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    New York Auto Show: 2017 Fiat 124 Spider Elaborazione Abarth


    • Mouthful of a name, but it is the spiciest 124 Spider


    When Fiat announced the Abarth 124 Spider earlier this month at Geneva, we found ourselves wondering if and when it would be here. Today we have the answer to both of those questions. Meet the 2017 Fiat 124 Spider Elaborazione Abarth.

     

    Yes, we know the name is a bit of mouthful. But a lot of the European-market Abarth Spider carries over to the U.S. It starts with the looks. The 124 Spider Elaborazione Abarth features a more aggressive front end, matte black hood, and 17-inch wheels finished in grey. The interior features red stitching, aluminum pedals, and optional Recaro seats.

     

    Power comes from a turbocharged 1.4L four-cylinder producing 160 horsepower and 184 pound-feet of torque. No, that isn't a misprint. Somehow, the Spider lost 10 horsepower during the Atlantic crossing. At least the choice of either a six-speed manual or automatic remains. Other important bits of the 124 Spider Elaborazione Abarth include Bilstein front and rear mono-tube shocks, limited slip differential, and an optional Brembo brake package.

     

    Fiat hasn't revealed when the 124 Spider Elaborazione Abarth will arrive at dealers. We suspect it will be sometime after the 124 Spider goes on sale this summer.

     

    Source: Fiat

     

    Press Release is on Page 2


     

    2017 Fiat 124 Spider Elaborazione Abarth Offers Sportier, More Responsive Driving Experience for Performance Enthusiasts

    • 2017 Fiat 124 Spider Elaborazione Abarth features sport suspension, mechanical limited slip differential, Sport Mode selector and sport-tuned, chrome quad-tip exhaust
    • Available Brembo braking system and Recaro seats for added sportiness
    • Powered by turbocharged MultiAir 1.4-liter engine for 160 horsepower and 184 lb.-ft. of torque, available with manual transmission or automatic transmission with paddle shifters
    • Aggressive appearance with unique front and rear fascia, 17-inch Gun Metal aluminum wheels, Gun Metal exterior accents and available hand-painted hood stripe, offering a one-of-a-kind appearance
    • 2017 Fiat 124 Spider delivers best-in-class horsepower and torque
    • Fiat 124 Spider models will be available in studios beginning this summer


    March 22, 2016 , Auburn Hills, Mich. - Since the introduction of the Fiat 500 Abarth at the 2011 Los Angeles Auto Show, the DNA of Abarth has connected with driving enthusiasts in search of a sharp, wicked, fun-to-drive machine. Continuing the legacy of Karl Abarth’s performance-inspired vehicles known for their rich racing heritage, the 2017 Fiat 124 Elaborazione Abarth will debut at this year’s New York International Auto Show.

     


    The Fiat 124 Elaborazione Abarth is the heir of the roadster that drove Fiat to its first European Rally Championship win in the 1970s. Applying the Abarth formula, the new 124 Spider is designed and built for thrills and performance. Key Abarth features include rear-wheel drive, a sophisticated suspension and a four-cylinder turbocharged MultiAir 1.4 Turbo engine with best-in-class 160 horsepower that is available with a six-speed manual or six-speed automatic gearbox with paddle shift.

     

    The 2017 Fiat 124 Spider Elaborazione Abarth is the latest addition to the Fiat 124 Spider lineup, offering added performance features for a sportier, more spirited driving experience. While all Fiat 124 Spider models deliver responsive handling and excellent power-to-weight ratio in a robust rear-wheel-drive package, the Elaborazione Abarth model builds on the Spider’s engaging driving dynamics to offer even more fun for performance enthusiasts.

     

    “Our new Fiat 124 Spider is an iconic roadster that combines classic Italian styling with modern performance and technology,” said Olivier Francois, Head of FIAT Brand, FCA – Global. “The addition of our new 2017 Fiat 124 Spider Elaborazione Abarth further enhances the driving experience and offers yet another head-turning, fun-to-drive vehicle to our customers.”

     

    Performance characteristics
    The 2017 Fiat 124 Spider Elaborazione Abarth features the proven turbocharged 1.4-liter MultiAir four-cylinder engine, delivering 160 horsepower and 184 lb.-ft. of torque and is paired with either a six-speed manual transmission or a six-speed automatic transmission with paddle shifters. The Elaborazione Abarth-exclusive Sport Mode changes the calibrations of the engine, automatic transmission, electric power steering and dynamic stability control system to ensure a sporty, responsive and performance-oriented driving experience.

     

    A mechanical limited slip differential, featuring a low torque bias ratio, provides improved traction and handling, as well as improved launch performance and power delivery during cornering. The Elaborazione Abarth’s unique sport suspension includes mono-tube Bilstein front and rear shock absorbers for increased traction and more precise handling. The available Brembo braking system with 17-inch alloy wheels offers monoblock aluminum calipers with four pistons, allowing for improved braking.

     

    Aggressive appearance
    With a streamlined silhouette and a stretched bonnet, the Fiat 124 Spider Elaborazione Abarth has an aggressive appearance, with unique front and rear fascia, black side sills, 17-inch Gun Metal aluminum wheels and a sport-tuned, chrome quad-tip exhaust with a unique exhaust sound. The Gun Metal header, mirror cover and roll bar complement five available paint colors: Bianco Gelato (White Clear Coat), Rosso Passione (Red Clear Coat), Nero Cinema (Jet Black Metallic), Grigio Argento (Gray Metallic) and tri-coat Bianco Perla (Crystal White Pearl).

     

    The interior design reflects the performance-oriented details for which cars sporting the Scorpion badge are famous. There is Rosso (red) stitching throughout, including on the leather-wrapped steering wheel, wrapped instrument cluster hood, lower instrument panel and parking brake. A matte black instrument panel bezel, unique instrument cluster, aluminum-accented sport pedals and unique gear shift knob help to differentiate the Elaborazione Abarth model. Unique Nero (black) leather/microfiber seats are standard, while leather seats in Nero (black) or Nero/Rosso (black/red) are available. For true performance enthusiasts, leather and Alcantara Recaro seats are also available in Nero (black).

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    User Feedback


    Does anyone here see a resemblance to the Dart?

     

    I mean you could fit a crosshair grille...

     

    Yes you could and I see the visual clues that would give you that vibe, but do you really want to wish such an unreliable name plate product onto the Dart? Just saying, I know peeps will point out this is a mazda but still the linger of terrible products for ever built and left to rust in America before their first exit still stinks strongly in the mind!

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