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Mercedes Benze C350 PLUG-IN HYBRID

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G. David Felt
Alternative Fuels & Propulsion writer
www.CheersandGears.com

 

C350 PLUG-IN HYBRID

 

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MERCEDES-BENZ C350 PLUG-IN HYBRID
The C350 Plug-In delivers 134.5 MPG, CO2 emits only 48 g/km and 19 miles is how much it can travel on electric power alone.
 
So the question for this introduction at the Detroit Autoshow:
Is it worth it? Does it make sense to have an auto that has so limited electric range as a plug-in even though with generator you can say you average 134.5 MPG?
 
The best part of this is it makes the Chevy VOLT a Bargain that is superior to this MB.
What are your thoughts? Would you spend money on this car?

 

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Top Gear just did an update as they reviewed last years C350 Plug-in and so they posted these details about the Detroit info from MB.

 

DRIVETRAIN SPECIFICATIONS
Internal combustion engine   Number of cylinders/arrangement 4 in-line Mixture formation High-pressure injection, 1 turbocharger Displacement (cc) 1991 Rated output 208 HP @ 5,500 RPM Rated torque 258 LB-FT Electric motor   Output (kW) max. 60 Torque 251 LB-FT System output (kW/hp) 205/279 System torque 442 LB-FT Acceleration 0-62 mph (s) 5.9 (6.2) Top speed (km/h) 250 (246) Top speed electric (km/h) 130 Fuel consumption (combined) from (l/100 km) 2.1 (2.1) Combined CO2 emissions from (g/km) 48 (49) Efficiency class A+ Electric range (km) 31 Total battery capacity (kWh) 6.2 Charge time 10%-100% (230/8 A -16 A), 1.8-3.7 kW(h) 1.75 – 3.5

 

So 31 km range equals 19.3 miles. Supposed to go on sale in the US at just under $50,000 dollars. 

 

I personally think this is a Joke and waste of money. Clearly they need a better battery solution and Top Speed says they believe it will only be around 100 MPG rather than the MB market speech of 134.5 MPG based on current testing of their hybrids.

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Wait- why isn't this badged a "C190" again?

Agree on why is this badged what it is.

 

Bigger question is why with a battery pack that is half the size of the VOLT. Why not give it a better size battery to at least have 40-50 miles on Pure electric?

 

BMW is also doing the same thing, less HP and Torque at this version but the 328e is supposed to get 22 miles per pure charge.

 

Not sure why German thinking is so limited on the Pure Electric range.

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I would have thought it would be called C300 Plug in, because it is a C300 4-cylinder, but whatever.  I think it could be good vale, I would need to see the price and options that come with it.  But it is faster than a C300, and obviously will save on gas, and 20 miles of electric only isn't bad because you aren't going to drive it in electric only mode unless in traffic or maybe highway cruise.  When accelerating you'll need the gas engine.   They aren't trying to make a full electric like the i3 or Tesla, or even a Volt that is an electric car with a range extender. 

 

This is the second of 10 plug-in hybrids that are coming, the S-class plug in is on sale in Europe, on sale here in spring.  They must figure it will sell if they are making 10 of them.

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I would have thought it would be called C300 Plug in, because it is a C300 4-cylinder, but whatever.  I think it could be good vale, I would need to see the price and options that come with it.  But it is faster than a C300, and obviously will save on gas, and 20 miles of electric only isn't bad because you aren't going to drive it in electric only mode unless in traffic or maybe highway cruise.  When accelerating you'll need the gas engine.   They aren't trying to make a full electric like the i3 or Tesla, or even a Volt that is an electric car with a range extender. 

 

This is the second of 10 plug-in hybrids that are coming, the S-class plug in is on sale in Europe, on sale here in spring.  They must figure it will sell if they are making 10 of them.

OK SMK you have to clearly state some REAL FACTS TO JUSTIFY a almost $50K dollar car that cannot even cover a single days commute unless you only live in the city.

 

This car is like a Prius Using pure electric mode for 19 miles and then combined electric / gas engine.

 

Sad is they showed this in the S550e and MB even states they are using the same Hybrid system in all 10 of their new hybrid auto's. So their cheap ass Chevy version of a hybrid is the same as their superior S class. So yes the S550e gets a V6 where the C350e gets a 2 liter 4 banger.

 

MBG should have at least made the auto's with a decent battery pack to cover 30-40 miles, then at least you have a proper commute covered for people.

 

To me, MB Hybrid strategy is showing how cheap they are becoming to try and sell in every market everywhere and clearly they have no real technology to compete against what Toyota or GM is doing.

 

I am thinking the German days of technology might be coming to an end especially due to the over paid kill a business unions of that Country.

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The justification for the price is that a V6 C-class is $50k. And while the hybrid gives up 1 second in 0-60 time it is basically doubling fuel economy.

You could spend near $50k on an Acura, Lincoln, ATS/CTS etc that has a 0-60 time near 6 seconds and not the interior that the C-class has, and won't get the fuel economy of the C350e.

If you were already going to spend $45,000 on a C300, I think a few thousand extra is worth more performance and economy. But as I said I'd have to see how the pricing was. Personally I'd rather have the bi-turbo V6 over the hybrid if they are the same money.

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While you guys are arguing about range... here is the number that stands out to me...

 

" 442 LB-FT"  That is more than a GM 5.3 liter V8 and almost the same as the GM 6.2 liter V8. 

 

I'm sure in something as small as a C-Class, it makes it feel like it's pulling like a locomotive.

 

I've seen the electric motor they're using in this... it's about 30% of a Tesla motor.

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It is a massive amount of torque, it might beat that 0-60 in 5.9 seconds estimate, because the C400 can do 0-60 in 4.8 seconds with the V6.  For me I'd have to see the performance data and fuel costs and pricing of the C350 plug in and compare to the C400 V6, or ATS V6 or 335i or other near $50k cars.

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