Drew Dowdell

Mazda and Hybrids

9 posts in this topic

It seems to me that Mazda could be in a unique position in the world of hybrids.

Some points to consider:

1. It's entirely plausible to have a car who's only means of propulsion is via electric motors; Tesla and the Electric Mini have proven that.

2. Generators work their best at a consistent, generally high, RPM.

3. Rotary engines are their most efficient at a high rpm.

4. Rotary engines are very smooth running.

What I'm suggesting here is mating a small displacement rotary engine, probably less than 1 litre, to a generator to charge the batteries. Batteries in turn run the electric motors <in the wheels like with the Electric Mini> of moderate power. The rotary/generator only fires up and runs when the batteries need to be topped off. Throw in a plug in feature for when the car is parked and the lithium ion battery technology from Tesla, and I see the potential for a good performing vehicle that can get 50+ mpg with a very unobtrusive, compact, power train.

Now, I've never driven a rotary powered car, I don't know how they'd react to being started and stopped like they would be in a hybrid situation.

What do you guys think?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It seems to me that Mazda could be in a unique position in the world of hybrids.

Some points to consider:

1. It's entirely plausible to have a car who's only means of propulsion is via electric motors; Tesla and the Electric Mini have proven that.

2. Generators work their best at a consistent, generally high, RPM.

3. Rotary engines are their most efficient at a high rpm.

4. Rotary engines are very smooth running.

What I'm suggesting here is mating a small displacement rotary engine, probably less than 1 litre, to a generator to charge the batteries. Batteries in turn run the electric motors <in the wheels like with the Electric Mini> of moderate power. The rotary/generator only fires up and runs when the batteries need to be topped off. Throw in a plug in feature for when the car is parked and the lithium ion battery technology from Tesla, and I see the potential for a good performing vehicle that can get 50+ mpg with a very unobtrusive, compact, power train.

Now, I've never driven a rotary powered car, I don't know how they'd react to being started and stopped like they would be in a hybrid situation.

What do you guys think?

So... basically the Volt with a rotary, right?

The only problem with the rotary design is that it eats more oil than most engines. That doesn't bother sports car buyers, but it would probably bother hybrid buyers.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So... basically the Volt with a rotary, right?

The only problem with the rotary design is that it eats more oil than most engines. That doesn't bother sports car buyers, but it would probably bother hybrid buyers.

Almost... except using wheel hub electric motors instead.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't see why not...

You'd have to watch the oil though....

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't rotaries have a problem with emissions and fuel consumption too?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

speaking of mazda and fuel economy

Mazda Develops New Naturally-Aspirated MZR 1.3-liter Miller-cycle Engine; 20% Improvement in Fuel Economy

31 May 2007

Posted Image The new engine will power the new Mazda2 (Demio). Mazda Motor Corporation has developed a new, naturally aspirated MZR 1.3-liter Miller-cycle gasoline engine, which will power the all-new Demio (Mazda2 in non-Japanese markets) when it goes on sale in Japan in July 2007.

In combination with Mazda’s first continuously variable transmission (CVT), the engine enables the new Demio to offer a 10-15 mode fuel economy of 23.0 km/liter (4.3 l/100km or 54 mpg US), an improvement of approximately 20% over the 19.2 km/liter (5.2 l/100km, 45 mpg US) rating of the current 1.3-liter engine

rest of article here plus short mention of rotary engine at end of article

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't rotaries have a problem with emissions and fuel consumption too?

True. The one saving grace might be packaging advantages as the rotary is compact.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

True. The one saving grace might be packaging advantages as the rotary is compact.

True. A series hybrid will need all the underhood room it can get. The hood on the Volt looks almost as long as the Impala.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

Guest
You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
Reply to this topic...

×   You have pasted content with formatting.   Remove formatting

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor