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    LA Auto Show: 2016 Honda HR-V


    • Honda 'Finally' Details the HR-V For North America


    Next up in the subcompact crossover fest at the LA Auto Show is the 2016 Honda HR-V. Now we've seen different variations of this new model since it was introduced in Japan last year. Now we get the specs for the North American version.

    While the HR-V is based on the new Fit, the styling is heavily influenced by the larger CR-V with similar front ends and roof shape. But the HR-V has its own unique design touches such as the rear door handles integrated in the rear pillar. The HR-V has an overall length for the new model is 169.1 inches, about 10 inches shorter than the CR-V. But on wheelbases, the two models are very close. The HR-V rides on a 102.8-inch wheelbase, just 0.3 inches shorter than the CR-V's wheelbase.

    Inside, the HR-V features a airy cockpit with loads of standard features such as Hill Start Assist and a multi-angle rearview camera. The Fit's Magic Seat storage system which allows the rear seat to be configured in five different ways helps the HR-V's storage which is a maximum of 58.8 cubic feet.

    Honda says the 2016 HR-V will be heading to dealers early next year.

    Source: Honda

    Press Release is on Page 2


    All-new 2016 Honda HR-V Crossover Makes North American Debut at 2014 Los Angeles Auto Show

    • 2016 Honda HR-V crossover – arriving early next year – delivers dynamic styling, incredibly spacious and versatile cabin and fun, fuel-efficient performance

    Nov 19, 2014 - LOS ANGELES: The all-new 2016 Honda HR-V crossover, unveiled today at the 2014 Los Angeles International Auto Show, blends the styling of a coupe, the toughness, space and utility of a SUV and the quality of a Honda in one sporty, personal and versatile multi-dimensional vehicle. The well-equipped HR-V, launching at Honda dealerships nationwide early next year, will enter the fast-growing entry crossover market with dynamic yet refined exterior styling, fun-to-drive performance, class-leading fuel economy ratings and unmatched interior spaciousness and cabin versatility.

    Utilizing a new global platform, the all-new Honda HR-V has one of the most spacious and versatile cabins in its class. Utilizing its unique platform design with a center-mounted fuel tank and reconfigurable second-row "Magic Seat," the completely new HR-V has voluminous interior space along with a flexible cabin featuring multiple seating/cargo modes. With 100.1 cu. ft. of passenger volume (LX) and 58.8 cu. ft. of cargo volume with the second row seats down, the HR-V has space to rival some competitors' mid-size SUV offerings.

    "The new HR-V crossover is a true segment-busting vehicle, unlike anything else on the market today," said Jeff Conrad, senior vice president American Honda Motor Co., Inc. and general manager of the Honda Division. "It's got all the essential elements of our Honda DNA, our packaging innovation, fuel-efficient powertrain technology, leading safety technology and, above all, Honda quality, to make this an incredibly compelling, sporty and value-packed new member of the Honda family."

    2016 HR-V Key Packaging Specifications Wheelbase, in. 102.8 Length, in. 169.1 Width, in. 69.8 Height, in. 63.2 Passenger volume, cu. ft. 100.1 (LX), 96.1 (EX, EX-L) Cargo volume, cu. ft. 24.3 rear seats up

    58.8 rear seats down Seating capacity 5

    The HR-V's dynamic appearance and sporty, solid stance is aided by its coupe-like cabin shape and bold and powerful face, complemented by distinctive side contours, including a sharply upswept character line, deeply sculpted lower body form and the strong horizontal taper of both the front and rear fascia. Concealed rear door handles further enhance its coupe-like appearance.

    The HR-V's sporty and sophisticated interior features an expansive, airy cockpit with an abundance of soft-touch materials and premium detailing punctuated by precise bezels, sophisticated stitch lines and upmarket brushed chrome and piano black highlights – all fitting its mission as a youthful yet refined personal crossover vehicle. The three-meter driver's instrument cluster features "floating" illumination rings and Honda's ECO Assist feature, wherein the speedometer illumination changes from white to green depending on the fuel efficiency of the driver's vehicle operation.

    Power comes from a highly refined and responsive 1.8-liter SOHC 16-valve 4-cylinder engine with i-VTEC valvetrain producing a peak 138 horsepower at 6,500 rpm and 127 lb.-ft. of torque at 4,300 rpm (both SAE net). The engine is mated to a sporty and fuel-efficient continuously variable transmission (CVT) with Honda "G-design" shift logic, or a slick-shifting 6-speed manual transmission (2WD models only). The HR-V is available in either two-wheel-drive or all-wheel-drive drivetrain configurations. All-wheel-drive models feature Honda's Real Time AWD with Intelligent Control System for outstanding all-weather traction and control. Driving efficiency, handling performance and cabin quietness are further aided by an aerodynamic shape and a lightweight yet rigid body structure with significant noise-insulating materials and design features.

    In keeping with Honda's commitment to safety, the HR-V is expected to deliver top-in-class collision safety performance and incorporates Honda's next-generation Advanced Compatibility Engineering™ (ACE™) front body structure, designed to more efficiently absorb and disperse the energy from a frontal collision. Standard safety and driver-assistive features include four-channel anti-lock brakes (ABS) with Brake Assist and Hill Start Assist; Vehicle Stability Assist™ (VSA®) with Traction Control; an Expanded View Driver's Mirror; a Multi-Angle Rearview Camera; dual-stage, multiple-threshold front airbags, driver and front passenger SmartVent™ side airbags and side-curtain airbags for all outboard seating positions; and Tire Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS). The HR-V is anticipated to earn top collision safety ratings from the NHTSA (5-Star Overall Vehicle Score) and IIHS (Top Safety Pick).

    Standard equipment on all HR-V models, available in LX, EX and EX-L trims, include power windows, power mirrors and power door and tailgate locks, electronic parking brake, rearview camera, aluminum-alloy wheels, tilt and telescoping steering wheel with audio and cruise controls, Bluetooth® HandsFreeLink® phone interface and Pandora radio. Higher trim models can be equipped with premium features including Honda's 7-inch touchscreen Display Audio telematics interface, Honda LaneWatch™, Smart Entry/Push-Button Start, paddle shifters, SiriusXM® radio, HD Radio™ and Honda Digital Traffic, heated front seats, a power sunroof, embedded navigation and leather trim.

    The 2016 Honda HR-V is covered by a comprehensive 3-year/36,000 mile new vehicle limited warranty and a 5-year/60,000 mile powertrain limited warranty. Additional benefits of ownership include Honda Roadside Assistance, which provides free 24-hour roadside assistance during the 3-year/36,000-mile new vehicle limited warranty term. The HR-V will be manufactured alongside the Fit at Honda's newest North American auto plant, in Celaya, Mexico.

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    WOW, could you make this any more forgettable!  I just do not get Honda's lack of design language or at least building something that will stick in a persons mind. Yet I am sure the ultra conservative people will love it.

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    Honda will sell the bejezus out of these, but some of those sales will come at the expense of CR-V sales and possibly Fit sales. I'm sure Honda has accounted for that though. 

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    I actually like this, and that Magic Seat thingamabob is pretty smart.  I just wish it weren't gutless, at least on paper.  I wonder what a drag race would reveal between this, the Trax, 500X, and CX-3.

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    Don't forget the Renegade! It probably has the most powerful available engine in the lot with the 2.4 being available under the hood. 

     

    Do you guys think the Subaru CrossTrek should be considered in this class as well?  

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    I guess it's on the verge of it.  Before I bought my current car, I drove a Crosstrek, and I found it to ride too hard, plus I felt like the manual trans needed another gear, it felt like it was wound too tight to me.

     

    You can get the 2.4L Tigershark in the 500X, IIRC.

    Edited by ocnblu
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    I guess it's on the verge of it.  Before I bought my current car, I drove a Crosstrek, and I found it to ride too hard, plus I felt like the manual trans needed another gear, it felt like it was wound too tight to me.

     

    You can get the 2.4L Tigershark in the 500X, IIRC.

     

    Yeah but this will be the rare case where the Fiat is actually the heavier car.

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    I feel like this had promise... But I was hoping for more power than 138 naturally aspirated horses. Perhaps foolish on my part, but if you combine that with the CVT and AWD, it's going to be quite sluggish. I'll be surprised, otherwise. Also, how long until people start complaining about the touch-sensitive climate controls? It hasn't worked for Ford or Cadillac, I doubt Honda could have really made it usable. 

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    depends on how they tune the CVT and AWD. Hondas are FWD until they detect slip in the rear wheels (and then sometimes they still stay FWD), so it's not like it has to run the AWD system 99% of the time. Encore and the Trax have 138hp also, around town it feels quite zippy because the 1st and 2nd gear are really short, if Honda tunes the CVT the same way, it'll do okay.  The only time I ever wish for more is highway ramp acceleration when already going a decent speed.   The Encore runs in 50/50 AWD at take-off then switches to FWD after it decides everything is safe. 

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      Horsepower @ RPM: 383 @ 5,600
      Torque @ RPM: 403 @ 3,600
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 13/18/15
      Curb Weight: 6,000 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Aichi, Japn
      Base Price: $88,880
      As Tested Price: $96,905 (Includes $940.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      Mark Levinson Audio System - $2,150.00
      Dual-Screen DVD Rear-Seat Entertainment System - $2,005.00
      Luxury Package - $1,190.00
      Heads-Up Display - $900.00
      Cargo Mat, Net, Wheel Locks, & Key Glove - $250.00
      All-Weather Floor Mats - $165.00
      Heated Black Shimamoku Steering Wheel - $150.00
      Wireless Charger - $75.00
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