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William Maley

2014 Review Wrap-Up; 2014 Toyota Sienna XLE

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Oh Toyota. I’m not sure who was it at the company who decided to market the Sienna with ‘Swagger Wagon’ tagline, because at first I thought it was kind of crazy. The tagline first appeared in an ad featuring the van and two parents rapping. At first I thought someone at the marketing department was having a YOLO moment. But the crazy thing was it worked. People took notice of the Sienna and began to put on their list of vehicles to look at. So when a Sienna XLE came in for week’s review, I wondered if there was something to this van or if the tagline Toyota had created was only promoting something mediocre.

You can’t miss the Sienna due to how big it it. With measurements of 200.2 inches for overall length and 78.2 inches for overall width, the Sienna has to be the biggest minivan on sale. It also looks like Toyota did some rummaging from other vehicles in their lineup as the front grille looks to come from the Venza crossover, while the rear tailgate appears to come from one of Toyota’s large SUVs. The Sienna isn’t the the ugliest minivan on sale, but it isn’t the best looking either.

2014 Toyota Sienna XLE AWD 11

Heading inside and its apparent Toyota has done a lot to make the Sienna feel more like a luxury car than a minivan. My XLE tester featured a leather interior with heated seats for the front passengers; Toyota’s Entune infotainment system, tri-zone climate control, backup camera, and a rear infotainment system. Controls are within easy reach for the radio and climate control, though I had to remind myself to look at the top of dash to the trip computer to see where I set the temperature and fan speed. Bit of an odd choice to put it there and not on the infotainment screen. Second row passengers get captain chairs with the ability to recline with a foot rest. My brother named the seats the ‘kickass seats’ and the idea of them are kickass. In practice, the idea falls short as you won’t be able to fully recline with the footrest because there isn’t enough space in the van to pull this off. Even with the seat fully back, there isn’t enough space. If Toyota was to do a Sienna XL or Grand version which adds a few more inches to the length, it might be plausible. At least head and legroom for both second and third row passengers are very generous. Cargo space is right in the midpack with the Sienna offering 39.1 cubic feet with all three rows up and 150 cubic feet with the third row folded and the second row removed.

Power comes from Toyota’s venerable 3.5L V6 with 266 horsepower and 245 horsepower. It can be paired with front-wheel or my tester’s all-wheel drive system. Both drivetrains feature a six-speed automatic. The V6 is very much able to hold its own in the Sienna as power was abundant and was able to get the van up to speed in no problem. The six-speed automatic delivers smooth $h!s, while the optional all-wheel drive keeps the vehicle on the road with almost no hint that its working. Fuel economy for the Sienna XLE AWD is rated at 16 City/23 Highway/19 Combined. My week average landed around 18 MPG.

The Sienna’s ride is what you would expect in a minivan; a suspension that has been tuned for coddling its occupants with nary a bump or road imperfection. This does mean the Sienna rolls when cornering, but then again this isn’t meant to a sports car. Noise levels are kept to a decent level in day to day driving, though freeway driving does bring in a bit more road noise than any other minivan I have driven.

So while the ‘swagger wagon’ tagline may make some people scratch their heads, it does give a light to the Sienna which I think is one of the best vans I have driven yet. It has more than enough luxuries and space for you and your passengers to enjoy wherever they are going, along with a ride that makes you feel you’re in a luxury car. Win win in my book.

Disclaimer: Toyota Provided the Sienna, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas

Year: 2014

Make: Toyota

Model: Sienna

Trim: XLE AWD

Engine: 3.5L DOHC 24-Valve V6

Driveline: Six-Speed Automatic, All-Wheel Drive

Horsepower @ RPM: 266 @ 6,200

Torque @ RPM: 245 @ 4,700

Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 16/23/19

Curb Weight: 4,735 lbs

Location of Manufacture: Princeton, Indiana

Base Price: $36,185

As Tested Price: $40,322 (Includes $860.00 Destination Charge)

Options:

XLE Navigation Package with Entune App Suite - $1,735.00

Blind Spot Monitor with Rear Cross-Traffic Alert - $500.00

XM Satellite Radio - $449.00

Carpet Floor Mats w/Door Sill Protector - $330.00

Roof Rack Cross Bars - $185.00

Cargo Net - $49.00

First Aid Kit - $29.00


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I always found the suspension in these to be way too wobbly, but I drove it when this body first came out.  I wonder if it's tightened up since then... any looser and it would be melting jello.

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      View full article
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      Torque @ RPM: 306 @ 2,000 - 4,800
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 22/28/24
      Curb Weight: 4,044 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Cassino, Italy
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      View full article
    • By William Maley
      (Author’s Note: Before you ask, no this isn’t a typo. I really did drive a 2017 Tacoma in 2018. Due to some circumstances, the Tacoma took the place of another vehicle at the last minute. I didn’t realize it was a 2017 model until I saw the sticker. I’ll make note of the changes for 2018 towards the end of the piece.)
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      Make: Toyota
      Model: Tacoma Double Cab with Long Bed
      Trim: TRD Off-Road
      Engine: 3.5L D-4S V6 with Dual VVT-i 
      Driveline: Six-Speed Automatic, Four-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 278 @ 6,000
      Torque @ RPM: 265 @ 4,600 
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 18/23/20
      Curb Weight: 4,480 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: San Antonio, TX
      Base Price: $35,515
      As Tested Price: $40,617 (Includes $960.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
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      Tonneau Cover - $650.00
      Carpet Floor Mats w/Door Sill Protector - $208.00
      Mudguards - $129.00
      Bed Mat - $120.00
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