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    William Maley

    Aston Martin Aims For A Electric Version of the Rapide

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      Aston's CEO Reveals An Electrifying Plan for the Rapide

    Aston Martin is readying their own electric vehicle. Speaking with Automotive News at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, Aston CEO Andy Palmer revealed that the British sports car maker will be launching an all-electric version of its four-door Rapide in the next two years.

     

    The emphasis on electric cars for Aston Martin is being driven by two key factors; emissions and competition from the Tesla Model S.

     

    “If you want to keep making V-12 engines, then you’ve got to do something at the opposite end of the spectrum,” said Palmer.

     

    This is important in markets in China where emission standards are becoming stricter for V8 and V12 engines.

     

    Also, Aston Martin is going on the offensive. Palmer points to the Tesla Model S and says there is an opportunity for a sexy and powerful electric car to sit above the P90 D, Tesla's most powerful model.

     

    “What Tesla clearly shows you is we haven’t hit the ceiling in terms of price. But I think it’s hard, though not impossible, for them as a relatively new brand to keep pushing up and to go into that super premier area,” said Palmer.

     

    Palmer did give some details of what he hopes for the electric Rapide: 800 horsepower, all-wheel drive, a range of 200 Miles, and a pricetag around $200,000 to $250,000.

     

    Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required)

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    Very Cool, So happy to see this auto and that Tesla is finally getting some competition.

     

    I wonder when GM would consider either a Corvette EV or allow Cadillac to offer a new XLR EV that would deliver this kind of performance.

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