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  1. We're coming up on three years since the Volkswagen diesel scandal came to light. It caused the German automaker to spiral downward with various fines, lawsuits, people either stepping down or being arrested, and sales tanking. By now, you would think that the pain is done and over. But you would be wrong. Reuters reports today that prosecutors in Germany have fined Volkswagen a billion euros ($1.18 billion) over diesel emission cheating. In a statement, Volkswagen will accept the fine, therefore admitting responsibility for the cheating. "Following thorough examination, Volkswagen A
  2. We're coming up on three years since the Volkswagen diesel scandal came to light. It caused the German automaker to spiral downward with various fines, lawsuits, people either stepping down or being arrested, and sales tanking. By now, you would think that the pain is done and over. But you would be wrong. Reuters reports today that prosecutors in Germany have fined Volkswagen a billion euros ($1.18 billion) over diesel emission cheating. In a statement, Volkswagen will accept the fine, therefore admitting responsibility for the cheating. "Following thorough examination, Volkswagen A
  3. Another day, another raid by German prosecutors into Volkswagen's diesel emission scandal. Yesterday, 160 investigators conducted searches in about 10 premises in Bavaria and Baden-Wuerttemberg owned by Porsche. Prosecutors said in a statement to Reuters the raids are part of an investigation into Porsche employees on charges of fraud and fraudulent advertising tied to the cheating software used on diesel engines. “The three suspects include a member of the management board and a member of Porsche AG’s higher management. The third suspect is no longer employed at Porsche AG,” said prosecu
  4. Another day, another raid by German prosecutors into Volkswagen's diesel emission scandal. Yesterday, 160 investigators conducted searches in about 10 premises in Bavaria and Baden-Wuerttemberg owned by Porsche. Prosecutors said in a statement to Reuters the raids are part of an investigation into Porsche employees on charges of fraud and fraudulent advertising tied to the cheating software used on diesel engines. “The three suspects include a member of the management board and a member of Porsche AG’s higher management. The third suspect is no longer employed at Porsche AG,” said prosecu
  5. As if the Volkswagen Group needed more headaches, a new report says there's a bit of infighting between Audi and Porsche. German tabloid Bild reports that Porsche is seeking 200 million Euros (about $234 million) from Audi to cover costs from the diesel emission scandal. Reportedly, Porsche management delivered this claim in a letter to their counterparts at Audi. Bild doesn't mention any source, so take this report with a fair amount of salt. When reached for comment by Reuters, a Porsche spokesman said internal issues were not open for public discussion. An Audi spokesperson declin
  6. As if the Volkswagen Group needed more headaches, a new report says there's a bit of infighting between Audi and Porsche. German tabloid Bild reports that Porsche is seeking 200 million Euros (about $234 million) from Audi to cover costs from the diesel emission scandal. Reportedly, Porsche management delivered this claim in a letter to their counterparts at Audi. Bild doesn't mention any source, so take this report with a fair amount of salt. When reached for comment by Reuters, a Porsche spokesman said internal issues were not open for public discussion. An Audi spokesperson declin
  7. One question that we have found ourselves wondering is who blew the whistle on the software cheat Volkswagen was using on their TDI models. A new book says it was someone at Volkswagen of America. Automotive News got their hands on Faster, Higher, Farther: The Volkswagen Scandal by New York Times reporter Jack Ewing. In the book, Ewing reveals that the head of VW’s Engineering and Environmental Office in the U.S., Stuart Johnson revealed the existence of the cheat to federal authorities. Johnson was the primary contact for the various regulation agencies in the U.S. and would be one of th
  8. One question that we have found ourselves wondering is who blew the whistle on the software cheat Volkswagen was using on their TDI models. A new book says it was someone at Volkswagen of America. Automotive News got their hands on Faster, Higher, Farther: The Volkswagen Scandal by New York Times reporter Jack Ewing. In the book, Ewing reveals that the head of VW’s Engineering and Environmental Office in the U.S., Stuart Johnson revealed the existence of the cheat to federal authorities. Johnson was the primary contact for the various regulation agencies in the U.S. and would be one of th
  9. Today at U.S. District Court in Detroit, Volkswagen pleaded guilty on three felony charges relating to the diesel emission scandal as part of a plea agreement. The three felonies are conspiracy, obstruction of justice, and introducing imported merchandise into the United States by means of false statements. "Your honor, VW AG is pleading guilty to all three counts because it is guilty on all three counts," said Volkswagen general counsel Manfred Doess at the hearing. As part of the plea deal, Volkswagen will pay $4.3 billion in penalties and have an independent monitor to oversee U.S
  10. Today at U.S. District Court in Detroit, Volkswagen pleaded guilty on three felony charges relating to the diesel emission scandal as part of a plea agreement. The three felonies are conspiracy, obstruction of justice, and introducing imported merchandise into the United States by means of false statements. "Your honor, VW AG is pleading guilty to all three counts because it is guilty on all three counts," said Volkswagen general counsel Manfred Doess at the hearing. As part of the plea deal, Volkswagen will pay $4.3 billion in penalties and have an independent monitor to oversee U.S
  11. Ever since Martin Winterkorn resigned from his post as Volkswagen Group CEO due to diesel emission scandal sixteen months ago, he has been out of the spotlight. However, Winterkorn made his first public appearance today at a parliamentary committee in Berlin investigating the emission irregularities of automobiles. At the hearing, Winterkorn maintained his innocence, saying he had no part in the cheating, nor knew anything about it. “It’s incomprehensible why I wasn’t informed early and clearly. I would have prevented any type of deception or misleading of authorities,” said Winterkorn.
  12. Ever since Martin Winterkorn resigned from his post as Volkswagen Group CEO due to diesel emission scandal sixteen months ago, he has been out of the spotlight. However, Winterkorn made his first public appearance today at a parliamentary committee in Berlin investigating the emission irregularities of automobiles. At the hearing, Winterkorn maintained his innocence, saying he had no part in the cheating, nor knew anything about it. “It’s incomprehensible why I wasn’t informed early and clearly. I would have prevented any type of deception or misleading of authorities,” said Winterkorn.
  13. American criminal lawyers are in demand at Volkswagen. Bloomberg has learned from sources that various executives at the company are hiring lawyers as the Department of Justice begins sending out officials to Germany for meetings to gather evidence for possible criminal charges. Volkswagen has already agreed to a $16 billion settlement over the diesel emission scandal. But the Department of Justice is continuing their investigation into whether various Volkswagen executives knew about the cheating software installed on over 10 million diesel vehicles around the world. As we reported back
  14. American criminal lawyers are in demand at Volkswagen. Bloomberg has learned from sources that various executives at the company are hiring lawyers as the Department of Justice begins sending out officials to Germany for meetings to gather evidence for possible criminal charges. Volkswagen has already agreed to a $16 billion settlement over the diesel emission scandal. But the Department of Justice is continuing their investigation into whether various Volkswagen executives knew about the cheating software installed on over 10 million diesel vehicles around the world. As we reported back
  15. The first person has been charged in the U.S.' Volkswagen diesel emission probe. Today at the U.S. Federal Court in Detroit, James Robert Liang, leader of diesel competence for Volkswagen from 2008 until June of this year entered a plea of guilty to conspiracy to defraud the U.S. government, commit wire fraud, and violate the Clean Air Act. According to grand jury indictment filed back in June and unsealed today, “Liang and his co-conspirators, including current and former employees, and others, agreed to defraud the U.S. and VW customers, and violate the Clean Air Act, by misleading th
  16. You're a Volkswagen 2.0L TDI owner who decided to take the buy-back offer. You have a sizeable check in your pocket and decide to go looking for a new car. The folks at Hyundai and Volvo are hoping you buy one of their vehicles and are offering special deals to try and rope you in. CarsDirect has learned about the offers the two automakers are putting forward to former Volkswagen owners. Hyundai's offer is the Hyundai Circle V-Plan - think Ford's X plan pricing for friends and family. This plan takes 3 percent off the MSRP, plus $1,250 V-Plan cash and current incentives. You'll need to br
  17. You're a Volkswagen 2.0L TDI owner who decided to take the buy-back offer. You have a sizeable check in your pocket and decide to go looking for a new car. The folks at Hyundai and Volvo are hoping you buy one of their vehicles and are offering special deals to try and rope you in. CarsDirect has learned about the offers the two automakers are putting forward to former Volkswagen owners. Hyundai's offer is the Hyundai Circle V-Plan - think Ford's X plan pricing for friends and family. This plan takes 3 percent off the MSRP, plus $1,250 V-Plan cash and current incentives. You'll need to br
  18. Volkswagen can take a sigh of relief as it appears the current CEO, Matthias Müller, didn't have any prior knowledge of the diesel emission cheating. German newspaper Bild am Sonntag (via Reuters) got their hands on a report done by Jones Day which said Müller didn't find out the scandal till the EPA made the announcement - September 18, 2015 if you're wondering. Only a week later, Müller would be named CEO of Volkswagen. Still, Müller's track record on dealing with the diesel emission mess is spotty. He has said the scandal was just a 'technical problem' and a misunderstanding about U.S
  19. Volkswagen can take a sigh of relief as it appears the current CEO, Matthias Müller, didn't have any prior knowledge of the diesel emission cheating. German newspaper Bild am Sonntag (via Reuters) got their hands on a report done by Jones Day which said Müller didn't find out the scandal till the EPA made the announcement - September 18, 2015 if you're wondering. Only a week later, Müller would be named CEO of Volkswagen. Still, Müller's track record on dealing with the diesel emission mess is spotty. He has said the scandal was just a 'technical problem' and a misunderstanding about U.S
  20. After ten months when news came to light that Volkswagen used illegal software to cheat emission tests in the U.S. the German automaker has agreed to a $14.7 billion settlement. This morning, the U.S. Justice Department filed details of the settlement in U.S. District Court in San Fransisco. As part of the settlement, Volkswagen will offer owners of affected models the choice of either having their vehicle bought back or repaired if and when a repair is approved by the EPA and CARB. If you decide to have your vehicle bought back by Volkswagen, will be determined based on
  21. It has been a mixed few days at Audi. Last Friday, sources told Reuters that no evidence was found that Audi CEO Rupert Stadler knew about the illegal cheating software. Stadler was questioned earlier in the week by U.S. law firm Jones Day - the group brought in by Volkswagen to conduct an internal investigation. Stadler's questioning came around the same time as media reports saying that Audi was more entangled in the diesel emission scandal than previously thought. "Nothing burdensome against Stadler was found," said a source. Then on Monday, Audi's r&d head Stefan Knirsch step
  22. It has been a mixed few days at Audi. Last Friday, sources told Reuters that no evidence was found that Audi CEO Rupert Stadler knew about the illegal cheating software. Stadler was questioned earlier in the week by U.S. law firm Jones Day - the group brought in by Volkswagen to conduct an internal investigation. Stadler's questioning came around the same time as media reports saying that Audi was more entangled in the diesel emission scandal than previously thought. "Nothing burdensome against Stadler was found," said a source. Then on Monday, Audi's r&d head Stefan Knirsch step
  23. In the neverending saga that is the Volkswagen diesel emission scandal, Audi's head of R&D will be suspended this week due to knowing about the cheat used in the 3.0L TDI V6. German newspaper Bild am Sonntag (via Reuters) learned from sources that Stefan Knirsch knew about the software and lied under oath about it during an internal investigation. Bild says Knirsch has been asked to clear his desk. Not surprisingly, Volkswagen, Audi and Audi's works council declined to comment. Source: Bild am Sonntag via Reuters View full article
  24. In the neverending saga that is the Volkswagen diesel emission scandal, Audi's head of R&D will be suspended this week due to knowing about the cheat used in the 3.0L TDI V6. German newspaper Bild am Sonntag (via Reuters) learned from sources that Stefan Knirsch knew about the software and lied under oath about it during an internal investigation. Bild says Knirsch has been asked to clear his desk. Not surprisingly, Volkswagen, Audi and Audi's works council declined to comment. Source: Bild am Sonntag via Reuters
  25. The first person has been charged in the U.S.' Volkswagen diesel emission probe. Today at the U.S. Federal Court in Detroit, James Robert Liang, leader of diesel competence for Volkswagen from 2008 until June of this year entered a plea of guilty to conspiracy to defraud the U.S. government, commit wire fraud, and violate the Clean Air Act. According to grand jury indictment filed back in June and unsealed today, “Liang and his co-conspirators, including current and former employees, and others, agreed to defraud the U.S. and VW customers, and violate the Clean Air Act, by misleading th

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