a bit more soft-touch materials to make it feel more premium. In terms of standard equipment, the Tucson comes loaded. The base model boasts spilt-folding rear seats, a five-inch touchscreen radio, backup camera, and Bluetooth. Climb up to higher trims and features such as an eight-inch touchscreen with navigation, blind-spot monitoring, dual-zone climate control, heated and cooled front seats, and leather seats become available. In terms of comfort, the Tucson scores well when it comes to passengers. The front seats have a fair amount of adjustment to get you into the right position, and also provide enough support for short and long trips. Back seat passengers will find a fair amount of head and legroom. The only disappointment in the Tucson’s interior is cargo space. Compared to the best-selling CR-V, the Tucson is 4.2 cubic feet smaller with the seats up (31 vs. 35.2) and 9 cubic feet smaller with the seats down (61.9 vs. 70.9). For power, the Tucson comes with two engines. The base SE model uses the 2.0L GDI four-cylinder from the Elantra with 164 horsepower and 151 pound-feet of torque. This paired to a six-speed automatic. Front-wheel drive comes standard, though if you want all-wheel drive, you’ll need to order the SE Popular package. Eco and trims above it come with the turbocharged 1.6L four-cylinder found in the Sonata Eco. The 1.6 makes 175 horsepower and 195 pound-feet of torque. This comes paired with a seven-speed dual-clutch automatic and the choice of front or all-wheel drive. Fuel economy numbers for both engines are as followed: 2.0L FWD: 21 City/31 Highway/26 Combined 2.0L AWD: 21 City/26 Highway/ 23 Combined 1.6T FWD Eco: 26 City/33 Highway/29 Combined 1.6T AWD Eco: 25 City/31 Highway/27 Combined 1.6T FWD Sport/Limited: 25 City/30 Highway/27 Combined 1.6T AWD Sport/Limited: 24 City/28 Highway/26 Combined Now the slight difference in fuel economy numbers between the Eco and Sport/Limited models mostly comes down to wheel size. The Eco comes with 17-inch wheels, while the Sport and Limited use 19-inch wheels. Let’s move on to the drive. Now before we dive into my impressions of the 2016 Tucson, I need to make note of something important. I didn’t get the chance to get behind the wheel of the Tucson equipped with the 2.0L engine. Hopefully in the future, I’ll be able to provide some impressions on that model. Getting behind the wheel of the 1.6T, I found it to be a very potent engine. This is thanks in part to the 195 pound-feet of torque that arrives at 1,500 rpm and continues to 4,000 rpm. No matter when I needed to make a pass or merge onto the expressway, the engine was ready to get moving. Hyundai also deserves some credit for making the engine very quiet at idle. The seven-speed dual-clutch automatic did cause me some worry as I had an unpleasant experience in a Sonata Eco I drove a couple months back. The transmission in the Eco was very sloppy in its shift and seemed to be confused with the 1-2 shift. For the Tucson, Hyundai has made a number of improvements to the transmission to make the shifts much smoother. The difference is very apparent with the transmission delivering smooth and quick shifts. As for ride and handling, the Tucson strikes a balance between sport and comfort. Hyundai has put a bit work into the suspension with a multi-link rear setup coming to all models - the last-generation Tucson used a single-link rear setup on the front-wheel drive model. The Tucson’s structure has also seen some improvements, with the body seeing a 48 percent bump in rigidity thanks to increasing the use of high-strength steel. Driving on a wide range of roads, the Tucson impressed in how it managed all manner of bumps and imperfections. The suspension was able to keep the impacts from reaching the passengers inside. More impressive was how quiet the Tucson was. Even on rough, gravel roads, the Tucson was able to keep road noise at a minimum. The Tucson’s handling may be Hyundai’s best effort yet. The crossover feels planted and shows no sign of body roll when being pushed. The only downside is the steering has a dead-zone when you begin to turn the wheel. Some resistance does appear when you turn the wheel further. This will annoy some people, but many will not even notice it. Pricing for the new the 2016 Hyundai Tucson begins at $23,595 for the base SE front-wheel drive (includes an $895 destination charge) and climbs to $34,945 for the Limited all-wheel drive equipped with the Ultimate package. Considering the amount of standard equipment for each trim level, the Tucson is quite the value. The third-generation Hyundai Tucson looks be the model to take on the old-guard in the compact crossover class. The new Tucson does mostly everything a crossover should do, along with impressive exterior design, an extensive feature set, and a turbocharged engine that is punchy. It may be that the 2016 Hyundai Tucson can be considered one of the best in its class. Disclaimer: Hyundai Invited Cheers & Gears To A National Launch for the Tucson. Year: 2016 Make: Hyundai Model: Tucson Engine: 2.0L GDI DOHC Four-Cylinder, Turbocharged 1.6L GDI DOHC Four-Cylinder Driveline: Front-Wheel Drive, All-Wheel Drive: Six-Speed Automatic, Seven-Speed Dual Clutch Horsepower @ RPM: 164 @ 6,200 (2.0L); 175 @ 5,500 (1.6T) Torque @ RPM: 151 @ 4,000 (2.0L); 195 @ 1,500-4,500 (1.6T) Curb Weight: 3,325 to 3,710 lbs Prices: $23,595 to $34,595 (Includes $895 destination charge) View full article
  11. Americans can’t seem to get enough crossovers. A study done by IHS Automotive showed that one out of every three vehicles sold in the U.S. is a crossover of some various size. Hence why it seems a week doesn’t go by without an announcement of a new crossover from ‘x’ automaker. One area that seems to have new or redesigned models coming fast and furious is the compact crossover class. New models are wanting to take a nice chunk of sales from the stalwarts such as the Honda CR-V, Subaru Forester, and Toyota RAV4. Whether it's with impressive handling characteristics (Mazda CX-5) or the availability to have three rows (Nissan Rogue), new models are beginning to take a stand on the sales chart. Hyundai is the latest automaker to ready an attack on the old guard with the third-generation Tucson. The Korean automaker hopes the formula it has seemingly perfected over the past few years of great looks, an impressive feature set, and a low price tag can make the Tucson a contender in the class. I recently spent some time in Minneapolis and parts of Wisconsin driving the new Tucson to see if the model has a chance. One of the key focuses for Hyundai on the 2016 Tucson was style. How do you make your model stand out in a crowded class? Hyundai decided to grace the 2016 Tucson with its Fluidic Sculpture 2.0 design language complete with sharp lines, hexagonal grille, and a set of slimmer head and taillights. One key design item Hyundai pointed out during the briefing was how the wheel arches were raked forward to promote the feeling of movement. I have to admit that Fluidic Sculpture 2.0 has been hit and miss on some of the Hyundai models. I think it works great on the Genesis as it gives it an identity, while it makes the Sonata quite boring. For the Tucson, it works very well. The model is very striking and at certain angles, reminds me of the Mazda CX-5. The interior doesn’t have quite the same flair as the exterior, which is kind of a shame. But that doesn’t mean Hyundai left the interior as an afterthought. The design is simple with a wraparound dashboard and the use of contrasting materials. There is an equal mix of hard and soft-touch materials throughout, common for the class. Higher trims get a bit more soft-touch materials to make it feel more premium. In terms of standard equipment, the Tucson comes loaded. The base model boasts spilt-folding rear seats, a five-inch touchscreen radio, backup camera, and Bluetooth. Climb up to higher trims and features such as an eight-inch touchscreen with navigation, blind-spot monitoring, dual-zone climate control, heated and cooled front seats, and leather seats become available. In terms of comfort, the Tucson scores well when it comes to passengers. The front seats have a fair amount of adjustment to get you into the right position, and also provide enough support for short and long trips. Back seat passengers will find a fair amount of head and legroom. The only disappointment in the Tucson’s interior is cargo space. Compared to the best-selling CR-V, the Tucson is 4.2 cubic feet smaller with the seats up (31 vs. 35.2) and 9 cubic feet smaller with the seats down (61.9 vs. 70.9). For power, the Tucson comes with two engines. The base SE model uses the 2.0L GDI four-cylinder from the Elantra with 164 horsepower and 151 pound-feet of torque. This paired to a six-speed automatic. Front-wheel drive comes standard, though if you want all-wheel drive, you’ll need to order the SE Popular package. Eco and trims above it come with the turbocharged 1.6L four-cylinder found in the Sonata Eco. The 1.6 makes 175 horsepower and 195 pound-feet of torque. This comes paired with a seven-speed dual-clutch automatic and the choice of front or all-wheel drive. Fuel economy numbers for both engines are as followed: 2.0L FWD: 21 City/31 Highway/26 Combined 2.0L AWD: 21 City/26 Highway/ 23 Combined 1.6T FWD Eco: 26 City/33 Highway/29 Combined 1.6T AWD Eco: 25 City/31 Highway/27 Combined 1.6T FWD Sport/Limited: 25 City/30 Highway/27 Combined 1.6T AWD Sport/Limited: 24 City/28 Highway/26 Combined Now the slight difference in fuel economy numbers between the Eco and Sport/Limited models mostly comes down to wheel size. The Eco comes with 17-inch wheels, while the Sport and Limited use 19-inch wheels. Let’s move on to the drive. Now before we dive into my impressions of the 2016 Tucson, I need to make note of something important. I didn’t get the chance to get behind the wheel of the Tucson equipped with the 2.0L engine. Hopefully in the future, I’ll be able to provide some impressions on that model. Getting behind the wheel of the 1.6T, I found it to be a very potent engine. This is thanks in part to the 195 pound-feet of torque that arrives at 1,500 rpm and continues to 4,000 rpm. No matter when I needed to make a pass or merge onto the expressway, the engine was ready to get moving. Hyundai also deserves some credit for making the engine very quiet at idle. The seven-speed dual-clutch automatic did cause me some worry as I had an unpleasant experience in a Sonata Eco I drove a couple months back. The transmission in the Eco was very sloppy in its shift and seemed to be confused with the 1-2 shift. For the Tucson, Hyundai has made a number of improvements to the transmission to make the shifts much smoother. The difference is very apparent with the transmission delivering smooth and quick shifts. As for ride and handling, the Tucson strikes a balance between sport and comfort. Hyundai has put a bit work into the suspension with a multi-link rear setup coming to all models - the last-generation Tucson used a single-link rear setup on the front-wheel drive model. The Tucson’s structure has also seen some improvements, with the body seeing a 48 percent bump in rigidity thanks to increasing the use of high-strength steel. Driving on a wide range of roads, the Tucson impressed in how it managed all manner of bumps and imperfections. The suspension was able to keep the impacts from reaching the passengers inside. More impressive was how quiet the Tucson was. Even on rough, gravel roads, the Tucson was able to keep road noise at a minimum. The Tucson’s handling may be Hyundai’s best effort yet. The crossover feels planted and shows no sign of body roll when being pushed. The only downside is the steering has a dead-zone when you begin to turn the wheel. Some resistance does appear when you turn the wheel further. This will annoy some people, but many will not even notice it. Pricing for the new the 2016 Hyundai Tucson begins at $23,595 for the base SE front-wheel drive (includes an $895 destination charge) and climbs to $34,945 for the Limited all-wheel drive equipped with the Ultimate package. Considering the amount of standard equipment for each trim level, the Tucson is quite the value. The third-generation Hyundai Tucson looks be the model to take on the old-guard in the compact crossover class. The new Tucson does mostly everything a crossover should do, along with impressive exterior design, an extensive feature set, and a turbocharged engine that is punchy. It may be that the 2016 Hyundai Tucson can be considered one of the best in its class. Disclaimer: Hyundai Invited Cheers & Gears To A National Launch for the Tucson. Year: 2016 Make: Hyundai Model: Tucson Engine: 2.0L GDI DOHC Four-Cylinder, Turbocharged 1.6L GDI DOHC Four-Cylinder Driveline: Front-Wheel Drive, All-Wheel Drive: Six-Speed Automatic, Seven-Speed Dual Clutch Horsepower @ RPM: 164 @ 6,200 (2.0L); 175 @ 5,500 (1.6T) Torque @ RPM: 151 @ 4,000 (2.0L); 195 @ 1,500-4,500 (1.6T) Curb Weight: 3,325 to 3,710 lbs Prices: $23,595 to $34,595 (Includes $895 destination charge)
  12. The smallest crossover in Hyundai's lineup - the Tucson - has finally gotten some much needed updates. Shown today in New York, the Tucson gets an all new sculpted body that helps it bring it into line with other Hyundai models. The front features a large, hexagonal grille and LED headlights. Around back, the Tucson has a sporty look with twin-exhaust ports, cleaned-up tailgate, and LED taillights. The interior has been simplified with an improved layout and new controls for the infotainment and climate control systems. Thanks to increase in length and width, the Tucson sees cargo space increase from 26 cubic feet to 31. There are two engines available for the 2016 Hyundai Tucson: 2.0L direct-injected four-cylinder: 164 horsepower and 151 pound-feet of torque Turbocharged 1.6L direct-injected four-cylinder: 175 horsepower and 195 pound-feet of torque The 2.0L will get a six-speed automatic as standard, while the 1.6 gets a seven-speed dual-clutch automatic. Front-wheel comes as standard, while all-wheel drive is optional. Hyundai says the Tucson goes on sale in July. Source: Hyundai Press Release is on Page 2 ALL-NEW 2016 HYUNDAI TUCSON CROSSOVER DEBUTS AT NEW YORK INTERNATIONAL AUTO SHOW Hyundai’s New Compact Crossover Offers Sporty Styling, Outstanding Efficiency and Cutting-edge Safety Technologies NEW YORK, April 1, 2015 – Hyundai today unveiled its all-new Tucson crossover utility vehicle at the New York International Auto Show. The new Tucson offers a fresh, sporty exterior and appealing interior design while making overall fuel efficiency a top priority, with significantly enhanced fuel economy ratings over the previous model. Further, the new Tucson, when equipped with Automatic Emergency Braking, is expected to receive a Top Safety Pick+ from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS). For 2016, advanced safety technologies such as Automatic Emergency Braking with pedestrian detection, Lane Departure Warning System, Blind Spot Detection, Rear Cross-traffic Alert, Lane Change Assist, Backup Warning Sensors and standard rearview camera also will be offered. The new Tucson will arrive at Hyundai dealers in July. BOLD, SCULPTED DESIGN The 2016 Tucson design employs sculpted body forms and sporty contours for an athletic, bold and striking appearance. The front view proudly presents a hexagonal-shaped grille, a key element of Hyundai’s design signature, enhanced by available high-efficiency LED twin-projector headlights, LED headlight accents and integrated LED Daytime Running Lights (DRLs). The wheelbase has been increased by more than an inch, for enhanced design proportions, interior flexibility and a smoother ride. For the first time, 19-inch alloy wheels will be offered, with a dynamic asymmetrical spoke design, surrounded by forward-raking wheel arch design. Even the door handles feature convenient approach LED lamps. The new Tucson’s roof rails are sleek and low-profile, for an integrated, functional appearance. From the rear, a Z-shaped character line above the rear wheels accentuates an aggressive, sporty side profile. The rear view conveys stability and a wide, sporty stance, for agility both on and off-road. The taillights also utilize LED technology, creating a premium design element while providing enhanced visibility from the rear. Finally, twin, bevel-cut chrome exhaust tips and a standard rear spoiler add even more sporty cues from the rear view. LARGER INTERIOR WITH PREMIUM MATERIALS On the inside, a premium, leather-wrapped instrument panel will be offered, with extra-wide instrument panel contours to enhance occupants’ overall sense of interior roominess. A leather-stitched pad is located near the driver’s right knee, for better comfort during long commutes or spirited cornering. Interior touch points have been upgraded with premium, soft-touch materials. All interior switchgear has a more refined feel during operation. The overall ambience of roominess is further enhanced by an available full-length panoramic sunroof, allowing both front and rear passengers day or night skyward visibility. The 2016 Tucson is longer, wider and has a longer wheelbase than the previous model for greater interior volume and versatility. Overall, cargo room has been increased to 31.0 cubic feet, a full five cubic feet over the previous model, with a dual-level rear cargo floor further enhancing cargo-carrying versatility. The rear liftgate opening has been enlarged in every dimension, for greater cargo flexibility. The 60/40 rear seatbacks have a greater range of adjustable recline for varying combinations of passengers and cargo, with an increased available recline of 37 degrees compared with 28 degrees for the previous model. ADVANCED, POWERFUL AND EFFICIENT NEW POWERTRAINS 2016 Tucson powertrain offerings also have been improved with top efficiency levels as a primary target. Base models offer a Nu engine family, 2.0-liter, direct-injected four-cylinder with an estimated 164 horsepower and 151 lb.-ft. of torque, coupled with a 6-speed automatic transmission. The six-speed automatic offers SHIFTRONIC™ manual shifting mode and includes an overdrive lock-up torque converter for higher fuel economy at highway speeds. Based on internal tests, fuel economy for the 2.0L FWD model is estimated at 23 (city), 31 (highway), 26 (combined). The 26-mpg combined fuel economy rating is a one-mpg improvement over the previous model. Further, powertrain NVH has been reduced through hydraulic transmission mounting and recalibrated engine mounts. Eco, Sport and Limited models offer a new, Gamma engine family, 1.6-liter turbocharged, direct-injected four-cylinder with an estimated 175 horsepower and 195 lb.-ft. of torque. Peak torque delivery starts at only 1,500 rpm and holds through 4,500 rpm, for low-RPM responsiveness and performance in everyday driving conditions. The turbocharger features low-inertia turbo-spooling response characteristics, and an electronic wastegate control for more precise control of manifold pressure. Internally, piston-cooling oil jets ensure cooler piston temperatures for enhanced engine life. Further, the Gamma engine features a new water jacket insert that automatically prioritizes cooling in the upper level of the cylinder block, where more combustion heat is generated, resulting in lower cylinder head temperatures and allowing for leaner air/fuel mixtures for better fuel efficiency. The turbo engine is coupled to a new, first-in-segment seven-speed EcoShift® dual-clutch transmission (DCT). This dual-clutch transmission offers outstanding efficiency with quick, seamless shifting and brisk acceleration. When compared with some competitors’ continuously-variable transmissions, this DCT is able to handle more torque with minimal power interruption throughout the powertrain operating range and with greater durability characteristics. Based on internal tests, estimated fuel economy for this powertrain on Eco FWD models is 26 (city), 33 (highway), 29 (combined), a 5-mpg improvement over the former Tucson 2.4L engine. Sport and Limited FWD turbo engine models are estimated at 25 (city), 30 (highway), 27 (combined), representing a 3-mpg improvement in combined fuel economy over the former Tucson 2.4L engine. In addition, the new Tucson’s fuel tank has been increased by 1.1 gallons for even greater driving range. ALL-WHEEL DRIVE CAPABILITY 2016 Tucson will offer an advanced AWD system developed by Hyundai in conjunction with Magna Powertrain. The system includes a driver-selectable AWD lock that allows a differentiated torque split between front and rear wheels, for off-road and extremely slippery road conditions. The system also includes Active Cornering Control, which automatically transfers torque to the wheels with the most traction. The system reduces understeer and enhances cornering performance by braking the inside rear wheel and delivering more torque to the outside rear wheel, providing a torque-vectoring effect. Finally, the system incorporates both Hillstart Assist and Downhill Brake Control to assist drivers facing sharp incline or decline conditions. REFINED, RESPONSIVE CHASSIS The 2016 Tucson platform offers enhanced driving dynamics with more than one inch increase in width and a 1.2 inch increase in wheelbase for greater ride comfort and linear stability. The front and rear overhangs were increased in smaller proportion to this increased wheelbase, centering more of the Tucson’s mass within the wheelbase for better handling response and control. Even more, the entire Tucson chassis is more rigid, now using more than 50 percent Advanced High Strength steel compared with 18 percent for the former model. The new Tucson also benefits from strategic use of structural adhesives at higher stress points on the chassis and more extensive use of hot-stamping methods for greater rigidity. The structure also uses four-point bushing mounts for improved comfort and reduced road noise. A world’s first shock-absorber mounting structure, the 2016 Tucson employs a dual-reinforcing panel rear wheelhouse design, which optimizes panels that are prone to vibration, resulting in a 109 percent increase in rigidity, reduced road noise levels and ride and handling improvements. The Tucson suspension has been enhanced for more precise handling without sacrificing ride comfort. The front suspension is a MacPherson strut design, with coil springs, gas-filled shock absorbers and a 24.7 mm stabilizer bar. The rear suspension is an independent, multi-link design, now with dual lower arms for both FWD and AWD, for optimal ride comfort and body control. Both front and rear suspensions use SACHS® dampers and lightweight, hollow stabilizer bars for superior body control in all driving conditions. Rear suspension control arms have been lengthened to minimize camber and toe changes throughout the suspension travel range, which has been increased to better absorb larger impacts. In addition, the jounce bumpers now use a more sophisticated, hydraulic-type design, for more refined responses over larger road impacts. Suspension bushings are now composed of a higher-dampening synthetic rubber for smoother ride characteristics when compared with conventional rubber. 2016 Tucson also offers Drive Mode Select, which allows the driver to customize their Tucson’s dynamic responses, such as steering feel, transmission and overall powertrain responsiveness to their preferences, and to changing road or traffic conditions. LOWER NVH, BETTER AERODYNAMICS To improve NVH characteristics, the 2016 Tucson has applied a number of sound dampening and insulation measures, such as: Engine mounts have been enlarged to better absorb engine vibrations Rear cross-members have changed from a direct-mount design to a bushing-mount design Sound insulation material has been added to the inner fenders, underbody, instrument panel, transmission tunnel and all cabin pillars The door latch mechanisms were extensively refined, with lower noise, pull resistance, internal friction, and greater closure damping To lower wind noise in the cabin, aerodynamics have also been improved to 0.33 Cd, a 0.02 lower coefficient of drag (Cd) than the former model Tucson’s lower coefficient of drag was achieved through a special aerodynamic design focus on the A-pillar design, rear spoiler side garnish design and underbody panels, all of which reduce air vortex and resulting aerodynamic drag. IMPROVED STEERING FEEL In addition, steering feel has been enhanced with an improved motor-driven power steering system and extensive use of lightweight, rigid aluminum for the rack assembly, for greater precision and feedback. Overall friction for the steering system has been reduced by more than 20 percent compared to the previous model. The Tucson’s motor-driven power steering is more efficient and quieter than traditional hydraulic systems by reducing parasitic losses from ancillary belts and their continual drag on the powertrain. Further, the steering system has been upgraded for more precise and rapid adjustments in steering feel with changing driving conditions. The steering wheel itself now offers a wider range of tilt and telescopic adjustment for greater driver comfort. SEGMENT FIRSTS AND NEW FEATURES The 2016 Tucson offers several compact CUV segment firsts, including ventilated front seats and YES Essentials® stain-resistant seats. Newly available features on Tucson include LED headlights and accents, LED Daytime Running Lights, HID headlights with Dynamic Bending Light (DBL) that turn-in with the direction of the steering wheel, LED map lights, color LCD cluster display, individual tire monitoring, power passenger seat and heated rear seats. The new Tucson also offers a smart power liftgate with auto-open. The smart power liftgate enables the Tucson owner to automatically open the rear liftgate, hands-free, by simply standing within a few feet of the liftgate for a few seconds with the key fob in a pocket or purse. This is especially convenient whenever the owner may be holding shopping bags or other items and needs hands-free access to the cargo area. AUDIO, NAVIGATION AND CONNECTIVITY TECHNOLOGY The new Tucson will offer a standard five-inch color LCD display with rearview camera and touchscreen function for intuitive operation. Apple Siri® “Eyes Free” integration also is now available. On the navigation-equipped Tucson, popular apps such as Pandora® Internet Radio and Yelp® are already integrated with the multimedia system. The Yelp® app has been optimized for Tucson’s eight-inch touchscreen and will help find restaurants, shopping and more. Selected restaurants will also offer reviews, ratings, hours and pricing. Once a restaurant is chosen, the navigation system can provide directions to the restaurant without even requiring passengers to input the address. For audiophiles, Tucson also offers an available 405-watt, AM/FM/SiriusXM premium audio system with eight speakers. The latest generation of SiriusXM Travel Link® with Traffic, Sports, Weather, Stocks, Fuel Prices and Movies is also available. SiriusXM’s Tune Start® allows the replay of a song from its beginning whenever a preset is selected. Additional multi-cultural channels are also available. Tucson will also offer Hyundai’s next-generation navigation system, with an advanced, eight-inch display for easy legibility. Display brightness increased by 33 percent over the former system for enhanced daytime visibility. This system’s improved touchscreen sensitivity makes it even easier to touch and drag for system inputs. The screen also now offers a split-screen display with both map and music data available simultaneously. COMPREHENSIVE SAFETY FEATURES The 2016 Tucson is expected to receive a Top Safety Pick+ rating from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) when equipped with Automatic Emergency Braking. For 2016, new, advanced safety technologies such as Automatic Emergency Braking with pedestrian detection, Lane Departure Warning System, Blind Spot Detection, Rear Cross-traffic Alert, Lane Change Assist, Backup Warning Sensors and standard rearview camera are offered. In addition, advanced high-strength steel represents over 50 percent of the new Tucson’s structure, for enhanced crash safety. The Tucson is engineered to provide its passengers with multiple defensive safety layers. The A-pillar and mirror blind spots were reduced for enhanced driver visibility. The steel unibody has integrated crumple zones and a high-tensile front sub-frame designed to work together to reduce the forces that typically reach the passenger compartment. The center pillars serve as the anchors of a ring structure which improves overall side structure stiffness while also creating more room for the door armrest and seat. All four doors also have internal guard beams to protect passengers in a side-impact collision. The entire body shell has been made stiffer and lighter thanks to extensive use of advanced high-strength steel, and the use of Tailor Welded Blanks (TWB) reinforces key structural members. TWB assemblies combine steels of different thickness and grades using a sophisticated laser welding and stamping process to achieve an optimal stiffness-to-weight ratio. TWBs reduce body weight while enhancing crash energy management. Tucson also features a standard Tire Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS) that alerts drivers if one or more tires are under-inflated, including the tire’s location. COLOR The new Tucson offers eight appealing exterior colors and three interior color environments. Six of these exterior colors are all-new, including Chromium Silver, Coliseum Gray, Ruby Wine, Mojave Sand, Sedona Sunset and Caribbean Blue. Winter White and Ash Black fill out the diverse eight-color offering. Interior color environments include black, beige and gray in cloth, and black or beige in leather, available on Limited models. NEXT-GENERATION BLUE LINK® The 2016 Tucson offers the next-generation of Hyundai Blue Link®, with enhanced safety, service and infotainment telematics. Blue Link brings seamless connectivity directly into the car with technology like remote start/stop, destination search powered by Google®, remote door lock/unlock, car finder, call roadside assistance, remote climate control and stolen vehicle recovery. Many of these features can even be controlled via the latest Android Wear ™ smartwatch offerings. In addition to these features and services, Tucson models equipped with Blue Link come standard with one year of complimentary Blue Link® Connected Care. Connected Care is a suite of safety and car care features providing Hyundai owners with free proactive services including automatic collision notification, SOS emergency assistance, enhanced roadside assistance, monthly vehicle health reporting and maintenance alerts. Blue Link is offered in three service packages: Connected Care, Remote and Guidance. Connected Care package (complimentary for 1-year): Automatic Collision Notification (ACN) and Assistance SOS Emergency Assistance Enhanced Roadside Assistance Monthly Vehicle Health Report Maintenance Alerts Automated Diagnostic Trouble Code Notification (DTC) Service Link Blue Link App (smartphone, smartwatch) On-Demand Diagnostics Driving Information Hyundai Assurance Car Care in-vehicle app Remote package: Remote Start with Climate Control Remote Door Lock/Unlock Remote Horn and Lights Car Finder via Mobile App Stolen Vehicle Recovery/Slowdown/Immobilization Vehicle Safeguard Alerts Geo-Fence Valet Alert Speed/Curfew Alert [*]Alarm Notification Guidance package: Destination search powered by Google® Destination Send-to-Car by Google®
  13. The smallest crossover in Hyundai's lineup - the Tucson - has finally gotten some much needed updates. Shown today in New York, the Tucson gets an all new sculpted body that helps it bring it into line with other Hyundai models. The front features a large, hexagonal grille and LED headlights. Around back, the Tucson has a sporty look with twin-exhaust ports, cleaned-up tailgate, and LED taillights. The interior has been simplified with an improved layout and new controls for the infotainment and climate control systems. Thanks to increase in length and width, the Tucson sees cargo space increase from 26 cubic feet to 31. There are two engines available for the 2016 Hyundai Tucson: 2.0L direct-injected four-cylinder: 164 horsepower and 151 pound-feet of torque Turbocharged 1.6L direct-injected four-cylinder: 175 horsepower and 195 pound-feet of torque The 2.0L will get a six-speed automatic as standard, while the 1.6 gets a seven-speed dual-clutch automatic. Front-wheel comes as standard, while all-wheel drive is optional. Hyundai says the Tucson goes on sale in July. Source: Hyundai Press Release is on Page 2 ALL-NEW 2016 HYUNDAI TUCSON CROSSOVER DEBUTS AT NEW YORK INTERNATIONAL AUTO SHOW Hyundai’s New Compact Crossover Offers Sporty Styling, Outstanding Efficiency and Cutting-edge Safety Technologies NEW YORK, April 1, 2015 – Hyundai today unveiled its all-new Tucson crossover utility vehicle at the New York International Auto Show. The new Tucson offers a fresh, sporty exterior and appealing interior design while making overall fuel efficiency a top priority, with significantly enhanced fuel economy ratings over the previous model. Further, the new Tucson, when equipped with Automatic Emergency Braking, is expected to receive a Top Safety Pick+ from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS). For 2016, advanced safety technologies such as Automatic Emergency Braking with pedestrian detection, Lane Departure Warning System, Blind Spot Detection, Rear Cross-traffic Alert, Lane Change Assist, Backup Warning Sensors and standard rearview camera also will be offered. The new Tucson will arrive at Hyundai dealers in July. BOLD, SCULPTED DESIGN The 2016 Tucson design employs sculpted body forms and sporty contours for an athletic, bold and striking appearance. The front view proudly presents a hexagonal-shaped grille, a key element of Hyundai’s design signature, enhanced by available high-efficiency LED twin-projector headlights, LED headlight accents and integrated LED Daytime Running Lights (DRLs). The wheelbase has been increased by more than an inch, for enhanced design proportions, interior flexibility and a smoother ride. For the first time, 19-inch alloy wheels will be offered, with a dynamic asymmetrical spoke design, surrounded by forward-raking wheel arch design. Even the door handles feature convenient approach LED lamps. The new Tucson’s roof rails are sleek and low-profile, for an integrated, functional appearance. From the rear, a Z-shaped character line above the rear wheels accentuates an aggressive, sporty side profile. The rear view conveys stability and a wide, sporty stance, for agility both on and off-road. The taillights also utilize LED technology, creating a premium design element while providing enhanced visibility from the rear. Finally, twin, bevel-cut chrome exhaust tips and a standard rear spoiler add even more sporty cues from the rear view. LARGER INTERIOR WITH PREMIUM MATERIALS On the inside, a premium, leather-wrapped instrument panel will be offered, with extra-wide instrument panel contours to enhance occupants’ overall sense of interior roominess. A leather-stitched pad is located near the driver’s right knee, for better comfort during long commutes or spirited cornering. Interior touch points have been upgraded with premium, soft-touch materials. All interior switchgear has a more refined feel during operation. The overall ambience of roominess is further enhanced by an available full-length panoramic sunroof, allowing both front and rear passengers day or night skyward visibility. The 2016 Tucson is longer, wider and has a longer wheelbase than the previous model for greater interior volume and versatility. Overall, cargo room has been increased to 31.0 cubic feet, a full five cubic feet over the previous model, with a dual-level rear cargo floor further enhancing cargo-carrying versatility. The rear liftgate opening has been enlarged in every dimension, for greater cargo flexibility. The 60/40 rear seatbacks have a greater range of adjustable recline for varying combinations of passengers and cargo, with an increased available recline of 37 degrees compared with 28 degrees for the previous model. ADVANCED, POWERFUL AND EFFICIENT NEW POWERTRAINS 2016 Tucson powertrain offerings also have been improved with top efficiency levels as a primary target. Base models offer a Nu engine family, 2.0-liter, direct-injected four-cylinder with an estimated 164 horsepower and 151 lb.-ft. of torque, coupled with a 6-speed automatic transmission. The six-speed automatic offers SHIFTRONIC™ manual shifting mode and includes an overdrive lock-up torque converter for higher fuel economy at highway speeds. Based on internal tests, fuel economy for the 2.0L FWD model is estimated at 23 (city), 31 (highway), 26 (combined). The 26-mpg combined fuel economy rating is a one-mpg improvement over the previous model. Further, powertrain NVH has been reduced through hydraulic transmission mounting and recalibrated engine mounts. Eco, Sport and Limited models offer a new, Gamma engine family, 1.6-liter turbocharged, direct-injected four-cylinder with an estimated 175 horsepower and 195 lb.-ft. of torque. Peak torque delivery starts at only 1,500 rpm and holds through 4,500 rpm, for low-RPM responsiveness and performance in everyday driving conditions. The turbocharger features low-inertia turbo-spooling response characteristics, and an electronic wastegate control for more precise control of manifold pressure. Internally, piston-cooling oil jets ensure cooler piston temperatures for enhanced engine life. Further, the Gamma engine features a new water jacket insert that automatically prioritizes cooling in the upper level of the cylinder block, where more combustion heat is generated, resulting in lower cylinder head temperatures and allowing for leaner air/fuel mixtures for better fuel efficiency. The turbo engine is coupled to a new, first-in-segment seven-speed EcoShift® dual-clutch transmission (DCT). This dual-clutch transmission offers outstanding efficiency with quick, seamless shifting and brisk acceleration. When compared with some competitors’ continuously-variable transmissions, this DCT is able to handle more torque with minimal power interruption throughout the powertrain operating range and with greater durability characteristics. Based on internal tests, estimated fuel economy for this powertrain on Eco FWD models is 26 (city), 33 (highway), 29 (combined), a 5-mpg improvement over the former Tucson 2.4L engine. Sport and Limited FWD turbo engine models are estimated at 25 (city), 30 (highway), 27 (combined), representing a 3-mpg improvement in combined fuel economy over the former Tucson 2.4L engine. In addition, the new Tucson’s fuel tank has been increased by 1.1 gallons for even greater driving range. ALL-WHEEL DRIVE CAPABILITY 2016 Tucson will offer an advanced AWD system developed by Hyundai in conjunction with Magna Powertrain. The system includes a driver-selectable AWD lock that allows a differentiated torque split between front and rear wheels, for off-road and extremely slippery road conditions. The system also includes Active Cornering Control, which automatically transfers torque to the wheels with the most traction. The system reduces understeer and enhances cornering performance by braking the inside rear wheel and delivering more torque to the outside rear wheel, providing a torque-vectoring effect. Finally, the system incorporates both Hillstart Assist and Downhill Brake Control to assist drivers facing sharp incline or decline conditions. REFINED, RESPONSIVE CHASSIS The 2016 Tucson platform offers enhanced driving dynamics with more than one inch increase in width and a 1.2 inch increase in wheelbase for greater ride comfort and linear stability. The front and rear overhangs were increased in smaller proportion to this increased wheelbase, centering more of the Tucson’s mass within the wheelbase for better handling response and control. Even more, the entire Tucson chassis is more rigid, now using more than 50 percent Advanced High Strength steel compared with 18 percent for the former model. The new Tucson also benefits from strategic use of structural adhesives at higher stress points on the chassis and more extensive use of hot-stamping methods for greater rigidity. The structure also uses four-point bushing mounts for improved comfort and reduced road noise. A world’s first shock-absorber mounting structure, the 2016 Tucson employs a dual-reinforcing panel rear wheelhouse design, which optimizes panels that are prone to vibration, resulting in a 109 percent increase in rigidity, reduced road noise levels and ride and handling improvements. The Tucson suspension has been enhanced for more precise handling without sacrificing ride comfort. The front suspension is a MacPherson strut design, with coil springs, gas-filled shock absorbers and a 24.7 mm stabilizer bar. The rear suspension is an independent, multi-link design, now with dual lower arms for both FWD and AWD, for optimal ride comfort and body control. Both front and rear suspensions use SACHS® dampers and lightweight, hollow stabilizer bars for superior body control in all driving conditions. Rear suspension control arms have been lengthened to minimize camber and toe changes throughout the suspension travel range, which has been increased to better absorb larger impacts. In addition, the jounce bumpers now use a more sophisticated, hydraulic-type design, for more refined responses over larger road impacts. Suspension bushings are now composed of a higher-dampening synthetic rubber for smoother ride characteristics when compared with conventional rubber. 2016 Tucson also offers Drive Mode Select, which allows the driver to customize their Tucson’s dynamic responses, such as steering feel, transmission and overall powertrain responsiveness to their preferences, and to changing road or traffic conditions. LOWER NVH, BETTER AERODYNAMICS To improve NVH characteristics, the 2016 Tucson has applied a number of sound dampening and insulation measures, such as: Engine mounts have been enlarged to better absorb engine vibrations Rear cross-members have changed from a direct-mount design to a bushing-mount design Sound insulation material has been added to the inner fenders, underbody, instrument panel, transmission tunnel and all cabin pillars The door latch mechanisms were extensively refined, with lower noise, pull resistance, internal friction, and greater closure damping To lower wind noise in the cabin, aerodynamics have also been improved to 0.33 Cd, a 0.02 lower coefficient of drag (Cd) than the former model Tucson’s lower coefficient of drag was achieved through a special aerodynamic design focus on the A-pillar design, rear spoiler side garnish design and underbody panels, all of which reduce air vortex and resulting aerodynamic drag. IMPROVED STEERING FEEL In addition, steering feel has been enhanced with an improved motor-driven power steering system and extensive use of lightweight, rigid aluminum for the rack assembly, for greater precision and feedback. Overall friction for the steering system has been reduced by more than 20 percent compared to the previous model. The Tucson’s motor-driven power steering is more efficient and quieter than traditional hydraulic systems by reducing parasitic losses from ancillary belts and their continual drag on the powertrain. Further, the steering system has been upgraded for more precise and rapid adjustments in steering feel with changing driving conditions. The steering wheel itself now offers a wider range of tilt and telescopic adjustment for greater driver comfort. SEGMENT FIRSTS AND NEW FEATURES The 2016 Tucson offers several compact CUV segment firsts, including ventilated front seats and YES Essentials® stain-resistant seats. Newly available features on Tucson include LED headlights and accents, LED Daytime Running Lights, HID headlights with Dynamic Bending Light (DBL) that turn-in with the direction of the steering wheel, LED map lights, color LCD cluster display, individual tire monitoring, power passenger seat and heated rear seats. The new Tucson also offers a smart power liftgate with auto-open. The smart power liftgate enables the Tucson owner to automatically open the rear liftgate, hands-free, by simply standing within a few feet of the liftgate for a few seconds with the key fob in a pocket or purse. This is especially convenient whenever the owner may be holding shopping bags or other items and needs hands-free access to the cargo area. AUDIO, NAVIGATION AND CONNECTIVITY TECHNOLOGY The new Tucson will offer a standard five-inch color LCD display with rearview camera and touchscreen function for intuitive operation. Apple Siri® “Eyes Free” integration also is now available. On the navigation-equipped Tucson, popular apps such as Pandora® Internet Radio and Yelp® are already integrated with the multimedia system. The Yelp® app has been optimized for Tucson’s eight-inch touchscreen and will help find restaurants, shopping and more. Selected restaurants will also offer reviews, ratings, hours and pricing. Once a restaurant is chosen, the navigation system can provide directions to the restaurant without even requiring passengers to input the address. For audiophiles, Tucson also offers an available 405-watt, AM/FM/SiriusXM premium audio system with eight speakers. The latest generation of SiriusXM Travel Link® with Traffic, Sports, Weather, Stocks, Fuel Prices and Movies is also available. SiriusXM’s Tune Start® allows the replay of a song from its beginning whenever a preset is selected. Additional multi-cultural channels are also available. Tucson will also offer Hyundai’s next-generation navigation system, with an advanced, eight-inch display for easy legibility. Display brightness increased by 33 percent over the former system for enhanced daytime visibility. This system’s improved touchscreen sensitivity makes it even easier to touch and drag for system inputs. The screen also now offers a split-screen display with both map and music data available simultaneously. COMPREHENSIVE SAFETY FEATURES The 2016 Tucson is expected to receive a Top Safety Pick+ rating from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) when equipped with Automatic Emergency Braking. For 2016, new, advanced safety technologies such as Automatic Emergency Braking with pedestrian detection, Lane Departure Warning System, Blind Spot Detection, Rear Cross-traffic Alert, Lane Change Assist, Backup Warning Sensors and standard rearview camera are offered. In addition, advanced high-strength steel represents over 50 percent of the new Tucson’s structure, for enhanced crash safety. The Tucson is engineered to provide its passengers with multiple defensive safety layers. The A-pillar and mirror blind spots were reduced for enhanced driver visibility. The steel unibody has integrated crumple zones and a high-tensile front sub-frame designed to work together to reduce the forces that typically reach the passenger compartment. The center pillars serve as the anchors of a ring structure which improves overall side structure stiffness while also creating more room for the door armrest and seat. All four doors also have internal guard beams to protect passengers in a side-impact collision. The entire body shell has been made stiffer and lighter thanks to extensive use of advanced high-strength steel, and the use of Tailor Welded Blanks (TWB) reinforces key structural members. TWB assemblies combine steels of different thickness and grades using a sophisticated laser welding and stamping process to achieve an optimal stiffness-to-weight ratio. TWBs reduce body weight while enhancing crash energy management. Tucson also features a standard Tire Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS) that alerts drivers if one or more tires are under-inflated, including the tire’s location. COLOR The new Tucson offers eight appealing exterior colors and three interior color environments. Six of these exterior colors are all-new, including Chromium Silver, Coliseum Gray, Ruby Wine, Mojave Sand, Sedona Sunset and Caribbean Blue. Winter White and Ash Black fill out the diverse eight-color offering. Interior color environments include black, beige and gray in cloth, and black or beige in leather, available on Limited models. NEXT-GENERATION BLUE LINK® The 2016 Tucson offers the next-generation of Hyundai Blue Link®, with enhanced safety, service and infotainment telematics. Blue Link brings seamless connectivity directly into the car with technology like remote start/stop, destination search powered by Google®, remote door lock/unlock, car finder, call roadside assistance, remote climate control and stolen vehicle recovery. Many of these features can even be controlled via the latest Android Wear ™ smartwatch offerings. In addition to these features and services, Tucson models equipped with Blue Link come standard with one year of complimentary Blue Link® Connected Care. Connected Care is a suite of safety and car care features providing Hyundai owners with free proactive services including automatic collision notification, SOS emergency assistance, enhanced roadside assistance, monthly vehicle health reporting and maintenance alerts. Blue Link is offered in three service packages: Connected Care, Remote and Guidance. Connected Care package (complimentary for 1-year): Automatic Collision Notification (ACN) and Assistance SOS Emergency Assistance Enhanced Roadside Assistance Monthly Vehicle Health Report Maintenance Alerts Automated Diagnostic Trouble Code Notification (DTC) Service Link Blue Link App (smartphone, smartwatch) On-Demand Diagnostics Driving Information Hyundai Assurance Car Care in-vehicle app Remote package: Remote Start with Climate Control Remote Door Lock/Unlock Remote Horn and Lights Car Finder via Mobile App Stolen Vehicle Recovery/Slowdown/Immobilization Vehicle Safeguard Alerts Geo-Fence Valet Alert Speed/Curfew Alert [*]Alarm Notification Guidance package: Destination search powered by Google® Destination Send-to-Car by Google® View full article
  14. G. David Felt Alternative Fuels & Propulsion writer www.CheersandGears.com Tucson Fuel Cell Leases Start! Hyundai started today leasing the Tucson Fuel Cell CUV in California. These leases include fuel and maintenance for 36 months. The first one rolled off the lot according to Hyundai this morning. 36 – Month Lease $2,999 due at lease signing $499 a month The Tucson is rated at 265 mile range on a tank full of Hydrogen. It takes 10 minutes to fully fuel the Tucson compared to current EVs that can take from 30 min with a level 3 charger to 14 plus hours on a 110V charging system. California is allowing those with Fuel Cell auto’s to use the HOV lanes. Hyundai for the life of the lease will come to you were ever you are to pick up the auto for maintenance and return it with a full tank and detailed. Hyundai gives the following powertrain information: Powertrain 134HP @ 5000 rpm 221lb feet of torque @ 1000 rpm Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cell with 12.4lb tank capacity at 10,000psi Fuel Cell Power 100kW Electric motor 100kW Battery type Li-Polymer Performance Maximum speed 100mph 0-62 mph 12.5 seconds Single speed Transmission FWD MPG 49 / 51 / 50 = City / Highway / Combined Dimensions Overall Length – 173.6 inches Overall Height – 65.2 inches Overall Width – 71.7 inches Head Room – 39.4 inches front, 39.1 inches rear Safety Features VSM – Vehicle Stability Management ESC – Electronic Stability Control TCS – Traction Control System ABS – Anti-lock Braking System BA – Brake Assist HAC – Hillstart Assist Control SRS – Advanced dual front airbags SRS – Duel front seat-mounted side-impact airbags For more details on how their car works and further questions with answers check out their new web page. https://www.hyundaiusa.com/tucsonfuelcell?cid=sem&k_clickid=61cce0c1-5aac-3209-5a71-0000515618f1

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