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    William Maley

    As the Diesel Emits: Audi's r&d Boss Steps Down, Current CEO Cleared In Emission Investigation

      Audi's CEO found to not have any knowledge of the software cheat, while the r&d boss says good-bye.

    It has been a mixed few days at Audi. Last Friday, sources told Reuters that no evidence was found that Audi CEO Rupert Stadler knew about the illegal cheating software. Stadler was questioned earlier in the week by U.S. law firm Jones Day - the group brought in by Volkswagen to conduct an internal investigation. Stadler's questioning came around the same time as media reports saying that Audi was more entangled in the diesel emission scandal than previously thought.

    "Nothing burdensome against Stadler was found," said a source.

    Then on Monday, Audi's r&d head Stefan Knirsch stepped down from his post and left the company. As we reported last week , Knirsch reportedly knew about the illegal software and lied about under oath during an internal investigation. At the time, Knirsch was going to be suspended. In a statement, Audi said Knirsch would be leaving immediately. The company did not say the reason for his departure or who would take his place.

    Source: Reuters, 2

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