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    It's Official! Fiat Chrysler Automobiles and Google Announce A Partnership


    • FCA and Google Confirm Self-Driving Partnership


    Over the weekend, we reported that Fiat Chrysler Automobiles and Alphabet Inc. - Google's parent company - were in talks about a technology partnership to use Google's self-driving tech in a vehicle, the new Chrysler Pacifica. Yesterday, the companies made it official.

     

    This is the first time that Google has partnered directly with an automaker to integrate their autonomous tech into a vehicle.

     

    The deal will see FCA build 100 specially prepared Pacifica Plug-In Hybrid vans that will be sent over to Google where they'll get to have autonomous hardware and software fitted. Both companies will share a facility near FCA's headquarters in Auburn Hills, MI.

     

    This group of vans will be used for testing purposes and double Google's test fleet from 100 to 200 vehicles. Now the deal is non-exclusive to both parties. It is also unknown if this deal is a one-off or could lead to something more.

     

    “The opportunity to work closely with FCA engineers will accelerate our efforts to develop a fully self-driving car that will make our roads safer and bring everyday destinations within reach for those who cannot drive,” said John Krafcik, Chief Executive Officer, Google Self-Driving Car Project.

     

    Source: Fiat Chrysler Automobiles, Google

     

    Press Release is on Page 2


     

    Google Self-Driving Car Project and FCA Announce First-of-its-kind Collaboration

    • Google expands self-driving test program with the all-new 2017 Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid minivan
    • FCA engineers to work alongside Google engineers to integrate self-driving technology into vehicle
    • Self-driving cars have the potential to make our roads safer and make transportation more accessible for millions of people


    May 3, 2016 , Auburn Hills, Mich. - The Google Self-Driving Car Project and FCA announced today, in a first-of-its-kind collaboration, that they will integrate Google’s self-driving technology into all-new 2017 Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid minivans to expand Google’s existing self-driving test program. This marks the first time that Google has worked directly with an automaker to integrate its self-driving system, including its sensors and software, into a passenger vehicle.

     


    The Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid minivans will be used later this year for Google’s self-driving testing, more than doubling Google’s current fleet of self-driving test vehicles. Engineering responsibilities will be shared based on each company’s respective expertise. FCA will initially design and engineer around 100 vehicles uniquely built for Google’s self-driving technology. Google will integrate the suite of sensors and computers that the vehicles will rely on to navigate roads autonomously.

     

    Both companies will co-locate part of their engineering teams at a facility in southeastern Michigan to accelerate the design, testing and manufacturing of the self-driving Chrysler Pacifica.

     

    “FCA has a nimble and experienced engineering team and the Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid minivan is well-suited for Google’s self-driving technology,” said John Krafcik, Chief Executive Officer, Google Self-Driving Car Project. “The opportunity to work closely with FCA engineers will accelerate our efforts to develop a fully self-driving car that will make our roads safer and bring everyday destinations within reach for those who cannot drive.”

     

    Self-driving cars have the potential to prevent some of the 33,000 deaths that occur each year on U.S. roads, 94 percent of which are caused by human error. This collaboration will help FCA and Google better understand what it will take to bring self-driving cars into the world.

     

    “Working with Google provides an opportunity for FCA to partner with one of the world’s leading technology companies to accelerate the pace of innovation in the automotive industry,” said Sergio Marchionne, Chief Executive Officer, FCA. “The experience both companies gain will be fundamental to delivering automotive technology solutions that ultimately have far-reaching consumer benefits.”

     

    Google’s self-driving cars are currently being tested in four U.S. cities. The self-driving Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid minivans will be tested by Google’s self-driving car team on its private test track in California prior to operating on public roads.

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    That sucks.. I like Google too. lol

     

    I guess the newest FCA products will at least get modern user interfaces with their decade old cars.  :smilewide:

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    If they could come up with a fully autonomous Pacifica that would be pretty sweet.  You could set the computer to your destination and lay down in back and sleep overnight and arrive at your destination.  That is better than first class airline travel with those bed/chair things.

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