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Auto CEO Compensation

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G. David Felt
Staff Writer Alternative Energy - www.CheersandGears.com

 

Auto CEO Compensation

 

CNBC with Reuters has posted CEO compensation for GM, FCA, and FORD for 2015 and clearly also points out GM CEO Barra's compensation jumps 72% to $28 Million for 2016.
 
2015 Compensation
 
GM CEO Barra - $7.3 Million on $152.4 Billion in sales, $10.8 EBIT earnings.
FCA CEO Marchionne - $73.6 million 
FORD CEO Field $18.6 million 
 
Course stock does make up a large percentage of the pay package, but it is interesting to see what they are paid.
 

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Sergio is over compensated by about $70 million.  I think a lot of CEO's in a lot of companies are overpaid.  If you are like a Steve Jobs who is CEO and inventor, then you are worth every dime, because he was developing the product that was making the money.  But for the caretaker of the throne type CEO's that make $25 million then complain that they can't pay workers more than $10 an hour because profits will go down, I think they are full of crap.    That is for all industries, not just auto.

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^^^^^ +1 as I totally agree with you SMK about Sergio being way over paid. Most really are. They could grow companies so much more if they kept their pay reasonable and actually shared the profit with the employees who would most likely work harder if they know they get a portion of the profit from the company performing well.

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Sergio is over compensated by about $70 million.  I think a lot of CEO's in a lot of companies are overpaid.  If you are like a Steve Jobs who is CEO and inventor, then you are worth every dime, because he was developing the product that was making the money.  But for the caretaker of the throne type CEO's that make $25 million then complain that they can't pay workers more than $10 an hour because profits will go down, I think they are full of crap.    That is for all industries, not just auto.

Completely agree. Well stated, sir. 

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^^^^^ +1 as I totally agree with you SMK about Sergio being way over paid. Most really are. They could grow companies so much more if they kept their pay reasonable and actually shared the profit with the employees who would most likely work harder if they know they get a portion of the profit from the company performing well.

While I completely agree, we don't know that they aren't getting a form of "profit sharing" for the very good few years they've had. 

 

Like Walmart. All people see is X dollars/hr. but they never hear about the quarterly bonuses for having a good store with high scores in sales, customer appreciation, shrinkage, etc, etc. . That's for all employees, not just management. The store I worked at was typically between $200-600 and then there were quarters w/o a bonus and then quarters w/ ~$900 bonus. 

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^^^^^ +1 as I totally agree with you SMK about Sergio being way over paid. Most really are. They could grow companies so much more if they kept their pay reasonable and actually shared the profit with the employees who would most likely work harder if they know they get a portion of the profit from the company performing well.

While I completely agree, we don't know that they aren't getting a form of "profit sharing" for the very good few years they've had. 

 

Like Walmart. All people see is X dollars/hr. but they never hear about the quarterly bonuses for having a good store with high scores in sales, customer appreciation, shrinkage, etc, etc. . That's for all employees, not just management. The store I worked at was typically between $200-600 and then there were quarters w/o a bonus and then quarters w/ ~$900 bonus. 

 

Very True, I just wish more companies would have transparency and show these benefits as it does help recruit better quality employees.

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