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mustang84

Industrial fallout and car paint

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Today I was cleaning the wheels on my car to avoid them getting pitted out from all the salt and sand that have been put on the roads lately, when I noticed dozens of little rust spots all over the side bodywork of the car. I freaked. I had spent so much time over the summer claying and waxing, trying to get it prepared for winter, and there were these tiny pin drop rust spots everywhere.

I started running through my mind what could have caused it and decided it was probably all the salt they have been putting on the roads lately. So I took it into the garage and started wiping it down with Fast Wax to remove salt residue and found out it was also removing most of the spots.

Later tonight, I went inside and found out the rust is probably not due to salt, but from fallout (metal particles from rail dust, industrial fabrication, power plants, snow plows). The fallout only became visible recently, so I'm guessing it is from snow plows. I also park next to a rail track, but I am in a parking garage 5 stories up so I doubt the rail dust could travel up that high. And I do drive over at least one railroad track a day, so I don't know if particles are kicked up as I drive over it.

Has anyone dealt with fallout on their vehicle's paint before? I have read that you use an acidic compound and equalizer to prevent the fallout from "re-blooming," but I would be a little leery about doing it the wrong way and damaging the paint.

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You might want to look into a Valuguard "ABC" system... I haven't tried it, but I've read about it on teh internets...

ValuGard Neutralization System

Vehcile manufacturer studies have shown that failure to remove environmental contaminants from paint film can cause premature degradation of the paint system. While clay products are useful for overspray, they cannot deep clean the surface and pores of the paint. This can only be accomplished through a thorough chemical cleaning. The ValuGard Neutralization System is the most recognized and approved chemical neutralization system in the industry. In fact, major auto manufactures have issued technical service bulletins/advisories directing their dealers and port operations to use the ValuGard System for required repairs and pre-treatment for acid rain and industrial fallout repairs. Safe for both the user and the environment, the ValuGard Neutralization System is VOC compliant and uses no carcinogenic or toxic components. Economical to use.

Acid Neutralizer - Step I

Acid Neutralizer removes all waxes, sealant, silicones, road grime, lot stains and storage stains. Neutralizes acids deposited on the paint surface and in the pores of the paint during transportation and storage. Removes lot stains and wax build-up. Excellent pre-wash for body shops - removes silicones, waxes and other contaminates before sanding. Saves time when applied to used vehicles, removes oxidation, reduces buff time.

Alkaline Neutralizer - Step II

The second step of our Neutralization System, Alkaline Neutralizer deep-cleans painted surfaces to remove alkaline deposits. Also dissolves ferrous metal particles (rail dust) while breaking their bond to the paint so that they safely and easily float away.

Detail Wash - Step III

The third step in our neutralization process, Detail Wash is a fine vehicle wash solution designed to return the paint to its original factory pH level. A true neutral carwash shampoo - not a soap - it will not strip waxes or sealants and is safe for use on all painted surfaces, trim and wheels. Excellent for everyday use, Detail Wash produces super long-lasting suds that remove dirt without stripping waxes, polishes or sealants. 128:1 super concentrate. VOC compliant.

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Parking near a railroad track is likely the source of your problem, that stuff can fly pretty far and high. Your clay bar won't take care of it? Clay bar is what we used to remove it from brand new cars back in the day. Just keep turning the clay so it doesn't scratch as it removes the particles.

Edited by ocnblu
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Parking near a railroad track is likely the source of your problem, that stuff can fly pretty far and high. Your clay bar won't take care of it? Clay bar is what we used to remove it from brand new cars back in the day. Just keep turning the clay so it doesn't scratch as it removes the particles.

Clay bar is the ticket, always. Whether it be a well used vehicle or one brand new--I couldn't believe the grit I got out of mom's month old, just delivered '08 Malibu paint 2 years ago--there's almost always some debris. Especially the stuff that looks like rust, and ends up freaking people out on their new vehicles, especially light colored ones. Clay bar & it should be gone.

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