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William Maley

July 2013: American Honda Motor Co

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TORRANCE, Calif., Aug. 1, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- American Honda Motor Co., Inc. today reported July 2013 U.S. sales of 141,439 units, a total increase of 20.9 percent compared with July 2012 (up 16.1 percent based on the Daily Selling Rate, or DSR*). The Honda Division posted July 2013 sales of 126,289 units, an increase of 21.3 percent compared with July 2012. Acura Division U.S. July sales of 15,150 units jumped 18.1 percent compared with July 2012.

Honda

  • Accord and Civic both top 30,000 July sales, with Civic breaking a 13-year-old July sales record
  • CR-V breaks July sales record set last year by more than 6,500 units, with sales of 27,226, up 32.5 percent compared to July 2012
  • Pilot and Ridgeline both see fifth consecutive month of double digit sales gains, up 32.5 and 67.7 percent respectively, from July 2012

"In July, all of our core models - Civic, Accord, Odyssey and CRV - showed double-digit gains," said John Mendel, executive vice president of sales at American Honda. "This indicates Honda's commitment to retail sales is resonating with consumers seeking not only fun and fuel-efficient vehicles, but also products that retain their long-term value."

Acura

  • Acura posts a 18.1-percent sales gain, and a 35.4-percent gain in light-truck sales setting an all-time light-truck sales record
  • MDX, new from the ground up, topped 5,500 units and set a new July record last set in 2005, making it Acura's top-selling model
  • RDX continues its amazing run with 15 consecutive month of record sales (3,936 units sold)

"The all-new MDX is off to the kind of dominating start we expected, teamed with RDX to give Acura a powerful 1-2 punch in the important luxury light-truck segment, and new momentum in Acura showrooms," said Jeff Conrad, vice president and general manager of Acura sales. "MDX delivers due to its fundamental advantages in areas that resonate with luxury SUV shoppers."

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