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William Maley

Industry News: U.S. Department of Energy Steps Away From 1 Million EV Goal In 2015

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By William Maley

Staff Writer - CheersandGears.com

February 3, 2013

The U.S. Department of Energy announced a updated strategy to promote green cars and lower the costs over the next nine years at the Washington D.C. Auto Show on Thursday. One part of the original strategy which stated a goal of having a million electric vehicles on the road by 2015 has been eased off.

"Whether we meet that goal in 2015 or 2016, that's less important than that we're on the right path to get many millions of these vehicles on the road," said a Department of Energy official.

Auto experts say the strategy is more realistic since consumers aren't fully sold on electric vehicles due to the high cost, recharge times, and limited charging infrastructure in the U.S.

The DOE is backing a new plan to promote research into lithium-ion battery tech to help lower costs.

Source: Reuters

William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.com or you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster.


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Hello Moron Politicians, We need a natural and logical next step. Since people talk about the power of energy in a gallon of gas, the logical next step is CNG or Compressed Natural Gas. This is the only thing that would get us off Oil, burns far cleaner (GREEN) and allows people to drive all over without the long wait times of charging.

Some day Electric will be the new norm, but now it is inner city only driving and the real bulk of people should move to CNG for superior clean autos.

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*we can't meet our own expectations*.... "hey guys we did it, we're on the right track!"
same lame expectations and consequences essentially produced by coercion.

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